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2017-2018 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook with Summer Addendum
Saybrook University
   
 
  May 30, 2020
 
2017-2018 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook with Summer Addendum 
    
2017-2018 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook with Summer Addendum [Archived Catalog]

Course Descriptions


Courses are identified and organized by degree program. Listed below are those courses that may be offered through the Department of Humanistic & Clinical Psychology for the Psychology degree program as well as the Human Science degree program for the 2015-2016 academic school year. CampusVue will list courses open for enrollment each semester, by Section if applicable.

Courses are identified and organized by degree programs: Clinical Psychology, PhD. Courses listed are offered as online cohort (CO), residential (R), or individually-mentored online (IO). Not all courses are offered every semester. See Program Descriptions and Requirements section of the College of Social Sciences section of this catalog and the Saybrook University website for updates and/or changes to courses.

 

Psychology

  
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    PSY 4000 - Comprehensive Exam


    Broadly, this exam affords the student the opportunity to demonstrate skills and knowledge related to clinical conceptualization, theory, research, and ethics, as well as competency in practice and cultural sensitivity. It also affords students self-assessment opportunities in reflecting upon their training and development as a clinical psychologist. The instructor serves as coach during the semester, prompting activities for students to draw upon previous course learning experiences and clinical training in exam preparation.  The exam is administered at the end of the term and is reviewed by a panel of faculty, allowing the department to review the student’s progression as a clinical psychologist. Satisfaction of the Comprehensive Exam is required in order for the student to proceed with the advanced program requirements of the dissertation, internship, and other degree requirements. Pre-requisite: Satisfactory completion of all core degree requirement courses.  1 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 4050 - Integrative Health Psychology: The Application of Psychological Concepts and Tools to Health


    The subject matter of health psychology as a discipline overlaps greatly with the fields of integrative health and mind-body medicine. In the broadest sense, health psychology is the organized and systematic effort to apply the knowledge and skills of the behavioral sciences to human health and illness. This course introduces health psychology as an application of psychological principles and skills to health care. It presents the framework, methodology, and applications of mainstream health psychology, and reviews common applications of health psychology, such as increasing patient compliance with well-lifestyle changes, and mind-body interventions to reduce irritable bowel or asthma symptoms. The course introduces basic skill sets in health psychology, such as brief dynamic psychotherapy, humanistic psychotherapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, health coaching, relaxation and meditation techniques, imagery therapy, biofeedback and applied psychophysiology, and hypnosis. Finally, it introduces divergent approaches to health psychology including optimal health and wellness programs, humanistic and existential psychology, energy psychology, and transpersonal/spiritual approaches. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 4530 - Psychology, Religion, and Spirituality in Their Cultural Contexts


    This course provides an overview of the ways that religion and spirituality interact with psychology with special attention to the cultural context. This includes an exploration of various models for how religion and spirituality can relate to science and, in particular, psychology. Various models for psychology of religion and spirituality are considered, as well as models for integrating religion and spirituality with psychology. Psychology historically has had a complex relationship with religion, spirituality, and culture. The primary purpose of this course is to explore various models for the interrelationships of psychology, religion, and spirituality with special consideration given to the cultural influences upon these relationships. Consideration will be given to these domains (psychology, religion, spirituality, and culture) separately as well as from an integrated perspective. The course begins with an overview of definitions and exploration of epistemological issues relevant to how science and psychology can relate to religion and spirituality. The next section of the course explores various models for the psychology of religion, followed by a section on models for integrating psychology with religion and/or spirituality. The concluding sections of the course devote attention to the cultural contexts for the relationships between psychology, religion, and spirituality as well as consideration to applications of the psychology of religion and the integration of psychology with religion and spirituality. Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites.  Cross-listed as CSIH 4530. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 4535 - The Use of Poetry with Death, Loss, and Life Transition


    The creative arts are often used to assist people facing death, loss, and other important life transitions. Similarly, these life events often cause individuals to reflect upon the meaning in their life and seek to create new meaning, which can be aided by poetry and the creative arts. This course focuses on the use of poetry when encountering death, loss, and life transitions. Students are encouraged to reflect upon their own use of creativity in times of difficult life transitions. Additionally, students will explore ways to facilitate the use of poetry with others facing life transitions. Poems from various cultural backgrounds are considered.  Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. Cross-listed as CS 4535 and EHTP 4535. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 6010 - The Psychology of Multiculturalism in North America


    Focusing on the psychological aspects of living in a multicultural society, this course acquaints students with the variety of cultural traditions within the United States. Topics covered in Psychology of Multiculturalism include the examination of the psychological implications of being a member of a minority group, understanding the impact of ethno-cultural values upon thought and behavior, questions about the universality of the human experience and the origins of personality, and theoretical statements about multiculturalism and the balancing of conflicting and sometimes competing interests in society. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 6020 - Developmental Psychology


    The processes and significant transition points for child, adolescent, and adult development are considered in this class. Classic and contemporary theories of development through lifespan, including some modern western perspectives, are contrasted by examining their principal concepts and uncovering their assumptions about what motivates and influences development. Topics such as mother-infant attachment, sex-role socialization, cognitive and moral development, reciprocal effects in parent-child interaction, higher stages of adult development, and the revolutionary impact of feminist theory and research on classic models of development are emphasized. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 6030 - Personality Theory and Research


    This course provides an overview of classical and contemporary theory and research in personality. Topics include an examination of various theories including contrasts among psychoanalytic, social learning and humanistic perspectives; current theoretical controversies; the function and evolution of theory; and major methodological issues. Special attention is given to new theories and research on aspects such as intrinsic motivation, emotions, and locus of control, pro-social behavior, self-concept, and personality change. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 6050 - Mindfulness and Spirituality in Clinical Practice


    Mindfulness-based therapies are now accepted as empirically supported’ treatments and are often treatments of choice in mainstream clinical and medical settings. In addition, the prior mainstream taboo regarding including spiritual and/or religious dimensions of life in psychotherapy has been supplanted by the publication of a plethora of texts published by APA and others regarding the integration of these dimensions in clinical practice. This clinical course explores these recent trends that mirror aspects of the long-standing traditions of humanistic, transpersonal, and existential psychology in the integration of mindfulness-based meditation practices, spirituality, and religion and prayer in clinical practice. Through reflective inquiry, students will gain understanding regarding their own experience and views regarding these factors in therapy and how they might locate themselves in relationship to them professionally. Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites.   3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 6060 - Ethics and Laws in Psychotherapy and Behavioral Science Research


    This course is designed to introduce students to professional ethics, standards of conduct, federal and state laws, and board of psychology rules that inform, influence, and/or regulate teaching, clinical practice, and research in professional psychology. The primary foci of the course will be on knowledge of the content and application of professional ethics, federal & state laws, and board of psychology rules. Within the context of self- reflection and examination of personal values and beliefs, students will be introduced to the professional associations and state agencies responsible for leadership, public policy, promulgation of laws, professional practice standards and rules, jurisdictional boundaries, cooperative institutional relationships, and regulatory/administrative procedures. In addition, students will be required to become familiar with federal and state legislative statutes and rules that regulate the professional practice of psychology and conducting behavioral science and biomedical research in their jurisdictions. These include but are not limited to the education and training requirements and filing complaints for misconduct. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 6070 - Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Applied within Humanistic and Integrative Approaches


