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2018-2019 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook
Saybrook University
   
 
  Apr 11, 2021
 
2018-2019 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook 
    
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2018-2019 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook [Archived Catalog]

Course Descriptions


Courses are identified and organized by degree program. Listed below are those courses that may be offered through the Department of Humanistic & Clinical Psychology for the Psychology degree program as well as the Human Science degree program for the 2015-2016 academic school year. CampusVue will list courses open for enrollment each semester, by Section if applicable.

Courses are identified and organized by degree programs: Clinical Psychology, PhD. Courses listed are offered as online cohort (CO), residential (R), or individually-mentored online (IO). Not all courses are offered every semester. See Program Descriptions and Requirements section of the College of Social Sciences section of this catalog and the Saybrook University website for updates and/or changes to courses.

 

Consciousness, Spirituality, and Integrative Health

  
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    CSIH 3150 - Neuropsychology of Dreams and Dreaming


    Welcome to one of the most fascinating areas of investigation in consciousness studies; few if any other areas bring together in one place as many aspects of neuropsychology. In this course students will learn more than brain physiology and theories of how brain function is connected to nighttime dreaming; they will also obtain a bird’s eye view of the mind and the brain working together, as beautifully exemplified in the exquisitely complex yet simple action of the sleeping brain. This course focuses on the neuropsychological aspects of dreaming. In doing so, it explores differences between activity in the waking and sleeping brain, examines the major views on how dreams are generated in the sleeping brain, and opens for discussion the implications of this knowledge for a richer understanding of the nature of waking and dreaming consciousness. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 3160 - Personal Mythology and Dreamwork


    In this course, students will learn what is meant by the term “personal mythology.” They will be introduced to the idea that every person develops a particular personal mythology that guides and influences his or her perceptions, thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. They will be introduced to the primary factors that seem to be responsible for the development of particular personal mythologies (e.g., a person’s genetic inheritance, family of origin, kinship group, and social milieu). The course can be taken with an experiential emphasis, an academic emphasis, or a mixture of these. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 3165 - Understanding and Appreciating Dreams


    This course offers valuable tools for individuals and groups. Engaging in dreamwork can offer personal insight and spiritual growth. The “grassroots dream movement” has initiated non- clinical uses of dream reports for purposes of creative expression, spiritual development, and group exploration. This course covers the use of recalled dreams in both clinical and non-clinical settings. It spans a variety of ideological perspectives, emphasizing those that can be quickly learned and adroitly applied with minimal risk and maximum benefit to the dreamer. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 3200 - Seminar in Consciousness, Spirituality, and Integrative Health


    This course provides an introduction to the primary themes in consciousness, spirituality, and integrative health. Students will be introduced to foundational definitions, concepts, and theories. This course will also serve to orient students to the Consciousness, Spirituality, and Integrative Health Specialization, including curriculum paths, vocational possibilities, and relevant professional organizations and conferences. It is recommended that students in the Consciousness, Spirituality, and Integrative Health Specialization begin with this course. It provides foundational knowledge that will be built upon in future coursework. Additionally, this course introduces various career paths in order to help students identify, at the outset, the courses that will be most relevant to meeting their future vocational aspirations. Students will also become familiar with various resources that will be useful in their future coursework. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 3205 - Spiritual Direction


    This course provides a professional, academic, and personal introduction to spiritual direction (often called spiritual guidance) as a profession and as a support to other professions. The primary goal of this course is to explore the role of spiritual direction within and outside spiritual traditions. Students will be introduced to foundational definitions, concepts, dynamics, and processes in this developing field. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 3210 - Stress Management Education


    “Stress management” appears to be a term that the general population as well as the scientific community has come to accept. A problem remains, however, in that the term is defined in a multitude of differing ways depending on the perspective of the presenter. Cultural, religious, spiritual, psychophysiological, and biological explanations all have valid views that focus on different aspects of stress. In addition to looking at these and many other aspects of stress management, this course also focuses on the teaching of stress management skills to those most in need of interventions for stress-related disorders. This course is intended to include interactive discussion and sharing via online discussion forums and to become a group project in the creation of stress management literature, video clips, brochures, and PowerPoint slides directed towards the teaching of stress management skills to various populations. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 3230 - Special Topics in Spiritual Direction


    This course explores topics related to spiritual direction (often called spiritual guidance) as a profession and as a support to other professions. The course is in a seminar format where, with instructor’s approval, each student selects the topic they wish to pursue and creates clear learning objectives. Appropriate topics include models of spiritual development, discernment processes, and case studies in spiritual direction. With ongoing feedback from the instructor and other students, each student then develops and presents to the class an annotated bibliography and a final paper on the topic chosen and guided by one is learning objectives. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 3235 - Essential Consulting Skills


    The Professional Consultant, especially one focused on health and stress management education, exercises a form of leadership without direct authority or control over an organization. Yet, consultants can play a critical role in mobilizing organizational resources, and inspiring a process of transformational change. Consultants may work in major university medical centers and hospital systems, corporate medical clinics and health systems, corporate wellness credits, health insurance organizations, and small community or privately based clinics and group practices. They can work with in small businesses, educational settings, or in almost any other setting in which stress and coping skills would benefit the client. Consultants work closely with other people who are responsible for the outcomes. Consulting can be part of any professional role such as that of a teacher, therapist, counselor, coach, or leader. A key skill is the ability to use influence and persuasion to help others get things done. This course will be a tour of the essential skills needed to function and thrive in the role of a consultant. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 3240 - Advanced Topics in CSIH Studies


    This course explores advanced topics related to studies in consciousness, spirituality and integrative health. The course is in a seminar format where, with instructor’s approval, each student selects the topic they wish to pursue and creates clear learning objectives. With ongoing feedback from the instructor and other students, each student then develops and presents to the class an annotated bibliography and a final paper on the topic chosen and guided by one’s learning objectives. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 4030 - Health Psychophysiology


    This course introduces scientific and experiential approaches to understanding the interaction of mind and body in health. The course surveys scientific principles of psychophysiology, introduces students to basic principles of psychophysiological measurement, and highlights research information relevant to mind/body (psychophysiological) healing, education, and wellness. The student learns to monitor physiological processes via simple biofeedback instrumentation, for clinical practice and research. The course offers an opportunity to explore mind-body relationships through an overview of theory, review of empirical findings, and experiential learning. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 4045 - The Buddhist Path of Healing


    This course focuses on the foundations of “healing” the mind-body split/unification from a Buddhist perspective. After introducing basic concepts of Buddhist health and healing, it goes on to examine this field’s important contributions to contemporary Western, integrative, and global health and wellness issues. Students are invited to involve themselves experientially in a variety of healing and meditation practices. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 4050 - Health Psychology: The Application of Psychological Concepts and Tools to Health


    The subject matter of health psychology as a discipline overlaps greatly with the fields of integrative health and mind-body medicine. In the broadest sense, health psychology is the organized and systematic effort to apply the knowledge and skills of the behavioral sciences to human health and illness. This course introduces health psychology as an application of psychological principles and skills to health care. It presents the framework, methodology, and applications of mainstream health psychology, and reviews common applications of health psychology, such as increasing patient compliance with well-lifestyle changes, and mind-body interventions to reduce irritable bowel or asthma symptoms. The course introduces basic skill sets in health psychology, such as brief dynamic psychotherapy, humanistic psychotherapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, health coaching, relaxation and meditation techniques, imagery therapy, biofeedback and applied psychophysiology, and hypnosis. Finally, it introduces divergent approaches to health psychology including optimal health and wellness programs, humanistic and existential psychology, energy psychology, and transpersonal/spiritual approaches. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 4070 - Ethics, Spirit, and Health Care


    This course provides an overview of the ethical principles and codes of conduct in psychology. It will focus on the guidelines for ethical practice that integrates the spiritual, physical, and psychological dimensions into one’s professional work with individuals and groups. This core ethics course will focus then on a breadth of ethical considerations and concerns pertinent to the evolving intersections of mind-body-spirit. An introduction to ethics and the Code of Conduct created by the American Psychological Association will be provided. Ethical issues involving spirituality, faith, and medicine will be explored with an emphasis on helping students consider ethical issues related to the specific focus of their professional and academic goals. In that context students will be encouraged to explore their own personal values, beliefs, and biases pertaining to moral and legal ethics in the field. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 4101 - Basic Training and Education in Applied Hypnosis