    This cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) course will offer a review of key foundational theories and concepts, as well as methods of assessing, conceptualizing, and treating patients using CBT approaches. Students will also learn about the efficacy and limitation evidence for utilizing CBT in treating symptoms of several disorders. In addition to learning the key concepts of CBT and practicing core skills, students will examine how CBT can be integrated with humanistic and other integrative therapy approaches. This course will additionally integrate concepts of social justice, strengths-based approaches, wellness, and multiculturalism/diversity as it applies to the adaptation of CBT tools within a humanistic perspective.  Though open to all students, this course satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites.  3 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall Semester
  
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    PSY 6080 - Introduction to Forensic Psychology


    This course is intended to acquaint the student with the emerging field of forensic psychology. Introduced will be a range of applications that psychology offers to the legal arena. Major areas covered include civil commitments, custody evaluations, criminal application, competency to stand trial, violence risk assessments, psychologist as an expert witness, and current best practices with psychological assessment in varied legal contexts. Discussed will be the stance of the humanistic psychologist amongst the adversarial environment of the courtroom and the legal system at large. Prerequisites: Cognitive Assessment; Personality Assessment. Though open to all students, this course satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites.  3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: Spring Course Length: 16 weeks
  
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    PSY 6150 - Existential Psychotherapies II: Rollo May and the Existential Tradition


    Rollo May was the founding parent of existential-humanistic psychology and a pivotal figure in what we may call philosophical/psychological rapprochement. His books, byproducts of a profound disposition and wide-ranging literacy and curiosity, encourage a rich dialogue between philosophy and psychology and the broader humanities. May expresses concretely what he believed from the time of his earliest work: that psychology requires a grounded, theoretically cogent, interdisciplinary approach to human nature. His books remain an auspicious place to start for those interested in learning about what psychology at its most esoteric can be. In this course, we will consider Rollo May’s work and legacy attentively, thereby glimpsing what psychology at its most visionary and rarified might be.  Though open to all students, this course satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. Cross-listed as EHTP 6150. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 6160 - Applied Positive Psychology


    Positive psychology (PP) is the scientific study of optimal human functioning to help people flourish. This Applied PP course is a foundation course to help students not only understand the research on the core themes of positive psychology, but also equip students with the helpful positive interventions in various area areas of professional psychology, such as clinical, health, education, organization and community. Both PP and applied PP courses are in great demand all over the world, because of their broad appeal to students and helping professionals (i.e., counsellors, psychologists, coaches, doctors, social workers, educations, and human resources managers.). PP is the 21st century in much the say way humanistic-existential psychology (HE) was in the 70s. Both appeal to individuals who aspire to promote the well-being in themselves, their clients, and society; both seek to develop a strength-based practice in helping professionals. What makes this course unique is that it has moved from the initial positive psychology narrow focus on positive emotions, positive traits and positive institutions (Seligman & Csikszentmihalyi, 2000) to positive psychology 2.0 (Kashdan & Biswas-Diener, 2014; Wong, 2011) which focuses the totality of the person and the positive potentials in both positive and negative conditions. Another distinctive of this course is that it integrates the best from PP and HP to help people become authentic and fully functioning individuals (Wong, 2010b, in press-b). Advocating a holistic approach towards research, it recommends the triangulation of scientific research findings, time-tested wisdom, and personal experiences as the basis for truths. In sum, this course has the flexibility to meet the career needs and aspirations of individual students through the choice of special projects.  Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 7500 - Clinical Psychology Graduate Colloquium


    The clinical psychology graduate colloquium is designed to support students throughout their degree program with specific attention to fostering community of learners, preparation and support for practica and internships, preparation and support for graduate-level research, and professional development. Enrollment is a degree required throughout matriculation and affords further support from Faculty Lead, Peer Lead, Academic Advisor and Director of Clinical Training (DCT). 0 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 7510 - Social Psychology


    Social Psychology is fundamental to the study of psychology and the human sciences. In this course, major theories, methods and research findings that comprise the discipline of social psychology are examined from a critical standpoint. The primary objective of this course is to increase students’ awareness of the social, historical, and political dimension to psychological understanding. The application of theoretical and empirical work to real world social problems is emphasized. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 8125 - Internship


    This course is intended for students placed in clinical pre-doctoral internship meeting their licensure requirements and focuses on professional development and advanced clinical skills. Students develop case formulations to recognize issues in assessment, evaluation, and diagnosis, and review treatment models, interventions, and therapeutic outcomes. Authorization from Director of Clinical Training is required to enroll in this course. 0 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 8145A - Clinical Practicum I


    Students completing clinical practicum placement are enrolled in this course. The course is designed to provide students with a model for thinking about themselves as practitioners, their expectations and concerns, while also providing an arena in which to compare and contrast field placement experiences with other students. Practicum I focuses on professional development important for beginning therapists. Students share from their practicum experience, drawing on their practicum journaling, individual and group exercises, and on-line discussions. Students develop case formulations to recognize issues in assessment, evaluation, and diagnosis, and review treatment models, interventions, and therapeutic outcomes. Prerequisite(s): Authorization from Director of Clinical Training is required to enroll in this course. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 8145B - Clinical Practicum II


    Students completing clinical practicum placement are enrolled in this course. This course is designed to provide students with a model for approaching crisis and critical issues in clinical work, while also providing an arena in which to compare and contrast field placement experiences with other students. Practicum II focuses on professional development and intermediate clinical skills. Students share from their practicum experience, drawing on their practicum journaling, individual and group exercises, and on-line discussions. Students develop case formulations to recognize issues in assessment, evaluation, and diagnosis, and review treatment models, interventions, and therapeutic outcomes. Prerequisite(s): Authorization from Director of Clinical Training is required to enroll in this course. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 8145C - Clinical Practicum III


    Students completing clinical practicum placement are enrolled in this third course if warranted. The course is designed to provide students with a model for thinking about themselves as practitioners, their expectations and concerns, while also providing an arena in which to compare and contrast field placement experiences with other students. Practicum I focuses on professional development important for beginning therapists. Students share from their practicum experience, drawing on their practicum journaling, individual and group exercises, and on-line discussions. Students develop case formulations to recognize issues in assessment, evaluation, and diagnosis, and review treatment models, interventions, and therapeutic outcomes. Authorization from Director of Clinical Training is required to enroll in this course. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 8230 - Cognitive Assessment


    Theories of psychological measurement form the foundation of this course. Students then learn how to use the major tools of cognitive and neuropsychological assessment to view the mind at work. Students also learn how to apply statistical and measurement concepts, principles of assessment, theories of intelligence, ethic al issues, and special populations’ issues relevant to psychological assessment. Students practice administration, scoring, and writing psychological assessment reports that are a problem-focused, comprehensive integration of the historical, biological, psychological, and social aspects of the person. A collaborative, strengths-based approach is used. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 8231 - Cognitive Assessment Lab


    This lab is required enrollment in the term in which the student is enrolled in PSY8230 Cognitive Assessment & Lab. Full attendance during the residential conference offering is required.  The residential lab is designed to introduce students to the practice of cognitive assessment, including a conceptual model of cognitive functioning, domains of cognitive ability, and issues of assessments. Additionally, students will be exposed to prominent instruments such as the WAIS-IV, WRAT4, and others. 0 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 8250 - Personality Assessment


    This course focuses on the individual as seen through the lens of personality theories and the assessment instruments that are derived from those theories. Students learn the uses of standardized and non-standardized instruments for assessing the person-in-process including personality, strengths, values, vocational interests, spirituality, social environment, psychopathology, cognitions, and behavior. Students practice administration, scoring, and writing comprehensive, strengths-focused assessments that provide evidence-based conclusions and deal with the legal, ethical, and cultural issues in the selection, administration, and interpretation of personality tests and other instruments. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 8251 - Personality Assessment Lab