    This course provides students with a basic skill set to conduct simple hypnotic interventions, along with knowledge about hypnotic concepts and approaches, and a familiarity with research-based applications of hypnosis to common medical and behavioral disorders. This course provides students with an introductory level of understanding helpful for engaging in hypnosis-based clinical practice and hypnosis-oriented research in integrative health. This course will introduce simple trance induction protocols, trance deepening techniques, the use of post-hypnotic suggestion, and techniques to re-alert the subject and close the trance phase. In addition, the course will present an overview of current scientific approaches to explaining hypnotic phenomena, will introduce the measurement and significance of hypnotic susceptibility, and will discuss several of the widely used and effective approaches for utilizing hypnosis in psychotherapy and personal transformation. Students completing this basic training sequence will be equipped to begin the intermediate level training. The course is designed to follow the Standards of Training in Clinical Hypnosis as presented by D. Corydon Hammond and Gary R. Elkins (2005) for the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis-Education and Research Foundation. In this course, the student will complete 24 hours of basic didactic education qualifying toward eventual certification in clinical hypnosis by the American Society for Clinical Hypnosis. (Completion of the later intermediate-level training will provide an additional 20 hours of didactic education and an additional 6 hours of clinical consultation.) 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 4102 - Intermediate Training and Education in Hypnosis


    This course provides students with an advanced skill set to conduct advanced hypnotic interventions, along with additional knowledge about hypnotic concepts and approaches. In addition, the student develops a sophisticated ability to learn and assess new applications of hypnosis to common medical and behavioral disorders. This course provides students with an intermediate level of understanding helpful for engaging in hypnosis-based clinical practice and hypnosis-oriented research in integrative health. This course introduces more challenging trance induction protocols, trance deepening techniques, and uses of post-hypnotic suggestion. In addition, the student will learn specific approaches and techniques for a number of advanced application areas, including: 1) pain management, 2) treatment of anxiety disorders, 3) habit change protocols, 4) weight management, and 5) ego strengthening hypnotic interventions. In addition, the course reviews scientific approaches to investigating hypnotic phenomena, trains students to implement a widely accepted measure of hypnotic susceptibility, and engages the student in discussion of ethical and appropriate uses of hypnotic techniques. Students completing this intermediate training sequence will be equipped to utilize applied hypnosis skills in the course of any therapeutic process for which he or she is currently licensed. In this course, the student completes 20 hours of intermediate didactic education and 6 hours of additional clinical consultation qualifying toward eventual certification in clinical hypnosis by the American Society for Clinical Hypnosis. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 4103 - Advanced Hypnosis Practicum and Capstone Paper


    This course provides an immersion in advanced hypnotic technique and practice. Course readings and educational videos provide guidance and sample interventions utilizing hypnotic induction and therapeutic suggestion. The student engages in weekly hypnosis practice with volunteers and/or professional clients. The instructor(s) provide six videoconferences with discussion of strategies for hypnotic interventions for a variety of clinical and life problems, and supervision of the student’s practice. Students submit a video record of two hypnotic intervention sequences. Students complete a capstone essay, integrating their learning in the hypnosis course sequence, along with their learning in the advanced practicum course. Prerequisite(s): Open only to students pursuing the Clinical Hypnosis certificate; completion of CSIH 4101  and CSIH 4102 . 4 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 4105 - Basic Training and Education in General Biofeedback


    This course provides students with a basic skill set to conduct simple biofeedback interventions, along with knowledge about biofeedback concepts and approaches, and a familiarity with research-based applications of biofeedback to common medical and behavioral disorders. This course provides students with an introductory level of understanding helpful for engaging in biofeedback-based clinical practice and psychophysiological research in integrative health. This course introduces the most commonly used biofeedback instruments, the physiological systems they measure, and the applications of these biofeedback modalities to common medical and behavioral disorders. The Saybrook biofeedback training sequence covers the “Blueprint of Knowledge” adopted by the Biofeedback Certification Institute of America, to guide training of biofeedback professionals (BCIA, 2006). The basic course covers the following elements of the blueprint: Orientation to Biofeedback (4 hours), Stress Coping and Illness/Models for Biofeedback Practice (4 hours), Psychophysiological Recording, Part I (4 hours), surface EMG Applications, Part I (4 hours), Adjunctive Interventions, Part I (4 hours), and Autonomic Nervous System Applications, Part I (4 hours). In addition, the course will overview current scientific approaches to research on biofeedback, and will discuss several approaches for utilizing biofeedback in psychotherapy, in optimal performance training in sports and the arts, and in personal transformation. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 4110 - Coaching for Health and Wellness


    This course will provide students with an overview of the field of health and wellness, a comprehensive understanding of the principles of health and wellness coaching, an introduction to the science of lasting behavior change, and mentored practice in all of the core coaching skills and competencies defined by the International Coach Federation. In addition, this course will review current research studies documenting the effectiveness of health and wellness coaching in corporate wellness programs, hospitals, clinical practices, and through independent wellness coaching partnerships. This is a highly interactive and experiential class. Students who complete this course will have attained a basic level of competence in health and wellness coaching and will be prepared to integrate these skills into their current careers. This course will also provide those individuals interested in deepening their coaching skill set with a solid foundation to prepare them for more advanced courses in health and wellness coaching. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 4115 - Imagery for Health


    This course will review the place of imagery and the imagination in traditional healing practices, and the contemporary applications of imagery in healthcare. Students will review the experimental evidence for the impact of imagery on immune function, neurochemistry, and medical illness. Students will learn to utilize imagery as a diagnostic tool, as a medical rehearsal for coping, and as a therapeutic tool for medical illness and emotional disorders. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 4530 - Psychology, Religion, and Spirituality in Their Cultural Contexts


    This course provides an overview of the ways that religion and spirituality interact with psychology with special attention to the cultural context. This includes an exploration of various models for how religion and spirituality can relate to science and, in particular, psychology. Various models for psychology of religion and spirituality are considered, as well as models for integrating religion and spirituality with psychology. Psychology historically has had a complex relationship with religion, spirituality, and culture. The primary purpose of this course is to explore various models for the interrelationships of psychology, religion, and spirituality with special consideration given to the cultural influences upon these relationships. Consideration will be given to these domains (psychology, religion, spirituality, and culture) separately as well as from an integrated perspective. The course begins with an overview of definitions and exploration of epistemological issues relevant to how science and psychology can relate to religion and spirituality. The next section of the course explores various models for the psychology of religion, followed by a section on models for integrating psychology with religion and/or spirituality. The concluding sections of the course devote attention to the cultural contexts for the relationships between psychology, religion, and spirituality as well as consideration to applications of the psychology of religion and the integration of psychology with religion and spirituality. Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites.  Cross-listed with PSY 4530. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 6560 - Approaches to Socially Engaged Spirituality


    In the modern Western world, spirituality is often understood as private, subjective, and individual, as one’s primarily inward communion with what is seen as sacred, a communion that is not necessarily explicitly in relation to, or even connected with, one’s more outward and public life. In many traditional religious forms, the highest development of spirituality required leaving and having little to do with the everyday social world, whether as a monk or nun, hermit, wanderer, or a member of an intentional community. Socially engaged spirituality in its traditional and contemporary forms represents a different approach, in which spiritual qualities are developed in the context of involvement in family, work, community, society, and/or politics. This course explores the ideas of socially engaged spirituality through the lenses of many world religions, spiritual traditions, and psychological perspectives. Although offering an overview from many perspectives, students can focus on particular perspectives most relevant to their interests and/or work within the framework of the course. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 8151 - Practicum in Professional Practice


    This course is intended for students seeking practicum training not related to clinical practicum or the MFT program. Students are responsible for arranging the practicum and should consult their CSIH co-directors in order to identify a Saybrook faculty liaison. Prerequisite(s): Open only to students pursuing a CSIH certificate. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 8950 - Certificate Integrative Seminar


    The final part of the Certificate program is the integrative paper. The purpose of the integrative paper is to give the learner an opportunity to draw together the most important aspects of the Certificate courses, to assess strengths and identify further learning needs, and to develop a specific plan for continuing personal and professional work. Prerequisite(s): Open only to students pursuing a CSIH certificate. 1 credit(s)

Existential, Humanistic, and Transpersonal Psychology

  
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    EHTP 1080 - History and Systems of Psychology


    The objective of this course is to give the student an overview of the history of modern psychology in three streams in order to place more accurately the existential-humanistic and transpersonal movements in their proper context. The student will be expected to gain proficiency in the major events and personalities associated with each of the three streams, which include: 1) experimental psychology in the universities (i.e., the history of psychophysics, behaviorism, and cognitive psychology); 2) clinical psychology as both an academic and applied field (i.e., the history of largely depth-psychology, with an emphasis on the histories of Freud, Jung, Adler, and Erikson); and 3) existential-humanistic and transpersonal psychology, exemplified by the life and work of Carl Rogers, Abraham Maslow, and Rollo May. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 2000 - Foundations of Existential, Humanistic, and Transpersonal Psychology


    This course provides an overview of existential, humanistic, and transpersonal psychology including its history and origins, its current manifestations, its relation to Saybrook University, its contributions to various aspects of psychology including clinical practice, its critiques, and its possible future. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 2040 - Existential Psychotherapies


    The existential psychotherapist works with fundamental existential themes of human existence: death and freedom, choice and responsibility, isolation, relatedness, and meaning and mystery. These themes organize the basic structures with which human life is shaped and experienced, and therefore provide the context for an existential psychotherapy. This existential psychotherapy course explores clinical applications of existential theory to the human situation in individual and group therapy. As an introduction to existential psychotherapies, this course is in three parts: Part I (theory) lays out the historical and philosophical traditions that underlie existential psychotherapeutic practice; Part II (therapy) shows how existential therapy grows out of existential theory; and Part III (application) uses the case study method to consider how existential psychotherapy can be applied to a diverse set of problems and clientele. Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 2045 - Existential-Humanistic Therapy: Experiential I


    istential-Humanistic Institute website at www.ehinstitute.org and click on “Certificate programs.” This skill development course and the next has specific learning objectives: (a) how to cultivate personal and relational presence, (b) how to attend to intrapsychic and interpersonal processes, (c) how to illuminate personal life meanings, (d) how to cultivate a therapeutic relationship that effects change, (e) how to work with transference and counter transference within an existential context, (f) how to work existentially with resistance, and (g) how to recognize and work with existential life issues which may be present but disguised. Instructors will teach the principles of the e-h approach through live and video demonstrations, experiential exercises, and dyad work. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 2046 - Existential-Humanistic Therapy: Experiential II


    This course is the second of two four-day experiential courses given by Existential-Humanistic Institute/Saybrook instructors as part of the Certificate program leading to a Certificate in the Foundations of Existential-Humanistic Practice. This Certificate program requires that both Part I and Part II be taken sequentially. The courses will be held off site, EHTP 2045  in October and EHTP 2046 in March. For specific dates and more information visit the Existential-Humanistic Institute website at www.ehinstitute.org., click on “Certificate programs.” Experiential courses I and II will offer some theory but will primarily focus on skill development. The existential- humanistic approach will be taught in live and video demonstrations, experiential exercises, and dyad work. An overarching assumption of the e-h approach is that it is the client’s in the moment experiencing that forms both the underlying and actual process of therapy. This assumption anchors the existential practitioner in the principles of practice that focus on experience over explanation and process over content. This skill development, experiential course EHTP 2046 builds on experiential course EHTP 2045  by deepening the student’s ability to cultivate therapeutic presence, to attend to both intrapsychic and interpersonal processes, to recognize and illuminate personal life meanings, to cultivate a safe and intimate therapeutic relationship, to work with transference and counter transference within an existential context, to work existentially with resistance, and to recognize and work with existential life issues which may be present but disguised. By gaining competency in these fundamental principles, the student will have a solid skill set for effective practice and have a foundation from which additional approaches such as a cognitive-behavioral one can be employed. The Certificate program is intended as a mentoring experience that emphasizes the development of the practitioner as a whole person, appreciating that clinical practice is an art as much as a science. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 2047 - Existential Psychotherapies III: James Bugental and the Existential-Humanistic Tradition


    This course will be of interest to students who want to explore existential-humanistic psychotherapy as understood by James Bugental, one of psychology’s most respected and talented practitioners. Bugental held that life’s existential contingencies could often overwhelm causing a loss of centeredness, agency, and self-directedness. By focusing in the here-and-now, Bugental intended to promote inner presence, agency, and responsibility assumption in a client. Bugental’s experiential approach is both powerful and effective-and is rarely found in traditional therapies. Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 2048 - The Existential/Humanistic/Transpersonal Psychology of Ernest Becker


    The cultural anthropologist Ernest Becker was an astonishingly brilliant thinker and writer who was interdisciplinary in the truest sense. With a surpassing fund of knowledge and a uniquely passionate and penetrating mind, Becker roamed freely through seeming libraries of works in sociology, anthropology, political science, ethology, psychoanalysis, psychology, religion, and the broader humanities so as to articulate stunning cultural, existential-humanistic, and spiritual truths. Becker understood, like William James and Otto Rank before him, that the fundamental problems in life are existential rather than instinctive. Human beings are conflicted not so much because of sexual or aggressive drives but because we know too much. We have evolved into creatures who think, a simultaneously mortifying and exhilarating occurrence when we consider the implications of what it means to be briefly alive on a planet that spins on the periphery of a single galaxy within the Infinite. We are, in a sense, effete animals who strive interminably to limit overexposure. Although the risks are self-evident, the untold possibilities are ultimately uppermost in Becker’s searching and visionary mind. In reading Becker’s seminal works, we will consider the universal mind and pervasive humanism of one of the most original and ethically-attuned native psychologists of our time. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 2049 - Terror Management Theory: Foundations, Critique, and Applications


    Terror Management Theory (TMT) developed as a social psychological theory emerging out of the work of the social anthropologist, author, and Pulitzer Prize recipient Ernest Becker. TMT, considered an existential approach to social psychology, has garnered considerable support in the research literature and has been applied to a number of important social issues—terrorism, violence, and religious prejudice among them. This present course will review the theory of and research on terror management and will incorporate a critique of its limitations as well. Consideration will be given to TMT understood in the broader context of Ernest Becker’s overarching work as well as resonant other existential theorists and theories. Students will be encouraged to consider ways that TMT can be meaningfully applied to research and contemporary social issues. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 2055 - Existential Psychology, Philosophy, and Literature


    Existential psychology emerged, in part, from existential psychology. Throughout its development, the various approaches to existential psychology have been profoundly influenced by philosophy and literature. This course helps students develop a deeper foundation for their psychological theory and application through exploration of the philosophical and literary roots of the existential psychology movement. The course will include discussion of the influential philosophers including Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, Sartre, Heidegger, and Hegel, amongst others. From the literary perspectives, the contributions of Camus, Kafka, and Dostoyevsky are reviewed. Contemporary philosophical and literary perspectives will also be considered. While all students will be introduced to both literary and philosophical perspectives, after the initial introduction students can elect to focus primarily on literature or philosophy for the final portion of the course. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 2065 - International Psychology


    This course provides an overview of international psychology, including practicing psychology in an international context and the importance of knowledge derived from international psychology for local practice. Students will be prepared to critique Western psychology from an international perspective and adapt knowledge and skills derived from Western psychology to be practiced in a culturally sensitive manner in an international context. Students will develop knowledge relevant to ethical and cultural issues in conducting psychology in an international setting. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 3070 - Eastern Psychologies