    This lab is required enrollment in the term in which the student is enrolled in PSY8250 Personality Assessment & Lab. Full attendance during the residential conference offering is required.  The residential lab experience is designed to support students in understanding the theoretical and empirical basis for a number of instruments such as the MMPI-II, MCMI-III, Rorschach and others employed in the evaluation of personality and psychological functioning. 0 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 8950 - Certificate Integrative Seminar


    This is the cornerstone assignment for the Complex Trauma & the Healing Process Certificate program. The student is given the opportunity to tie together and integrate the most important aspects of the foundation courses by evaluating an identified issue(s) of interest, the individual, cultural, spiritual, and mind-body considerations, barriers, and key factors in assessment and healing as well as the ongoing, presenting / emerging needs in providing further assessment, intervention, and practice. This entails the student synthesizing his or her learning in conjunction with exploring research related to an area of interest among the many crucial issues now arising and impacting our national and international communities. Students will explore what can be done to mitigate this impact, areas to prevent, and promote healing through the integration of traditional and non-traditional practices. In addition, students will develop and submit a specific plan for continuing personal and professional development in relationship to their work surrounding traumatic stress. 1 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 9200 - Master’s Project (M.A. in Clinical Psychology)


    This course is required for clinical psychology students who entered with a B.A. or B.S. degree and is designed as a master’s degree culminating project that will not involve the use of human participants in any way (e.g., an expanded literature review; developing an intervention or program, but without implementation or piloting in any way; writing a training manual based on theory only, etc.). For PSY 9200, no committee is formed; that is, the course has one instructor only. As there is no data collection from human participants, students are required to complete the shore form: Institutional Review Board Application for Theoretical Studies. In addition, there are no project orals for this course. If opting for PSY 9200, the course supervisor must be a member of the Clinical Psychology degree program faculty or someone approved by the degree program director and/or Specialization Coordinator (if warranted). 3 credit(s)

Research

  
  
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    RES 512A - Psychophysiological Research Techniques


    This course covers the basic steps and time-line of a project, steps in formulating and maturing a question, research ethics, the protocol approval process, background and literature searches, and methods of determining a project’s feasibility and relevance. The logic and progression of study designs used to evaluate the efficacy of behavioral medicine studies is detailed and exemplified. Topics include single subject and single group designs - cohorts, multiple group designs, strengths and weaknesses of longitudinal and cross-sectional studies, prospective experimental vs. observational and retrospective designs. Students will learn how objective tests, surveys, and inventories are normalized in comparison with various groups, analyzed, and critiqued. The course also covers research protocol design, the consent form, and the protocol review process. This section covers subject selection techniques (sampling, inclusion - exclusion, etc.), kinds of data (dichotomous, nominal, ordinal, continuous, etc.), techniques for hardening subjective data, validity and reliability, survey and questionnaire design, as well as pilot studies and the initial power analysis - feasibility and resources. 3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 512B - Research Experience


    This course is designed to teach students how to analyze data from typical study designs used in psychophysiology. It includes qualitative and quantitative data reduction and analysis, descriptive statistics, inferential statistics - parametric and non-parametric, power analysis, pattern analysis, and analysis of outcome and quality of life studies. Students use standard data analysis software to analyze practice data sets so they become familiar with the use of these programs. 3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 512C - Statistical Evualuation in Psychophysiology


    Students are rarely proficient in the skills actually required to perform a research project at the level and complexity of a dissertation. This course gives students a chance to apply skills taught in the lecture portion of the research course including IRB approval, subject recruitment, data gathering, data analysis, and writing the paper based on the practice study.  3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 573 - Dissertation Preparation


    A research committee must be selected and the final version of the dissertation prepared while taking this course. The student and his / her dissertation advisor, who serves as chair of the student’s dissertation committee, work closely together planning the dissertation and gathering the other members of the committee. The advisor guides the student through all of the parts of the dissertation process from planning, writing the protocol, performing the study, analyzing the data, and writing the results. This is normally a very close relationship with frequent interactions via e-mail and phone. 3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 580AA - Dissertation


    The dissertation project is designed to make an original contribution to the clinical literature in psychophysiology and to be directly and practically related to the student’s intended clinical practice. Students perform work on their dissertations in sequence with the dissertation planning seminars. A research committee must be selected and the final version of the dissertation prepared while taking CP573 - dissertation preparation. The dissertation is performed under the guidance of the committee’s chair who is normally also the student’s program advisor. The completed (25,000 word minimum) dissertation should be handed in when sufficient credits have been accrued to graduate. 7 credits 1 credit(s)
  
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    RES 580B - Dissertation


    The dissertation project is designed to make an original contribution to the clinical literature in psychophysiology and to be directly and practically related to the student’s intended clinical practice. Students perform work on their dissertations in sequence with the dissertation planning seminars. A research committee must be selected and the final version of the dissertation prepared while taking CP573 - dissertation preparation. The dissertation is performed under the guidance of the committee’s chair who is normally also the student’s program advisor. The completed (25,000 word minimum) dissertation should be handed in when sufficient credits have been accrued to graduate. 7 credits 3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 580C - Dissertation


    The dissertation project is designed to make an original contribution to the clinical literature in psychophysiology and to be directly and practically related to the student’s intended clinical practice. Students perform work on their dissertations in sequence with the dissertation planning seminars. A research committee must be selected and the final version of the dissertation prepared while taking CP573 - dissertation preparation. The dissertation is performed under the guidance of the committee’s chair who is normally also the student’s program advisor. The completed (25,000 word minimum) dissertation should be handed in when sufficient credits have been accrued to graduate. 7 credits 3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 1004 - Information Competency and Library Use (PhD Managing Organizational Systems and MA, PhD Transformative Social Change)


    This course is designed for students to leverage their prior learning experience and acquire new resources for graduate study and lifelong learning. The course introduces students to the ethical, legal, and socio- economic issues of information and the changing environment of scholarly publishing. This course is also a preparation for information research (literature review) as it pertains to the thesis or dissertation by working through the process of defining and articulating information needs related to a specific topic, identifying, and selecting the appropriate resources, developing and executing research strategies, critically interpreting and analyzing results, and presenting them in a professional style (APA, 6th ed.). 2 credit(s)
  
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    RES 1005 - Methods of Research and Disciplined Inquiry I (PhD Psychology, Managing Organizational Systems, Transformative Social Change)


    This first course of a two-term sequence focuses on the acquisition of research competence to search and circumscribe the subject domain for human inquiry; define the research focus; formulate researchable questions; know the relevant methodological traditions to select one suitable to the question; design and plan the research study; know the procedures proposed for data collection, analysis, and synthesis; know the ethical issues of proposed research; critique research; critically review literature and propose research. The course requires completion of a research proposal that communicates the research focus, a preliminary review of literature, and the research question. (Ph.D. program only) Prerequisite(s): Doctoral program status. 3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 1006 - Information Competency and Library Use (PhD Psychology)


    This course is designed for students to leverage prior learning experience and acquire new resources for graduate study and lifelong learning. This course introduces students to the ethical, legal, and socio-economic issues of information and the changing environment of scholarly publishing. This course is also a preparation for information research (literature review) as it pertains to the thesis or dissertation by working through the process of defining and articulating information needs related to a specific topic, identifying, and selecting the appropriate resources, developing and executing research strategies, critically interpreting and analyzing results, and presenting them in a professional style (APA, 6th ed.). (Ph.D. program only) 2 credit(s)
  