    This course first asks students to consider how the orientations of Eastern psychologies illuminate and are coming into relationship with Western psychology. Looking at major developments in (among others) Buddhist, Hindu/Yogic, and Taoist thought and history, students will gain a broad, working knowledge of the meaning and substance of major Eastern psychology principles as well as their potential therapeutic values. With this working knowledge in hand, the course has students consider the promise and limitations of contemporary Western applications, adaptations, and research assessments of Eastern psychologies. Finally, students are invited to participate in an experiential project from which they will gain first-hand embodied and intuitive knowledge, insight that cannot be obtained simply through studying the literature. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 3075 - The Life and Work of Alan Watts


    This course considers the life and work of Alan Watts (1915-1973), early pioneer in the emergence of humanistic and transpersonal psychology. Students will consider Watts’s ideas in the context of his chronological biography by reading In My Own Way, his autobiographical statement, while at the same time reading and discussing Watts’s major writings during different periods of his career. Particular attention will be paid to the correlation between life events and major ideas, to Watt’s contribution to the development of humanistic and transpersonal psychology, to his contribution to East/West psychology, and to an assessment of his influence on the fields of religious studies, philosophy, on psychology at large, on the practice of psychotherapy, and to his place in the psychotherapeutic counter-culture. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 3080 - C. G. Jung: His Life, Work, and Contemporary Perspectives in Analytical Psychology


    The course offers an overview of the life and times of Carl Gustav Jung, in cultural context from 1875 to 1961, through autobiography and recent critical biography. It provides an introduction to the core constructs of his theories of personality, psychoanalysis and psychotherapy, and post-Jungian extensions and critiques of his work in Analytical psychology that include areas of neuroscience, attachment theory, spirituality, and cultural complex theories. The course is offered to all students interested in the life and work of C.G. Jung across degree programs and Schools. It provides a strong theoretical foundation that supports and facilitates cohesive assimilation of aspects of his theories and work found in other courses offered at Saybrook. The course serves as a bridge to the in-depth study of Jung’s classical work, the Collected Works of C.G. Jung, and the recently published Red Book. This latter work provides foreground and the background for Jung’s original work, born from his creative and critical self-analysis. The course can serve as a portal to research, theory application, and professional practice in cross-cultural and multicultural psychology. Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 3110 - Psychoneurology of Learning Disorders


    This course focuses on learning disabilities from a psychoneurological perspective. It is also designed to help develop a humanistic perspective on learning disabilities and better understand the behavior of individuals who have been given the “learning disabilities” label. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 3140 - Phenomenological Critique of Psychological Systems


    Modern mainstream psychology also developed amorphously, some 30 years after its beginnings it fractionated into various schools: Structuralism, Behaviorism, Psychoanalysis, Gestalt Theory, and Cognitive Psychology. Each of these schools helped to expand psychology from its narrow beginnings, but they also followed, in various degrees, the natural science criteria. The argument of the course is that with a different philosophical basis these newer developments might have given psychology a more adequate frame of reference and a more solid foundation for its work with human beings. Thus a foundational critique of these systems of psychology can throw light on alternative directions for psychology. This course when delivered by a phenomenologist adopts descriptive phenomenology as an alternative framework, but other professors might choose a different basis for the constructive alternative. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 3160 - Personal Mythology and Dreamwork


    In this course, students will learn what is meant by the term “personal mythology. They will be introduced to the idea that every person develops a particular personal mythology that guides and influences his or her perceptions, thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. They will be introduced to the primary factors that seem to be responsible for the development of particular personal mythologies (e.g., a person’s genetic inheritance, family of origin, kinship group, and social milieu). The course can be taken with an experiential emphasis, an academic emphasis, or a mixture of these. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 3205 - Spiritual Direction


    This course provides a professional, academic, and personal introduction to spiritual direction (often called spiritual guidance) as a profession and as a support to other professions. The primary goal of this course is to explore the role of spiritual direction within and outside spiritual traditions. Students will be introduced to foundational definitions, concepts, dynamics, and processes in this developing field. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 3220 - The African Diaspora: African American Cultural History and Psychology


    This first in a sequence of courses on the African Diaspora will focus on the definition, constituents, and historiography of the African Diaspora and greater comprehension of the cultural history and psychology of persons with African ancestry, through the lens of African and African-American psychology. Selected texts for the course have been written by African, African-Caribbean, and African-American scholars. The methodological approach to the study of the African Diaspora is interdisciplinary and draws to the foreground historiography, depth psychology, economics of capitalism, law, mythology, religion, art history, and anthropology for construction of an ancestral ethno-cultural narrative of the African Diaspora against the background of world cultural history. The course content and approach should open and cultivate, through critical thinking, a worldview and means to deconstruct, analyze, comprehend, and reconstruct complex sets of human relations in the African Diaspora from global, regional, national, and personal perspectives. It should allow us to see how the archetype of culture is actualized within institutions, living micro-systems, and psychodynamics of the Diaspora. The specific focus of this course is on African-American cultural history, psychology, and experience from origins in Africa, the Middle Passage, bondage, civil and psychological reconstruction, the Civil Rights movement, Pan-Africanism, and Negritude in America, Europe, the Caribbean, and Africa, Affirmative Action, African-American family life, demographics, health/mental health, illness, spirituality, resilience, and optimal development. Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 3500 - Humanistic Psychology and Psychotherapy


    This course is intended to provide an introduction to and overview of humanistic psychology, including its origins and tributaries, its historical interrelations with Saybrook, and the possibilities that inhere for its future evolution and significance. We will consider, especially, humanistic psychology’s spheres of influence in the arena of psychotherapy but also in education and upon culture considered more broadly. Humanistic psychology’s critiques of alternate perspectives will be taken up, no less than those that have been leveled at humanistic psychology itself. The course will include an introduction to the writings of a triumvirate of founding parents - Carl Rogers, Abraham Maslow, and Rollo May - as well a consideration of their precursors and the ongoing work of simpatico voices in sister disciplines: Maya Angelou in literature, for example, and Robert Coles in psychiatry. One or two films resonant with core humanistic values/themes will also be included, as will John Coltrane’s sublime 1964 jazz recording, A Love Supreme. The impulse that informs humanistic psychology speaks in various voices. We shall take time in this course to savor its several expressions and callings. Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 3510 - Transpersonal Psychology and Psychotherapy


    Transpersonal Psychology and Psychotherapy investigates human experiences that transcend the ordinary, particularly spiritual experiences and altered states of consciousness. This course reviews the Western roots of transpersonal psychology in the works of William James, Carl Jung, and Abraham Maslow. It also examines the relationship of transpersonal psychology to spiritual traditions, including shamanism, Buddhism, and Hinduism, as well as mythology and other forms of spiritual investigations. Transpersonal clinical approaches in therapy and research methods are also addressed. Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 3515 - Foundations of Phenomenological Psychology


    Phenomenological psychological research is rooted in a rich tradition of philosophical and psychological thought. This course offers students an overview of the philosophical background and critique of mainstream psychology that underlies phenomenological psychology. Students will survey the philosophy of Husserl and Merleau-Ponty and read Giorgi’s landmark book, Psychology as a Human Science, which exemplifies the re-envisioning of psychology along phenomenological and humanistic lines. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 3520 - Multicultural Perspectives on Death and Loss


    The way individuals experience death and loss is strongly influenced by culture as well as religious and spiritual beliefs. In this course, a variety of different cultural, spiritual, and religious perspectives on death and loss will be explored. Additionally, the course will explore ways individuals in helping roles can work with death and loss in a culturally-sensitive manner. Special attention will be given to existential, humanistic, and transpersonal perspectives to working with cultural differences pertaining to death and loss. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 3525 - Microaggressions: An Existential, Humanistic, and Transpersonal Perspective


    One of the most difficult feelings to rid oneself of is the emotional turmoil associated with being denigrated by a person or group in a position of power. Feelings of anger and confusion are often followed with those of inferiority. The internal struggle is exacerbated when it seems obvious that the perpetrator had no ill-intent in conveying the denigrating message. Society is replete with these microaggressions that more often than not go unnoticed yet have a lasting impact on the recipient. This course will define and explore common microaggressions, how they are manifested, and how to respond. Particular attention is given to existential, humanistic, and transpersonal perspectives on microaggressions as well as ways even these perspectives may, at times, also inadvertently perpetuate microaggressions. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 3535 - Death, Loss, and Meaning in Existential Psychology