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    RES 1015 - Methods of Research and Disciplined Inquiry II (PhD Psychology, Managing Organizational Systems, Transformative Social Change)


    This second course of a two-semester sequence continues its focus on the acquisition of research competence to search and circumscribe the subject domain for human inquiry; define the research focus; formulate researchable questions; know the relevant methodological traditions to select one suitable to the question; design and plan the research study; know the procedures proposed for data collection, analysis, and synthesis; know the ethical issues of proposed research; critique research; and critically review and propose research. Entails completion of a research proposal that communicates a research focus, review of literature, research question, choice of method, and proposed research procedures; and IRB Certificate. Prerequisites: Completion of RES 1005. (Ph.D. program only) Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of RES 1005 . 3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 1023 - Understanding Research and Evaluation (for MA Counseling Only)


    This course emphasizes competencies in research and evaluation foundational to clinical counseling and psychotherapy. The course introduces inquiry in quantitative and qualitative methods with emphasis on conceptualization, design, basic statistical principles and analysis, and critique of research. The course presents an overview of approaches to research and evaluation, including humanistic, existential, systemic, and alternative paradigms; evidence-based treatment and empirically supported practice; needs and outcomes assessment and program evaluation; and ethical and multicultural issues in research. 3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 1025 - Understanding Research (MA Psychology, Transformative Social Change)


    This course will emphasize the basic competencies to conduct research and to read and understand research done by others. Students will be introduced to the range of methods for human inquiry as well as the chief concepts for conceptualizing, designing, and critiquing both quantitative and qualitative research found in the published research literature relevant to graduate level work. The course presents a broad overview of mainstream approaches to research as well as humanistic, existential, systemic and alternative paradigms, as well as addressing ethical and multicultural issues in research. The course is designed to enable students to relate and apply research to their subject domains of study and areas of research interest. This course is required of Master’s students in their first year of graduate study. (M.A. program only) 3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 1026 - Information Competency and Library Use (MA Psychology)


    This course is designed for students to leverage prior learning experience and acquire new resources for graduate study and lifelong learning. This course introduces students to the ethical, legal, and socio-economic issues of information and the changing environment of scholarly publishing. This course is also a preparation for information research (literature review) as it pertains to the thesis or dissertation by working through the process of defining and articulating information needs related to a specific topic, identifying, and selecting the appropriate resources, developing and executing research strategies, critically interpreting and analyzing results, and presenting them in a professional style (APA, 6th ed.). (M.A program only.) 2 credit(s)
  
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    RES 1026L - Information Competency and Library Use


    This is a “hybrid” or “blended” course, delivered mostly online in the Canvas course management system and partly face-to-face with the instructor during the Residential Conferences. Students will use online and printed resources to explore and discover different types of materials and sources of information for future research projects and for life-long learning. Students will learn and practice finding, citing, evaluating, and annotating online and printed information sources, will assemble an annotated bibliography in APA style, and will be introduced to a number of online resources and tools. The instructor will evaluate students through their completion of brief assigned research tasks and their production of the annotated bibliography. 1 credit(s)
  
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    RES 1030 - Experimental Research Methods


    Research that involves the manipulation and control of variables for the purpose of testing hypotheses from a human oriented research perspective. Emphasis on research skill-building in posing hypotheses, operationalizing variables, designing experiments, hypothesis testing, qualitative and quantitative data analyses with experimental design, critique and interpretation of the results from experiments. Entails a research proposal, IRB review, execution of a pilot research study, and written research report. Conducting a pilot experiment is a required part of the course. (Ph.D. program only) Prerequisite(s): Completion of RES 1015 . 3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 1040 - Qualitative Research Methods


    This course examines research methods of inquiry that are primarily descriptive and interpretive in nature. Each student will (a) review and understand four or more methodologies for qualitative research, (b) develop a research question, (c) create a research design addressing this question, (d) specify participants and recruitment strategies, (e) identify specific analysis methods, and (f) conduct a pilot study using all their acquired knowledge from this course for practical experience.  (Ph.D. program only) Prerequisite(s): Completion of RES 1015 . 3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 1045 - Fundamental Statistics for Practitioner Scholars


    This course is designed to impart a depth of understanding, as well as a practical grasp, of the range of statistical methods used in basic science and applied research. Areas covered include organizing datasets; producing descriptive statistics; testing hypotheses with inferential statistics; and interpreting the results, including output from statistics software, to determine how they relate to research questions being asked. Among the procedures covered are t tests, ANOVA, chi-square tests, nonparametric statistics, and regression. No prerequisites; extensive mathematical training is not required. Open to doctoral students, but does not meet a doctoral level research requirement. 3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 1050 - Applied Program Evaluation


    Program evaluation encompasses several different philosophical, methodological and process perspectives. This course will introduce you to the varied spectrum of the field of evaluation and provide you with the opportunity to reflect on what evaluation approaches work best for what situation. As opposed to basic research, which is intended to expand general knowledge in a particular area, program evaluation seeks to improve our understanding of a specific program. The information gained from program evaluation may contribute to general knowledge in a particular area, but most often will generate knowledge specific to a particular setting, problem, and program. Course requires a research proposal, IRB review, execution of a pilot research study, and written research report. (Ph.D. program only) Prerequisite(s): Completion of RES 1015 . 3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 1100A - Research Practicum


    The Research Practicum is considered part of the doctoral Candidacy phase along with completion of the three essays. Doctoral students may enroll in RES 1100A when they have successfully completed the advanced-level research course. Students may simultaneously enroll in one or more essays at that time if they have completed all other requisite degree program requirements. Students enrolled in RES 1100A gain further experience with the research process by conducting a pilot study. Upon completing the second-level research course, the Research Practicum commences with a written research proposal between student and instructor that defines course content in terms of the research competencies and learning activities needed. This proposal is based upon the student’s proficiency with the core areas of research competency. The course is designed to accommodate more advanced study of the range of approaches and methods included in the second-level research course. The student proposes, conducts, and reports the findings of this pilot research study utilizing specific data gathering and/or data processing research procedures of a particular methodology and research tradition. The course also is designed to familiarize students with opportunities and pitfalls in a prescribed area of doing research that enables them to continue developing research skills toward proficiency demonstrative of readiness for dissertation research. This course content must be explicit in its research focus; that is, a simple review of the literature is not acceptable. However, focus on a variety of specific areas of focus and research skill building are possible. RES 1100A entails writing a research proposal, completion of the IRB review process, execution of the pilot study, and expressing those findings within a final research report. This report is considered as an element of the Candidacy orals, and will be reviewed by all essay committee members at that time. (Ph.D. program only) Prerequisite(s): Completion of one advanced-level research course. Students embarking on a research project not involving the collection of data from human participants are expected to complete this Research Practicum within one semester; however, an IP or I may be given at the end of that term. Students who intend to complete a research pilot study involving the collection of primary data may consider RES 1100A as Part 1 of a two-part research practicum. If so, credit is granted for RES 1100A upon completion of the research proposal and clearance by the Saybrook IRB. 3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 1100B - Research Practicum - Part II


    If students propose to complete a research study during the practicum that entails the collection and analysis of primary data from human participants, and cannot finish the project within RES 1100A , they will register for RES 1100B for a second semester of practicum. During RES 1100B, the student is required to complete the participant solicitation process, collect and analyze all primary data, and complete the written research practicum report. (Ph.D. program only) Prerequisite(s): Completion of RES 1100A . 3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 1105 - Methods of Research (Clinical Psychology, Clinical Psychology Specialization Only)


    This course introduces clinical students to the theory and practice of scientific psychological research; it is a companion course to Statistics 1110. Both quantitative research (positivist, statistical and measurement-based) and qualitative (descriptive, interpretive, interview and observation-based) paradigms are legitimate approaches to studying psychological phenomena. However, since the quantitative paradigm is dominant in contemporary society, science is usually envisioned exclusively in terms of measurement and causality. This course is intended to introduce students to both paradigms and their shared history and differing assumptions and methods. Qualitative research is an alternate vision of psychological science, which, while not antagonistic to empiricism, invites students to carefully examine their own unexamined assumptions about what constitutes “science” and to awaken to a radically different way of understanding psychical phenomena. Students will be introduced to the history of psychology, to the debates concerning what “psychological science” means, and will begin to learn to articulate their own areas of interest for future research. They will learn to articulate a psychological research question, conduct a preliminary literature review to investigate and summarize the existing quantitative and qualitative research concerning that question, and will be introduced to ethical issues in conducting psychological research. In addition to an overview of quantitative design, students will be introduced to three examples of qualitative approaches to psychological research-grounded theory, phenomenology, and narrative inquiry-to give students a sense of how such research is conducted. 3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 1110 - Statistics


    Quantitative data analyses utilized for various research designs in basic science and applied research are addressed, including descriptive and inferential statistics, such as t-test, ANOVA, chi-square test, regressions, and nonparametric statistics. Areas covered include organizing datasets, producing descriptive statistics, testing hypothesis with inferential statistics, and interpreting the results. This course emphasizes understanding of the conceptual foundations, meanings, and interpretations of the statistics, rather than computation, but the overview and introduction to SPSS is included in the course. Prerequisite(s): RES 1105 - Methods of Research (Clinical Psychology, Clinical Psychology Specialization Only)  course. 3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 1140 - Case Study Methods in Psychology


    The careful observation, description, and discussion of individual cases are pervasive in psychology, human science, and organizational systems. This course provides an historical background and context for case study research methods. It presents case study research as a fundamental means to develop valid knowledge and delineates methodological issues in case study research. Can be adapted with the instructor to the psychological study of individuals and groups, interdisciplinary study in the human sciences, and the case study of organizations. Entails a research proposal, IRB review, execution of a pilot research study, and written research report. (Ph.D. program only) Prerequisite(s): Completion of RES 1015 . 3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 1150 - Action Research


    Action research is a perspective in which research and action are interconnected.  This level two advanced research course focuses on the history, theory, and practice of research where the researcher is involved as a facilitator, in a consultant and participant role, supporting the members of an organization or community to create change.  The theories and models of Friere, Argyris, Lewin, W,F. Whyte, and many others are incorporated into different approaches to action research and participative action research (PAR). (Ph.D. program only) Prerequisite(s): Completion of RES 1015 . 3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 1160 - Systems Research


    This is a Level 2 research course, introducing methodologies which are consistent with systemic approaches to understanding organizations.  It is designed with reference to the primary text, A Guide to Systems Research, which is itself designed around an eight-part model reflective of participatory action research.  The goal is to understand how systems change and evolve within the context of their environments.  As a Level 2 research course, a research proposal and IRB application are usually expected, in order to complete a small research study utilizing the chosen methodology.  It is also acceptable to propose a theoretical model of an existing or future system, using the concepts introduced in the course. 

    Students embarking on this course have identified a possible research question and application that can benefit from a systemic research approach.  Working closely with the instructor, they design a systems-based research methodology for your chosen application, define the situation and describe why a systems approach is appropriate, and clearly identify the structure of systems research methods that you will use.  Students must also consider: How will you model the system? How will you include other people and use qualitative and quantitative methods to develop the model? 

    Based on the chosen application, student and instructor will agree upon the appropriate reading material to support the proposal and final research report. (Ph.D. program only) Prerequisite(s): Completion of RES 1015 . 3 credit(s)

  
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    RES 1200A - Dissertation Proposal I (Clinical Psychology, Clinical Specialization Only)


    This course is the first in designing the dissertation proposal. Students formally form their dissertation committee and work closely with the chair, in consultation with the committee as needed, in authoring the first two chapters, Introduction (topic, research problem, research questions, purpose of the study) and Review of Literature. This course is a prerequisite for Proposal II. 3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 1200B - Dissertation Proposal II (Clinical Psychology, Clinical Specialization Only)


    Working with the dissertation committee, student’s work on chapter 3 (methodology) of the proposal manuscript. As part of this course, students undergo Saybrook IRB review of their proposed study. A proposal conference is held with the committee, resulting in the decision to accept or reject the proposal. This course is the second in designing the dissertation proposal. Prerequisite(s): RES 1200A   3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 3130 - Descriptive Phenomenological Psychological Research


    The descriptive phenomenological psychological method is a qualitative research method that is an expression of the human science movement in psychology. This research method is Giorgi’s adaptation of Husserl’s phenomenological philosophy for psychology. Using the method, researchers interview participants regarding a psychologically meaningful experience and then work in a caring and demanding way to make explicit the psychological meanings in the data using specific steps: employing the phenomenological reduction and epoché, exercising free imaginative variation, and searching for the least-variant psychological structures within a given context. This is a hands-on course the emphasizes and provides mentoring in the concrete steps necessary for phenomenological research, as well as introduce necessary theoretical concepts including intentionality, the phenomenological reduction and “intuition” as understood in phenomenology. This course is an introduction to the practice of research, and is required for students who are considering using phenomenology in their practicum or dissertation. (Ph.D. program only) Prerequisite(s): Completion of RES 1015 . 3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 4005 - Narrative and Auto/Biographical Research


    This course focuses on the foundations and applications of Narrative Inquiry and the closely related methodologies of auto-biography and narratology.  The course recognizes the importance of storytelling, conversation, forms of everyday oral and written communication, and narrative text in the study of human lives.  It first examines the larger topic of in-depth, qualitative methodologies in the human sciences.  It briefly considers kindred research methods that rely on textual data, from biography to phenomenology, ethno-methodology, and ethnography.  Course assignments prepare the student to execute a full pilot study, including becoming knowledgeable of preparing the research proposal, and reporting research findings.  Assignments include preparing components of a research proposal, specifically the methods section and results report.  Assignments also develop applied research skills, including data collection, thematic analysis, and interpretation.  In addition, techniques for intentionally introducing embodiment to the research process. The course entails a research proposal, execution of a pilot research study, and written research report. (Ph.D. program only) Prerequisite(s): Completion of RES 1015   3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 4900 - Hermeneutic Psychological Research


    In the social sciences it is widely acknowledged that human beings spontaneously express themselves through stories that embody self-identity and collective identity. This course introduces students to a hermeneutic approach to investigating the psychological meanings in the stories through which people articulate important lived-experiences. Students will study the philosophical background of hermeneutics, be introduced to a methodical approach to conducting hermeneutic psychological research, and conduct an interview-based course project.