    This course is designed to introduce students to how existential philosophers and psychologists approach and work with the themes of death, loss, and meaning. Death and loss are considered in both their literal and symbolic forms, which encompasses losses associated with many different life transitions. Themes such as transience, impermanence, detachment, and meaning-making will be explored in depth in a professional, clinical, and personal manner. The students will be introduced to the work of philosophers, sociologists, doctors, psychologists, and creative writers as they confront how finitude is an inescapable aspect of our existence. Students will be encouraged to integrate academic theory with personal reflection and application. Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 3540 - Foundations of Hermeneutic Psychology


    The word hermeneutics comes from Greek ἐρμηνεύς (ermēneús, “translator, interpreter”); hermeneutics is the theory of textual interpretation. In this course I will examine how hermeneutics as a philosophical theory relates to psychology. The objective is to understand from a theoretical point of view how much psychological method has to do with interpretation. Therefore we will examine the philosophical texts of Husserl, Ricoeur, Habermas and Zahavi in order to clarify the foundations of psychological research method from a hermeneutic perspective. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 3600 - Carl and Natalie Rogers: A Father-Daughter Legacy of the Person-Centered Approach


    , and the legacy he passed on to her. It covers the person-centered philosophy and research of Carl Rogers and Natalie Rogers’s person-entered approach to expressive arts and her unique process called the Creative Connection. This course lays the groundwork for understanding the philosophical roots of Natalie Rogers’s model of experiential learning and how the creative process puts us in touch with our soul, our spirit, and our inner wisdom. Students will learn how Natalie Rogers’s work in Person-Centered Expressive Arts Therapy promotes self-expression through the creative arts - movement, art, music, and writing, and how it focuses on the inner journey through a creative process fostered by a safe, accepting, non-judgmental, person-centered environment. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 3605 - Kabbalah and Transpersonal Psychology


    The objective of this course is to give an overview of the Kabbalah-the esoteric offshoot of Judaism-and its contemporary relevance for transpersonal psychology. The major teachings of the Kabbalah and Hasidism will be presented concerning human personality and growth, as well as classic methods such as meditation for awakening intuition, creativity, and other higher potentialities. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 3610 - Transpersonal Neuroscience


    This course examines transpersonal states of consciousness as seen through the eyes of contemporary transpersonal psychology and brain science and the controversies that surround these topics. Sections of the course will examine the nature of consciousness itself, in brain science as well as the philosophy of mind and transpersonal psychology, and explore in nontechnical ways the fundamentals of transpersonal neuroscience and consciousness, looking toward how this approach sheds light on spirituality and higher states of awareness. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 3615 - Existential Psychology and Literature


    Kafka, it is clear, read Freud. What might have happened had Freud read Kafka? What if psychology had inclined from the start-as William James, Otto Rank, and Rollo May had urged-toward literary and intuitive epistemologies and conceptions of the mind as it sketched out its apparent topography? Modernist European writers like Pirandello, Woolf, Kafka, Musil, Beckett, and Broch were native psychological geniuses who understood reflexively that existence and psychology could not be systematized-precisely why they opted for fiction and sometimes essay as their preferred methodologies. “No longer joy in certainty but in uncertainty,” exhorted the forward-looking Nietzsche; “No longer ‘cause and effect’ but the continually creative.” In this course, we shall consider selections from the work of some of these modernist masters and several others as well and, so, open up to the crossroads between literature, awareness, world, and the mind. We will be considering, in effect, a gathering of “existential soundings” and thereby inquiring into that, arguably, that only the literary sensibility can say. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 4530 - Psychology, Religion, and Spirituality in Their Cultural Contexts


    This course provides an overview of the ways that religion and spirituality interact with psychology with special attention to the cultural context. This includes an exploration of various models for how religion and spirituality can relate to science and, in particular, psychology. Various models for psychology of religion and spirituality are considered, as well as models for integrating religion and spirituality with psychology. Psychology historically has had a complex relationship with religion, spirituality, and culture. The primary purpose of this course is to explore various models for the interrelationships of psychology, religion, and spirituality with special consideration given to the cultural influences upon these relationships. Consideration will be given to these domains (psychology, religion, spirituality, and culture) separately as well as from an integrated perspective. The course begins with an overview of definitions and exploration of epistemological issues relevant to how science and psychology can relate to religion and spirituality. The next section of the course explores various models for the psychology of religion, followed by a section on models for integrating psychology with religion and/or spirituality. The concluding sections of the course devote attention to the cultural contexts for the relationships between psychology, religion, and spirituality as well as consideration to applications of the psychology of religion and the integration of psychology with religion and spirituality. Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 4535 - The Use of Poetry with Death, Loss, and Life Transition


    The creative arts are often used to assist people facing death, loss, and other important life transitions. Similarly, these life events often cause individuals to reflect upon the meaning in their life and seek to create new meaning, which can be aided by poetry and the creative arts. This course focuses on the use of poetry when encountering death, loss, and life transitions. Students are encouraged to reflect upon their own use of creativity in times of difficult life transitions. Additionally, students will explore ways to facilitate the use of poetry with others facing life transitions. Poems from various cultural backgrounds are considered.  Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. Cross-listed with CS 4535 and PSY 4535. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 6150 - Existential Psychotherapies II: Rollo May and the Existential Tradition


    Rollo May was the founding parent of existential-humanistic psychology and a pivotal figure in what we may call philosophical/psychological rapprochement. His books, byproducts of a profound disposition and wide-ranging literacy and curiosity, encourage a rich dialogue between philosophy and psychology and the broader humanities. May expresses concretely what he believed from the time of his earliest work: that psychology requires a grounded, theoretically cogent, interdisciplinary approach to human nature. His books remain an auspicious place to start for those interested in learning about what psychology at its most esoteric can be. In this course, we will consider Rollo May’s work and legacy attentively, thereby glimpsing what psychology at its most visionary and rarified might be. Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 8151 - Practicum in Professional Practice


    This course is intended for students seeking practicum training not related to clinical practicum or the MFT program. Students are responsible for arranging the practicum and should consult the director of the EHTP Specialization in order to identify a Saybrook faculty liaison. Prerequisite(s): Open only to students pursuing an EHTP certificate. 3 credit(s)
  
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    EHTP 8950 - Certificate Integrative Seminar


    The final part of the Certificate is the integrative paper. The purpose of the integrative paper is to give the learner an opportunity to draw together the most important aspects of the Certificate courses, to assess strengths and identify further learning needs, and to develop a specific plan for continuing personal and professional work. Prerequisite(s): Open only to students pursuing an EHTP certificate. 1 credit(s)

Human Science

  
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    HS 1001 - History and Philosophy of the Human Sciences


    This is an introductory course tracing the development of the Human Science approach to the understanding of human thought, experience, institutions, and cultures. It begins with a review of the historical discussions about the nature of knowledge and how we know (epistemology) and the question about whether the natural or “standard” science model is sufficient to understand the subjective and intersubjective facets of human life. It examines the contributions of some of the early initiators of the human science dialogue, including Dilthy, Gadamer, Weber, and Husserl and the expansion of the human science dialogue through critical theory, structuralism, feminism, and postmodernism. The relation of Human Science to humanistic and transpersonal viewpoints, to the natural and social sciences, humanities, studies in religion and spirituality and to mainstream psychology and psychiatry are also considered. The various methods of inquiry that have been developed as a result of this ongoing endeavor to understand the complexities and nuances of human experience are described here, but explored in more detail in the Theories of Inquiry and Critical Theories in the Human Sciences courses. 3 credit(s)
  
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    HS 1605 - Writing, Film, and Representation in the Human Sciences


    This course explores a variety of ways that individual, social, cultural, and political representations are depicted in various forms of writing and films. The questions are important to all those who seek to understand and interpret the reality of both self and other. Who writes and represents whom? How are the “Self” and the “Other” represented in the human sciences and what are some critiques of representation? Various approaches to self-representation and the representation of others will be explored. Autoethnography, ethnoautobiography, memoir, ethnography, fiction, and biography as represented in film and written forms will be examined and discussed. Students will have reading, writing, and film viewing assignments to enable them to engage fully with the meaning of representation. 3 credit(s)
  