    The hermeneutic tradition, like the phenomenological tradition as a whole, offers a well-articulated philosophical foundation that can be adapted for psychological research. A hermeneutic approach pays careful attention not only to the biographical context of research participants, but also the communal, cultural-linguistic, and historical contexts within which people narrate their lives.  Such research is not simply a “re-telling” of peoples’ stories. Rather, peoples’ narratives are psychologically complex and so must be carefully analyzed in order to yield scholarly knowledge. (Ph.D. program only) Prerequisite(s): Completion of RES 1015 . 3 credit(s)

  
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    RES 9010 - Qualifying Essay 1: Dissertation Critique (Managing Organizational Systems, Psychology, Transformative Social Change Only)


    The course engages the student in writing a critique of a completed dissertation with particular attention to its methodology. Successful completion of all three essays and the Candidacy oral exam is a requirement in order to qualify for admission to doctoral Candidacy. The focus of this essay is on the ability to understand and think critically about the research of others. By writing a critique of a dissertation students will demonstrate that: a) they have learned to read, understand, analyze, and constructively critique the research of a colleague; b) they understand the principles, methods, and utility of research; and c) they understand how researchers select a research question, select a research method, carry out a research study, analyze data collected, interpret observations, and draw conclusions. The dissertation to be critiqued must have been published within the past seven years, and no one on the Candidacy committee may have served on that dissertation committee. Students are encouraged to select a dissertation that uses the same method being considered for their own dissertation. This will be of help in that a critique of the methods chapter in an existing dissertation may contribute to a better understanding of how related principles and research tenets may be expressed. Students are required to consult with their Essay Supervisor to determine which two essays they will enroll in first. (Ph.D. program only) Prerequisite(s): All pre-Candidacy coursework completed, with the exception of RES 1100A /RES 1100B . 3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 9020 - Qualifying Essay 2: Literature Review (Managing Organizational Systems, Psychology, Transformative Social Change Only)


    The purpose of the course is to write an essay that entails an exploration of an area of research interest in order to demonstrate proficiency in literature review research competency to undertake a dissertation. In contrast to RES 9010 , which is focused on the critique of an existing dissertation, this essay involves a content domain focus within the degree field, including a critical review of relevant theoretical, empirical, and historical literature on the selected topic. Students are required to consult with their Essay Supervisor to determine which two essays they will enroll in first.

      (Ph.D. program only) Prerequisite(s): All pre-Candidacy coursework completed, with the exception of RES 1100A /RES 1100B . 3 credit(s)

  
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    RES 9030 - Qualifying Essay 3: Literature Review (Organizational Systems, Psychology, Transformative Social Change Only)


    The purpose of RES 9030 is the same as for RES 9020 . Like RES 9020 , it can explore any focus of interest within the degree field, including a critical review of relevant theoretical, empirical, and historical literature on the selected topic. This essay must be clearly different and distinct from the material covered in RES 9020 . Students are required to consult with their Essay Supervisor to determine which two essays they will enroll in first. (Ph.D. program only) Prerequisite(s): All pre-Candidacy coursework completed, with the exception of RES 1100A /RES 1100B . 3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 9200 - Master’s Project Research


    The project can be the culminating research requirement of a master’s program. Its purpose is to engage the student in integrating and organizing information gained through course work, and applying these skills to a project effort. It can explore any question of relevance to the student’s program by way of disciplined inquiry, which applies a clearly defined methodology. It often has an applied research emphasis with its aim and scope doable in one term. Entails written project prospectus, project research report, and closure session (project orals). (M.A. Psychology degree program students only) 3 credit(s)
  
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    RES 9400 - Master’s Thesis Research


    The thesis can be the culminating research requirement of a master’s program. The purpose of this inquiry is to engage the student in integrating and organizing information gained through course work, and applying these skills to a research effort. Thesis research can pursue any question of relevance to student’s program by way of disciplined inquiry with a clearly defined methodology. The range of approaches available is the same as for dissertations from qualitatively oriented and experimental studies to theoretical research. Entails written thesis proposal, thesis defense, and thesis research report. (M.A. program only) 6 credit(s)
  
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    RES 9500 - Dissertation Research (Clinical Psychology, Clinical Specialization, Managing Organizational Systems Only)


    The purpose of dissertation research is to demonstrate mastery of research competencies needed to do independent research and contribute to the discipline of the doctorate degree. The course is designed to engage the student in integrating and organizing information gained through earlier coursework, and applying these skills to a substantive research effort. The dissertation can explore any question of relevance to the student’s degree program by way of disciplined inquiry, which applies a clearly defined methodology. (Ph.D. program only) Prerequisite(s): Admission to doctoral candidacy. 12 credit(s)
  
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    RES 9500 - Dissertation Research (Psychology, Transformative Social Change Only)


    The purpose of dissertation research is to demonstrate mastery of research competencies needed to do independent research and contribute to the discipline of the doctorate degree. The course is designed to engage the student in integrating and organizing information gained through earlier coursework, and applying these skills to a substantive research effort. The dissertation can explore any question of relevance to the student’s degree program by way of disciplined inquiry, which applies a clearly defined methodology. (Ph.D. program only) Prerequisite(s): Admission to doctoral Candidacy. 6-18 credit(s)

Seattle Counseling

  
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    COUN 2010S - Structure and Dynamics of the Family


    This course provides theoretical and phenomenological overview of the changing nature of family structures and dynamics through lifespan and intergenerational perspectives. The course explores the dynamics of human systems, processes in adaptation, and integrative approaches in systems interventions. The course emphasizes case description, historical and developmental perspectives, theoretical models in systems formulations, and integration of cultural and social structures in contextual dynamics. 3.0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2025S - Counseling Theories


    This course explores four broad categories into which the types of therapy fall: a) psychodynamic; b) behavioral and cognitive-behavioral; c) existential, humanistic, and transpersonal; and d) family systems approaches. The course surveys the history and development of each school and its views on human nature, psychological health, normal development, psychopathology, and approaches to intervention. 3.0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2031S - Assessment and Testing


    This course emphasizes humanistic perspectives in administration, interpretation, and reporting of assessment measurements using standardized empirical and phenomenological approaches. The course emphasizes clinical issues in reliability and validity, standardization and instrumentation, cultural and population specificity, and individual and contextual applications. The course provides an overview of ethics, testing objectives, and clinical implications in assessment settings. The course provides an overview of historical perspectives and theoretical models in assessment formulation. 3.0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2050S - Psychopathology and Diagnosis


    This course provides a critical overview of major schools of thought that have shaped modern thinking about various aspects of psychopathology (e.g. behavioral, biophysical, intrapsychic, phenomenological, and social) with attention to current diagnostic criteria of the DSM in relation to societal determinants of functional and dysfunctional behavior. Consideration is given to etiology, development, pathological patterns, psychotherapy, and critical evaluations of the field. Dysfunctional behavior is studied in the larger context of adaptation, self-actualization, and the development of human capacities 3.0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2060S - Human Sexuality


    Human Sexuality presents an investigation of sexuality within the larger context of the human experience. Emphasis is placed on the study of human sexual development, dimensions of sexual behavior, sex education, health issues, sex therapy, and cultural, ethical, spiritual and legal aspects of sexuality. The course emphasizes applications in clinical work with individuals and couples. 3.0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2400S - Pre-Practicum Pro-Seminar


    This course introduces and follows the student through pre-degree Practicum search and preparatory coursework. The course addresses issues in practicum placement with emphasis in professional development. Emphasis is placed on the individual student’s clarification of licensing requirements and formulation of degree course plan. This course emphasizes acculturation of the student into the clinical mental health profession. Students enroll in this course in multiple semesters: A, B, C, D. The course is required each semester the student is enrolled in pre- practicum courses. 15 Contact Hours. 0.00 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2401S - Practicum/Internship Pro-Seminar


    This course provides a residential experience to accompany students’ field experiences in Practicum, Internship 1, 2 and 3. The course addresses issues in practicum and internship training with emphasis in professional development. This course emphasizes acculturation of the student into the clinical profession of clinical mental health counseling. Additionally, the course addresses issues that emerge during practicum and internship in an intensive face-to-face group training environment. Supervision around ongoing cases, practice and refinement of clinical skills and opportunities for development of self-as-counselor are provided. Students enroll in this course in multiple semesters: A,B,C,D corresponding to each semester the student/trainee is enrolled in Practicum or Internship courses. 15 Contact Hours 0.00 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2500S - Basic Counseling Skills


    This course develops foundational clinical skills for professional work with individuals, couples, families, and groups. The course integrates humanistic theories and techniques with emphasis on self-exploration toward cultivating professional development of the counselor and psychotherapist. The course introduces foundations in clinical theory including stages of therapy, diagnostic assessment, and therapeutic intervention. The course focuses therapeutic practices including skills in developing the therapeutic container and alliance, empathic listening and reflection, unconditional positive regard, recognition of boundaries and therapeutic frame, exploration of self, sensitivity to diversity and multicultural issues, and capacity to embody an authentic sense of self as a counselor and psychotherapist. 3.0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2505S - Psychopharmacology


    Students develop a foundational understanding in psychopharmacology important to client-oriented clinical practice in counseling. Students develop skills in forming a collaborative team with the client and the prescribing health professional. The course surveys fundamental diagnoses that may be accompanied by psychotropic medications and methods to help clients monitor medication effectiveness. The course emphasizes psychoactive medications within a biopsychosocial understanding of the client. 3.0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2510S - Relationship and Family Intervention


    This course addresses philosophies and models of therapeutic intervention with couples and families. There is also a section on working with children, emphasizing work with children that include a family perspective. This course builds theoretical understanding and therapeutic skills and enlarges foundations introduced in the pre-requisite courses COUN 2500S  ”Basic Counseling Skills” and COUN 2010S  ”Structure and Dynamics of the Family.” Prerequisite(s): COUN 2500S  and COUN 2010S   3.0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2531S - Group Counseling and Psychotherapy


    This course examines philosophies and models of group counseling and psychotherapy. The course has four fundamental goals. The first is a critical analysis of contemporary theories and models of group counseling and psychotherapy. The second is to be able to identify the theories and therapeutic group approaches that best fit the context and nature of the clinical requirements and are congruent with the personality and values of the counselor and the clients. A third goal is developing sensitivity to the many ways in which one’s values and beliefs impact one’s choice of interventions. A fourth goal is to encourage reflection regarding how the insights of different approaches may be applied in a group context within a humanistic framework. 3.0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2532S - Career Development and Counseling


    This course is designed for students to gain an overview of career development theories, procedures and techniques in career counseling and career assessment tools. Empirically-based theories and counseling interventions are reviewed and examined in the context of working with diverse populations across counseling settings. 3.0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2538S - Aging and Long-Term Care


    The course goal is to broaden understanding and develop effective approaches to individual and social issues associated with aging. The course emphasizes a multi-perspective approach to aging and the challenges an aging population presents to administrators and clinicians. The course explores interventions associated with aging, mentoring in society, the renewal of eldership in society, and a paradigm for aging in place. 15 Contact Hours. 3.0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2539S - Child Abuse Assessment and Reporting


    This course will review the signs of physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse and neglect, with special attention to cultural context. The course is designed to satisfy Child Abuse Assessment and Reporting for MFT and Clinical Psychology (7 contact hours) and requirements for MFT licensure (3 contact hours) covering issues of elder abuse with additional emphasis on financial abuse. 7 Contact Hours. 0.00 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2544S - Mental Health Recovery


    This workshop provides developing clinicians with a broader and deeper understanding of those they will be serving. By inviting mental health advocates to join the conversation, stigma and stereotypes are identified and addressed. Cultural competency, recovery-oriented care, resiliency, case management, and systems of care are emphasized. 15 Contact Hours. 0.00 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2555S - Advanced Child and Adolescent Therapy


    This course is designed to build upon the Lifespan course. In this course, students will explore how development, families, and sociopolitical issues impact children and adolescents.  The course emphasizes clinical skills and therapeutic interventions for working with children, adolescents and their families in clinical, school, and community settings. 3.0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2560S - Multiculturalism and the Family Assessment


    This course explores psychological approaches in social constructs and emphasizes the following factors in individual and family development: language, acculturation, economics, race, class, gender, sexual identity, sociopolitical factors, child-rearing practices, family structure, religious traditions, cultural values and attitudes. The course focuses clinical issues of cultural competence in the context of ethics, laws, and regulations that define cultural awareness in counseling. 3.0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2561S - Substance Abuse and Behavioral Addictions


    This course provides foundational knowledge for conceptualizing, assessing, and treating substance abuse and compulsive behavioral disorders. The course examines the neurobiology of drug use and compulsive behavior within the prevailing models of addiction. The course develops understanding of drug use and addictive behavior as a biopsychosocial phenomenon that impacts individuals and communities. The course investigates the interactive process of motivating individuals for change across models of compulsive behavior, and explores treatment approaches with individuals in addiction. The course addresses ethical issues that arise in working with individuals with addictions. 3.0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2562S - Crisis and Trauma Intervention


    This course describes biological, emotional, and cognitive processes of traumatic stress and examines the nature of PTSD and other diagnoses associated with exposure to traumatic stressors. The course explores social, cultural, developmental, physiological, and psychological factors in relation to vulnerability, resiliency, and recovery. Cultural sensitivity and the importance of client advocacy and working with consumer groups in aiding recovery are emphasized. The course explores stages of assessment, intervention, and recovery in relation to early attachment, physiology, and resiliency. 3.0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2640S - Partner Abuse and Domestic Violence


    This course provides an overview of intimate partner violence, the development of violence against women as a social issue, and the responses developed by activists, therapists, and community and government agencies. It covers important issues and controversies, including obstacles in determining rates of prevalence; theories and research about causation, especially with regard to gender and culture; and individual and societal intervention and prevention efforts. Understanding these topics is important for advocates, community organizers, and researchers and demonstrating competency in many of these areas is required by various licensing boards for therapists and counselors. Students can focus on research and/or practice in various areas: men’s violence against women, female perpetrators, same sex or adolescent relationship violence, victim and family services, programs for perpetrators, and community-based prevention programs. 15 Contact Hours. 0.00 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2650S - Professional Orientation and Ethical Practice


    This course focuses understanding on ethical and legal issues involved in the conduct of working with individuals, groups, couples and families. The course emphasizes ethical and legal principles in clinical counseling, group counseling and couples and family therapy and research and evaluation. Students examine the codes of ethics of professional counseling and marriage and family therapy associations and state/provincial laws and regulations governing mental health professions. Students develop understanding of their own attitudes and perspectives on ethical dilemmas in clinical work and research. 3.0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2701S - Experiential: Basic Counseling Skills


    The course provides experiential focus for basic parameters and clinical skills needed in preparation for professional work with individuals, couples, families, and groups. The course presents foundations of growth-oriented therapeutic theories and techniques further developed in the co-required course: COUN (CO) 2500, Basic Counseling Skills. The course emphasizes personal and interpersonal practices including building therapeutic relationship, creating the therapeutic container, developing empathic listening and reflection, recognizing boundaries, developing multicultural sensitivity, and embodying authentic sense of self in the therapeutic alliance.  15 Contact Hours. Co-requisite(s): COUN 2500S   0.00 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2702S - Experiential: Structure and Dynamics of the Family