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    HS 1615 - Story, Self, and Society


    The stories we believe - personal, national, religious, and cultural - shape our lives every day as we make choices at multiple levels from the individual to international bodies. As neuroscientists build on the ancient intuition that we tell stories to know ourselves and the world in which we live, this course will help develop an understanding of what that means for us as individuals and as members of specific communities and as members of the larger natural community. We will refer to the work of many past and current scholars from a variety of disciplines, including philosophers, historians, literary critics, psychologists, ethologists, primatologists, and other social scientists. We will also review how story is being used in business, in education, and in politics to shape ideas of self and society. This course is also an excellent foundation for RES 4005 - Narrative and Auto/Biographical Research , where stories become our texts for learning about the nuances of being human. Understanding the historical legacy of stories and the contemporary research how our pattern seeking brains create stories may deepen the narrative researcher’s understanding as they collect and analyze narrative data. 3 credit(s)
  
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    HS 1620 - Whole Systems: From Bertalanffy to Bateson and Beyond


    Aristotle is reputed to have said, “the whole is greater than the sum of its parts,” but that perspective on the inter-relationship of things was not reclaimed in the West until the development of systems thinking in the 20th century. We now realize that it is essential to ground our thinking about being human in an understanding of the systems, natural and social, that are the context of human experience. This course includes some earlier ideas about the universe and interconnectedness, but the evolution of systems theory really begins in the 1940s with Karl Ludwig von Bertalanffy and the origins of General Systems Theory (GST). Ervin László and the development of evolutionary systems theory and the transition to the Human Systems Theory of Erich Jantsch and Conrad Waddington are explored and the natural and human systems thinking of Gregory Bateson is introduced with its application to current systems thinking and current research approaches to addressing environmental and social change challenges. 3 credit(s)
  
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    HS 6140 - Ethics for the Human Sciences


    This course examines Western and Eastern ethical theories discussing the concepts and ethical problems that social science researchers may encounter. The course considers ‘morality in practice’ examining the nature of professional ethics and the challenges professionals face, and discussing a variety of ethical issues such as euthanasia, abortion, sexuality, preferential treatment, the distribution of wealth and income, animal rights, punishment and responsibility, terrorism, war, and nuclear deterrence. Issues related to various human and social science disciplines are analyzed and the ethical aims and moral shortcomings of human and social science theories, methodologies, policies, and practices are investigated. 3 credit(s)
  
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    HS 6580 - Cultural Criticism


    Cultural criticism is a recent synthesis of work in anthropology, literary criticism, feminist studies, cultural and intellectual history, African-American studies, semiotics, philosophy, political studies, and many other disciplines. Its foci are on the understandings and practices that comprise our subjectivity and the contexts of our daily lives; how those understandings and practices are institutionalized, legitimized, and rationalized; how they shape our experiences and interactions with ourselves, our intimate relationships, and contemporary American society. The course examines the identity of knowledge and power as expressed in the media, psychotherapy, medicine, education, prisons, and language. 3 credit(s)
  
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    HS 6581 - Human Science Studies: Religion, Politics, Science, and Culture


    We will approach this topic from the perspective of cultural/social narratives and how those stories shape our approach to contemporary social problems. We will begin with a brief review of the origins of belief and ritual systems from the perspectives of Anthropology and Sociology through the development of historical and contemporary religious expressions in traditional religions and cults. We will explore a variety of beliefs and rituals associated with a number of World religions, including Christianity, Buddhism, Islam, and others. With this foundation, we will investigate the relationship between these religious perspectives and contemporary political debates on personal morality, social responsibility, the role of science in public policy, international relations, world peace, and other social issues. We will not focus on theological issues, except incidentally as we consider religion in the context of various cultures. 3 credit(s)
  
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    HS 6583 - Human Science Studies: Class, Race, and Gender


    This course provides a foundation to study contemporary social problems related to issues of class, race, and gender. Basic readings develop the theoretical and historical foundation of these issues in terms of Western culture, and the United States in particular. Concepts of class are at the core of analyzing social structures and systems and from the Human Science perspective, particularly, the analysis of power arrangements. The concept of race and the practices of racism are some of the most enduring aspects of the human condition. Similarly, concepts of gender shape individual and cultural arrangements between the sexes and influence both individual freedom and social policy. Here we clarify these terms and review theory and current knowledge associated with each and their intersections in different domains. Students can choose to study any of these and their impact in various settings, for example, in business, politics, education, health, religion, criminal justice, or government, with a focus on facilitating transformative change. 3 credit(s)
  
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    HS 7570 - Critical Theories for the Human Sciences


    Critical Theories in the Human Sciences takes a broad view beginning with the European philosophical roots of Critical Theory and then exploring critical theories arising from post- modernism, deconstructionism, and contemporary theories from the social sciences and humanities. Some themes to be addressed are: culture and identity; the politics of race and gender; public and private behavior in the Internet era; neuroscience and western philosophy; and how to negotiate relationships in an ethical and enriching manner in a multi-national, multi-cultural global environment. 3 credit(s)
  
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    HS 9200 - Master’s Project (M.A.)


    This course is designed for students who intend to complete a master’s degree culminating project that will not involve the use of human participants in any way (e.g., an expanded literature review; developing an intervention or program, but without implementation or piloting in any way; writing a training manual based on theory only, etc.). For HS 9200, no committee is formed; that is, the course has one instructor only. In addition, the student does not need to go through the Institutional Review Board review and approval process for this course nor is there a project oral examination attached. If opting for HS 9200, the course supervisor must be a member of the Human Science degree program faculty or someone approved by the Department director. 3 credit(s)

Jungian Studies

  
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    JS xxxx - TBD


    February 12 & 13, 2016 TBD
  
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    JS 8808 - Psychology, Religion, and the East


    Volume 11 of the Collected Works of C.G. Jung contains shorter works on psychotherapy and religion. Part 1 focuses on western religion, while part two contains essays on eastern traditions, including commentaries on The Tibetan Book of the Great Liberation, The Tibetan Book of the Dead, The Psychology of Eastern Meditation, and an introduction that Jung prepared for Suzuki’s classic Introduction to Zen Buddhism. This class will include readings from this volume and focus with particular attention to Jung’s essay “The Secret of The Golden Flower” from CW Volume 15. This course explores the historical/cultural context of C.G. Jung’s considerations of Eastern belief systems, similarities and differences in Jungian psychology and beliefs and practices of Hinduism and Buddhism, and compares concepts such as mindfulness, maya, and enlightenment with psychological concepts such as active imagination, projection, and individuation. November 13 & 14, 2015 1 credit(s)
  
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    JS 8817 - The Development of Personality


    Jung thought of individuation as a “vocation,” having archetypal roots, and saw it as a “calling” and expressed as a mythic drama. He also understood the consequences of both following and refusing that call. Through an in-depth study of Jung’s essay on “The Development of Personality” (Vol. 17 of the CW), this course considers Jung’s seminal idea of “individuation” in relation to the archetypal ideal of “personality.” We will examine how personality develops in the context of Jung’s psychological theory, as well as the influences that incline us towards or away from individuation in our own lives. October 9 & 10, 2015 1 credit(s)
  
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    JS 8819 - Mysterium Coniunctionis


    Mysterium Coniunctionis, Volume 14 of the Collected Works of C.G. Jung, presents Jung’s last great work, on which he was engaged for more than a decade, from 1941 to 1954. He finished it in his 80th year. As is to be expected from its culminating position in his writings and from its subject matter, the book gives a final account of his lengthy researches into alchemy. Jung’s interest in the symbolical significance of alchemy for modern depth psychology, his interest in the coniunctio as it relates to the psychology of the transference, and the relation between alchemy and Christianity were concerns throughout his working life. All these themes are brought together in Mysterium Coniuntionis, where Jung continues his work of interpretation by examining in detail a number of texts taken from the alchemical classics. The scope of the book is indicated in its subtitle: “An Inquiry into the Separation and Synthesis of Psychic Opposites in Alchemy.” This process, summed up in the trenchant formula solve et coagula - “dissolve and coagulate” - underlines the opus alchymicum and may be symbolically understood as the process of psychic integration. December 11 & 12, 2015 1 credit(s)
  