    This course supports the course description for COUN 2010: This course provides theoretical and phenomenological overview of the changing nature of family structures and dynamics through lifespan and intergenerational perspectives. The course explores the dynamics of human systems, processes in adaptation, and integrative approaches in systems interventions. The course emphasizes case description, historical and developmental perspectives, theoretical models in systems formulations, and integration of cultural and social structures in contextual dynamics.  15 Contact Hours. Co-requisite(s): COUN 2010S   0.00 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2703S - Experiential: Crisis and Trauma Intervention


    This course supports the co-required course COUN 2562. The course explores social, cultural, developmental, physiological, and psychological factors in relation to vulnerability, resiliency, and recovery. Cultural sensitivity and the importance of client advocacy and working with consumer groups in aiding recovery are emphasized. The course explores stages of assessment, intervention, and recovery in relation to early attachment, physiology, and resiliency. This experiential course will also provide time to reflect on individual responses to trauma and ways to be authentic when working with clients in trauma. 15 Contact Hours. Co-requisite(s): COUN 2562S   0.00 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2704S - Experiential: Relationship and Family Intervention


    This course is the companion course to COUN 2510. It addresses philosophies and models of therapeutic intervention with couples and families. This course builds theoretical understanding and therapeutic skills and enlarges foundations introduced in the pre-requisite courses “Basic Counseling Skills” and “Structure and Dynamics of the Family.” 15 Contact Hours. Prerequisite(s): COUN 2500S  and COUN 2510S   0.00 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2705S - Experiential: Group Counseling and Psychotherapy


    This course is the required course for the full semester course COUN 2531. During this RC experiential, students will have an opportunity to be a part of a group in order to gain a broader understanding of the group process, how it feels to be a group member, and what it is like to facilitate group work. 15 Contact Hours. 0.00 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2706S - Experiential: Child and Adolescent Counseling


    This course is designed to add to the full semester course, COUN 2555S . In this course, students will explore how development, families, and sociopolitical issues impact children and adolescents.  The course emphasizes clinical skills and therapeutic interventions for working with children, adolescents and their families in clinical, school, and community settings. 15 Contact Hours. 15 0.00 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2707S - Experiential: Counseling Theories


    This experiential provides hands on practice with viewing cases through multiple theoretical lenses, practice with applying theory-based interventions and initiates early reflections on students’ personal models of counseling. 15 residential contact hours.  Co-requisite(s): COUN 2025S   0.00 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2709S - Overview of Mental Health Counseling


    This course introduces students to the field of Mental Health Counseling. Topics covered include the basics of clinical work, case notes, consolation, and types of environments counselors often work in. Attention will also be paid to reviewing the ACA ethical code, the different organizations within the field. Students will also have an opportunity to explore the type of counseling they might want to do, how they seem themselves working in the field, and any roadblocks they may face. 15 Contact Hours. 0.00 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 6020S - Lifespan Development


    The processes and significant transition points for child, adolescent, and adult development are considered in this class. Classic and contemporary theories of development through lifespan, including some modern western perspectives, are contrasted by examining their principal concepts and uncovering their assumptions about what motivates and influences development. Topics such as mother-infant attachment, sex-role socialization, cognitive and moral development, reciprocal effects in parent-child interaction, higher stages of adult development, and the revolutionary impact of feminist theory and research on classic models of development are emphasized. 3.0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 8152S - Practicum


    This is the first of three required 3-unit field experience training courses. An approved field placement, liability insurance and enrollment in the practicum course are required. This is the first major field experience in the MA in Counseling program that requires students to provide direct counseling services at an approved mental health site. It is expected that Practicum students will work under close supervision at all times and that they will have the opportunity to work with individuals, couples, families and groups whenever possible. Practicum consists of a minimum of 100 hours of field experience including provision of 40 hours of direct counseling services. The Practicum also includes a minimum of 1 hour of weekly individual or triadic on-site supervision (one hour for every five direct hours for CA students), an average of 1.5hrs/week of university supervision, and periodic consultations between site supervisor and university faculty to assess progress and refine goals. The primary emphasis of the Counseling Practicum is on professional identity development and the development and application of counseling skills. 3.0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 8153S - Internship 1


    This is the second of three required 3-unit field experience training courses. An approved field placement, liability insurance and enrollment in the internship course are required.  It is expected that Internship students will work under close supervision at all times and that they will have the opportunity to work with individuals, couples, families and groups whenever possible. Internship 1 consists of a minimum of 300 hours of field experience including provision of 120 hours of direct counseling services. Internship 1 also includes a minimum of 1 hour of weekly individual or triadic on-site supervision (one hour for every five direct hours for CA students), an average of 1.5hrs/week of university supervision, and periodic consultations between site supervisor and university faculty to assess progress and refine goals. The primary emphasis of Internship 1 is on a more complete immersion in the role of mental health counselor, continued self-reflection, and refinement of ethical and multiculturally competent practice. 3.0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 8154S - Internship 2


    This is the third of three required 3-unit field experience training courses. An approved field placement, liability insurance and enrollment in the internship course are required.  It is expected that Internship students will work under close supervision at all times and that they will have the opportunity to work with individuals, couples, families and groups whenever possible. Internship 2 consists of a minimum of 300 hours of field experience including provision of 120 hours of direct counseling services. Internship 1 also includes a minimum of 1 hour of weekly individual or triadic on-site supervision (one hour for every five direct hours for CA students), an average of 1.5hrs/week of university supervision, and periodic consultations between site supervisor and university faculty to assess progress and refine goals. The primary emphasis of Internship 2 is to continue to refine the goals of Internship 1, and to evidence more sophisticated case conceptualization and integration of theory in to practice and increasingly evidence competence for more independent practice. 3.0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 8155S - Internship 3


    This course is required for those students needing to accrue additional field placement hours to meet the pre-degree field experience requirements for their home state. An approved field placement, liability insurance and enrollment in the internship course are required.  It is expected that Internship students will work under close supervision at all times and that they will have the opportunity to work with individuals, couples, families and groups whenever possible. The hours required for Internship 3 are determined in consultation with the Director of Clinical Training to assure alignment with state requirements. Internship 3 also includes a minimum of 1 hour of weekly individual or triadic on-site supervision (one hour for every five direct hours for CA students), an average of 1.5hrs/week of university supervision, and periodic consultations between site supervisor and university faculty to assess progress and refine goals. The primary emphasis of Internship 3 is to continue to refine the goals of Internship 2, and to increasingly evidence competence for more independent practice. 3.0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 8156S - Clinical Inter-Session


    This course is required for students who have not completed their hours during the regular fall, spring, or summer semester and have less than 60 hours remaining to complete. An approved field placement, liability insurance and enrollment in the clinical inter-session course are required.  It is expected that Clinical Inter-session students will work under close supervision at all times and that they will have the opportunity to work with individuals, couples, families and groups whenever possible. The hours required for Clinical Inter-session are determined in consultation with the course instructor to assure completion of outstanding hours. Clinical Inter-Session also includes a minimum of 1 hour of weekly individual or triadic on-site supervision (one hour for every five direct hours for CA students), an average of 1.5hrs/week of university supervision, and periodic consultations between site supervisor and university faculty to assess progress and refine goals. The primary emphasis Clinical Inter-session is to provide continuity and a supportive educational environment for students who do not complete required hours during the regular academic semester. 0.00 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 9100S - Comprehensive Exam


    The Counseling Comprehensive Exam requires an individual tutorial with the examining faculty as a capstone for the MA in Counseling. The examination process requires demonstrated understanding of clinical foundations, therapeutic skills, and applications in clinical evaluation and crisis management; treatment plan and treatment interventions; ethics, law, and professional standards; systemic and integrative therapeutic models; and therapeutic alliance. 0.00 credit(s)
 

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