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    JS 8822 - The Red Book


    ddition to losing Freud’s friendship, Jung also resigned from his teaching at the University of Zurich. He went into a period of intense introversion, only seeing his clients and his family. Much of his time was spent with visions and dreams from the unconscious flooding his ego consciousness at that time. The publication of this book has been very exciting for the Jungian world as many of us thought it would never be published. The content is so private and personal. This book will rank among the finest of spiritual and psychological autobiographies like the work of St. Theresa of Avila, Erasmus, and Hildegard of Bingen, among others. Jung confronts the unconscious and comes out a changed person with a new understanding of how we must learn to relate to the unconscious. April 8 & 9, 2016 1 credit(s)
  
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    JS 8829 - The Spirit in Man, Art, and Literature


    Volume 15 of the Collected Works of C.G. Jung is comprised of nine essays of general rather than technical interest. In these papers, written between 1922 and 1941, Jung’s attention was directed mainly to the qualities of personality that enabled the creative spirit to introduce radical innovations into realms as diverse as medicine, psychoanalysis, Oriental studies, the visual arts, and literature. Essays on Paracelsus, Freud, the sinologist Richard Wilhelm, Picasso, and James Joyce’s Ulysses are supplemented by two others that consider artistic creativity generally and explore its source in archetypal structures. January 8 & 9, 2016 1 credit(s)
  
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    JS 8850 - Post-Jungian Seminar on the Work of Edward Edinger


    This seminar will study the seminal post-Jungian text by Edward Edinger, Ego and Archetype, as well as his book Transformation of Libido. Ego and Archetype presents the “individual’s journey to psychological wholeness, known in analytical psychology as the process of individuation. Edinger traces the stages in this process and relates them to the search for meaning through encounters with symbolism in religion, myth, dreams, and art. For contemporary men and women, Edinger believes, the encounter with the self is equivalent to the discovery of God. The result of the dialogue between the ego and the archetypal image of God is an experience that dramatically changes the individual’s worldview and makes possible a new and more meaningful way of life.” Transformation of Libido: A Seminar on C.G. Jung’s Symbols of Transformation describes the hazards to the ego and self and further explores Jung’s ideas of the role of libido, or life energy, in the process of individuation. The class will work with the archetype of the pilgrimage as an expression of the unfolding of consciousness and transformation of libido in the journey along the ego-self axis. Each student will write and present a paper to the class with a short period of discussion following. March 11 & 12, 2016 1 credit(s)
  
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    JS 8900 - Jungian Studies Capstone Project


    The capstone paper requires students to demonstrate the ability to pursue a topic focusing on Jungian and/or analytic subject matter. This paper should include a clear thesis to be addressed, or a comparative study (e.g., Freud versus Jung on a particular topic), or symbolic analysis of a text or cultural form. Additionally, students will demonstrate knowledge of other applicable literature on their subject, as well as independent thinking and research. Prerequisite(s): Open only to students pursuing a Jungian Studies certificate. 1 credit(s)

MA in Management

  
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    MAM 8000 - Organizational Systems & Culture


    Leaders in all sectors encounter complex systems that directly impact culture in organizations. They are challenged to co-create models and systems that sufficiently address the complexity while poising the organization to meet future challenges. This course explores the leadership and organization behaviors through multiple lenses and in various contexts. It critically examines the dimensions of system and culture that leaders must navigate. 3 credit(s)
  
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    MAM 8001 - Global Economies, Markets, and Supply Chains


    With the emergence of interdependent worldwide economies, business organizations are shifting from envisioning themselves as highly competitive international businesses to profitable sustainable global enterprises. This mindset gives rise to new business strategies, financial management principles, collaborative forms of inter-organizational partnerships and alliances, and innovative operational processes, including sustainable approaches to gaining and serving global markets, managing global supply chains and reaching business goals. 3 credit(s)
  
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    MAM 8002 - Foundations of Leadership & Management


    This course grounds students in classic and emerging theories of leadership and management. They will explore a range of core concepts required to move from theory to skillful practice. Students will be encouraged to explore and expand their understanding of their own practices of leadership and management. Further, they will consider the concepts in a variety of organizational settings. 3 credit(s)
  
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    MAM 8003 - Dispersed Workforce Characteristics, Environments, and Issues


    Managing a global workforce requires a wide variety of leadership qualities and talent management skills including the ability to identify, understand, analyze, and address complex workplace issues from a social systems perspective. It also involves developing a cosmopolitan mindset and understanding how world issues impact the organization’s operations and workplace dynamics. This course examines the core characteristics of a global workforce and the complex business, political, economic and social issues that managers routinely face while developing students’ leadership and managerial skills in creatively resolving challenging workplace situations in an ethical and sustainable manner. 3 credit(s)
  
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    MAM 8004 - Talent Management Principles, Practices & Contemporary Issues


    While technology has a commanding presence in the business landscape, leaders recognize that the organization’s talent is its most valuable asset. This course introduces the fundamental theories and practices of talent management. This includes a focus on essential elements including employee development, succession planning, and employee engagement. Students will be introduced to best practices in talent management that they will be able to apply in their practice of leadership and management. 3 credit(s)
  
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    MAM 8005 - Managing Across Cultures


    While critically examining inter-cultural managerial concepts and challenges, this course has a “practical application” format, providing students an opportunity to creatively experiment with and practically apply the concepts and practices examined in MAM 8003 & 8008 to organizational settings. It enables the further development of students’ own global leadership perspectives while integrating new learning into their professional management approaches and workplace practices. With emotional and cultural intelligence as a background, there is a particular focus on how to realistically address the challenges created by distributed organizations and a global workforce, including how to effectively communicate across cultures, develop vibrant intercultural work environments, collaborative work relationships and teams, and address cross-cultural workplace conflict. 3 credit(s)
  
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    MAM 8006 - Organizational Communication Systems & Strategic Partnerships


    Organizations are complex, ever-evolving systems of networks, partnerships and alliances. Leaders are responsible for both navigating and co-creating these webs.  This course examines the many facets organizational communication systems and the ways in which they impact the formation and furtherance of strategic partnerships. The course will explore the roles that leaders play in the dissemination of information and creation of dialogue. Students will delve into the critical role that strategic partnerships play in organizations of all types. They will learn how to formulate and leverage partnerships that advance their organizations’ missions. 3 credit(s)
  
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    MAM 8007 - Strategic Information Systems, Knowledge Ecologies, and Technology


    A business enterprise has to structure consciously its communication, information, decision support, and knowledge management systems and processes so they support a distributed organizational structure and way of conducting business in a global context. This includes managing an organization’s supply chain, plus building and maintaining customer relationships and providing customer service. Utilizing an inter-organizational perspective and knowledge ecology framework, this course examines how to design innovative intra- and inter-organizational business structures and work systems. It also explores how to deploy information, communication and collaboration technology to engage business partners and motivate knowledge workers, how to foster collaborative organizational networks and cross-cultural teams, and how to promote efficient and effective decision making and daily operations. 3 credit(s)
  
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    MAM 8008 - Social Network Analysis, Partnership Facilitation, and Conflict Resolution


    While critically examining managerial concepts and challenges related to establishing engaged social networks in a distributed organization, this course has a “practical application” format, providing students an opportunity to creatively experiment with and practically apply the concepts and practices examined in MAM 8003 & 8005 to organizational settings. It enables the further development of students’ own virtual global perspectives while integrating new learning into their existing professional management approaches and workplace practices. With organizational behavior and social psychology as the background, there is a particular focus on how managers can develop vibrant knowledge sharing organizational dynamics, establish organizational partnerships, analyze organizational networks, implement innovative virtual work environments and meetings, and handle organizational conflict. 3 credit(s)
  
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    MAM 8010 - Communication & Group Dynamics


    Organizations function through networks of formal and informal communication and group dynamics. This course exposes students to the complexity of social systems and networks of relationships within organizations. The course explores the nature of group behavior and group dynamics. Theories of communication and group dynamics are examined through a critical lens. Students examine approaches to managerial communication and the impact of those approaches on outcomes. They examine challenges inherent in building sustainable collaboration. 3 credit(s)
  
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    MAM 8011 - Transforming Organizations: Principles of Change & Development


    Forward-focused leaders must be able to advance successful change agendas and build the requisite alliances for transformations to occur.  In this course students explore the interplay between organizational learning, innovation and transformation. They learn multiple theoretical approaches to change and the challenges that each approach presents in actual practice. Further, students explore the role of individual and organizational resilience. The course addresses the impact of resistance, resource allocations, and conflict on organizational transformations.  3 credit(s)
  
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    MAM 8012 - Socially Responsible Accounting and Financial Management


    This course provides managers with a background to aid in making decisions about the management of assets and the financing of organizational growth. It sets foundations in current economic perspectives, organizational integrity, and sustainability principles, and examines financial principles to inform study about key accounting practices for operational purposes. 3 credit(s)
  
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    MAM 8013 - Marketing in a Global Internet Age


    This course critically examines marketing as an integrative process. To do so, it takes into account the global marketplace, consumer behavior patterns, and how the Internet and social media have revolutionized the way customers communicate and engage with businesses. Within that context, the course explores the issues in key analytical areas of global markets, consumer behavior, and planning and product strategies. These foundations enable managers to develop a balance in marketing decisions that consider prices, channels of distribution, physical movement of goods, communications, advertising, personal sales, and other factors. Customer relationship management systems are also discussed. 3 credit(s)
  
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    MAM 8014 - Sustainable Operations and Organizational Systems


    The course covers the fundamentals of effective supply chain management from an organizational systems standpoint.  A key focus is on the design of global supply chain networks and how they are strategically managed. The course introduces a framework that identifies the key drivers of supply chain performance: facilities, inventory, transportation, information, sourcing, and pricing. Students acquire practical managerial concepts and skills that enable them to examine and improve supply chain performance. 3 credit(s)
  
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    MAM 8015 - Project Management and Execution: A Social Systems Approach


    With organizational systems and collaborative management principles and practices as the foundation, this course examines the fundamental nature of both project management and enterprise relationship management. With the global workplace as the context, it introduces the core concepts of project management, and critically examines related issues and practices. Among other topics, it explores how effective project management entails consistently communicating with internal and external stakeholders associated with various aspects of project, recruiting team members, managing the relationships with project managers and team members, and procuring the needed financial resources and materials. 3 credit(s)
  
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    MAM 8016 - Managing Cost, Resources, and Vendors


    Project management involves overseeing a portfolio of interrelated tasks that must be aligned with the enterprise’s strategic goals and operational processes to ensure successful and timely completion of the project.  Essential preliminary tasks are identified, including the creation of budgets, realistic timelines, reporting procedures, and vendor arrangements.  Utilizing a systems approach, this course examines effective approaches for (a) clearly scoping the project, (b) charting its components and processes, (c) identifying  factors that can impact its progress, (d) obtaining the resources needed for success, (e)managing the  project budget, and (f) managing vendors. 3 credit(s)
  
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    MAM 8017 - Project Schedule, Quality Control, and Risk Management


    Risk management, benchmarking and outcomes assessment are critical to successful project planning and progress measurement.  This course focuses on understanding core quality management principles and approaches and how to manage risk. Central to the course is an understanding of the nature of risk and its impacts. The course applies a systems and collaborative management perspective to critically examine how to design and use the appropriate assessment strategies, tools, and processes throughout a project. It addresses how to integrate them as key components of the project structure, execute them, and use assessment findings to make effective corrections. 3 credit(s)
  
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    MAM 8020 - Collaborative Work Systems & Teams


    This course examines the vital role that teams play in contemporary organizations. The theories of team development, team leadership and collaboration will be analyzed with an emphasis on testing practical utility. The role of culture, diversity and identity are surfaced so that students develop and understanding of principles of inclusion. Students are tasked with identifying various types of teams, including virtual, and the characteristics of each. They will identify leadership and followership skills required to work successfully in collaborative systems. 3 credit(s)
  
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    MAM 8025 - Systems Thinking, Analytics and Ethical Decision Making


    Business enterprises daily face new and complex situations that call for “out-of-the-box” thinking and entrepreneurial problem solving. Individuals and teams need organizational intelligence, the knowledge and practical wisdom contained in the workforce and the networks in which they participate, to make well informed and innovative decisions. With systems thinking, transdisciplinary analysis and integrative principles as a foundation, this course examines the art of solving problems collaboratively, making organizational decisions and taking sustainable, ethical action, as well as promoting innovation and taking the risk to try new ideas and approaches in a distributed intercultural work environment. The course also explores effective use of technology to accomplish this. 3 credit(s)
  
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    MAM 8026 - Conflicting and Corroborating Models of Adaptive Leadership


    Leaders of change in organizations and in community need a wide range of tools to address diverse environments and challenges. This specialization course for the Executive and Community Leadership program brings focus to how the tools of Distributed Adaptive Leadership mesh with other management and leadership models. Participants in this course will learn to assess dynamic systems to determine the appropriate leadership models to apply, and analyze the effects and efficacy of those models. 3 credit(s)
  
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    MAM 8027 - Thrival for Distributed Adaptive Leadership


    In the context of the Executive and Civic Leadership Specialization, “thrival” is held in contrast to “survival.” The VUCA (volatile,uncertain, complex, and ambiguous) nature of the environments in which leaders, teams, enterprises, and communities of interest frequently operate tends to increase stress and degrade performance. Participants in this specialization course learn individual and collective practices for nurturing self-awareness and vital emotional/relational engagement through taking responsibility for personal safety, inclusion of multiple perspectives, management of triggers and hungers; and clarity of values and purpose. 3 credit(s)
  
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    MAM 8028 - ECL Practicum


    Students demonstrate application of Distributed Adaptive Leadership (DAL) skills within an enterprise or community setting. The practicum integrates academic learning with practical experience, calling on all aspects of DAL curriculum to design, deploy, and evaluate a specific solution while leading a team. Each practicum is conducted by the student in their own chosen space (distributed enterprise or community of interest), with peer consultation and supervision by the instructor. The end product of the practicum is deployment of a strategic set of adaptive interventions (meetings, committees. events, policy changes and/or adaptive solutions) in a distributed system of the student’s choosing. 3 credit(s)
  
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    MAM 8030 - Program Capstone: Strategically Leading People, Projects, and Innovation


    With project management in distributed organizations and work-life integration as its focus, this course concludes the MAM program, tying together all of the business, management and organizational concepts, skill sets and workplace applications studied and developed throughout the various courses. The Capstone project enables students to articulate your own forward thinking vision and practice of empowering and ethical global management, demonstrate your empowering management and problem solving skills through analyzing and resolving a case study, and chart your career path through a professional portfolio. 3 credit(s)

Mind-Body Medicine

  
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    MBM 0505 - Mind-Body-Spirit Integration Seminar


    This four-day experiential seminar is a component of the residential conference for new students in the MS and PhD degrees in Mind-Body Medicine and the MA in Integrative Wellness Coaching.  It is available for students from other degree programs with advance registration. The “Mind-Body-Spirit Integration Seminar” includes lectures on integrative medicine, introduction of mind-body and spiritual skills and practices, experiential exercises, and facilitated small group sessions. Attendees will practice self-awareness and self-regulation skills, and engage in group discussion about their experiences. Both emotional responses and self-disclosure are normal elements in the seminar experience. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 0 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA-Term A/SP-Term A Course Length: 4 days (Term A) RC Required.
  
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    MBM 0901 - MBM 1-Day Residential Conference


    This course code registers the student to attend one day at the College of Integrative Medicine and Health Sciences residential conference for one day without committing to a workshop or siminar in advance. The course topics will vary widely according to which class the student attends. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 0 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA-Term A/SP-Term A Course Length: 1 day (Term A) RC Required.
 

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