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    Saybrook University
   
 
  Jun 20, 2024
 
2023-2024 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook 
    
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2023-2024 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook [Archived Catalog]

College of Integrative Medicine and Health Sciences


Department of Applied Psychophysiology

Department of Integrative and Functional Nutrition

Department of Integrative Social Work

Department of Mind-Body Medicine

College Description

Mission Statement 

Influenced by humanistic principles and values, the College of Integrative Medicine and Health Sciences (CIMHS) empowers faculty and students to apply their knowledge and skills to facilitate mind, body, and spirit wellness in personal and professional life.  Recognizing the importance of collaborative, person-centered care strategies, CIMHS embraces an educational model that endorses a range of health-related disciplines, scholarship, evidence-based practices, and skill development. CIMHS is dedicated to promoting interdisciplinary modalities and scholarship that enhance optimal health and well-being for individuals and communities

Graduate Degrees and Programs

CIMHS offers M.S. and Ph.D. graduate degrees and certificate programs in Mind-Body Medicine (MBM), Integrative and Functional Nutrition (IFN), Integrative Social Work (ISW), and Applied Psychophysiology (APH). These academic programs combine cutting-edge curricula with a university-wide emphasis on student-centered learning and faculty engagement.

The master's degrees and doctoral specializations are designed for professionals from diverse career fields who wish to expand their expertise in health, wellness, and resilience.  The degrees prepare students for clinical practice, organizational leadership, academic teaching, program and policy reform, and research in health and wellness. In addition, CIMHS students may add a minor, specialization, or certificate to their general degree requirements if they are interested in extending their knowledge or skill set in a specific discipline. The M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, with their optional minors and specializations, include:

MS Integrative and Functional Nutrition

  • Minor in Integrative Wellness Coaching
  • Minor in Mind-Body Medicine

MS Mind-Body Medicine

  • Minor in Integrative Wellness Coaching
  • Minor in Integrative and Functional Nutrition

MS Psychophysiology

  • Science and Research Specialization 
  • Optimal Performance Specialization

PhD in Applied Psychophysiology

  • Clinical Psychophysiology Specialization 
  • Optimal Functioning Specialization 
  • General/Investigational Specialization

PhD in Integrative and Functional Nutrition

  • Minor in Integrative Wellness Coaching
  • Minor in Mind-Body Medicine

PhD in Integrative Social Work

  • Integrative Gerontology Studies Specialization
  • Integrative Community Studies Specialization
  • Legal Studies Specialization

PhD in Mind-Body Medicine

  • Applied Psychophysiology Specialization 
  • Contemplative End-of-Life-Care Specialization 
  • Integrative and Functional Nutrition Specialization 
  • Integrative Mental Health Specialization 
  • Integrative Wellness Coaching Specialization 
  • Mindful Leadership in Healthcare Specialization

College Specific Policies

CIMHS Academic Writing Class

The 3-credit MBM5507 Graduate Academic Writing class is a required class for all CIMHS students, except for students in the MS Degree in Sport Performance Psychology.
 
The department chair may require a writing sample for select applicants based on evidence of writing challenges in applicant’s admissions material, including grammatical mistakes, spelling errors, or poorly organized text. 
In some instances, students may request to waive the MBM5507 Graduate Academic Writing course and substitute an open elective at the department chair’s discretion. The department chair will make the determination based on any one of three criteria: (a) students may document solo-authored professional publications in a peer-reviewed journal, (b) per our institutional transfer credit policy, students may document completion of an equivalent 3-credit graduate-level writing course within the past 10 years and earned a grade of B or better, or (c) students may submit an optional writing sample, and achieve a score of 90% or better on the writing sample grading rubric.

Each degree program will differently accommodate the three credits for the MBM5507 Graduate Academic Writing Course

CIMHS Policies on Academic Performance, Professional Behavior, and Remediation

I. Competency Expectations

Students are accountable for adequately managing any personal issues that impact on their academic performance, ethical conduct, and professionalism. The CIMHS Department Chair and members of the program’s academic review team may be called upon to assess problems related to competence and suitability for program progression at any point in the program. In addition, students are expected to adhere to all university-wide policies (e.g., Student Code of Conduct; Student Academic Progress; Professional Comportment). Please note that this policy is independent from other university-wide policies. Refer to the catalog for a full review of Saybrook University policies.

Academic Performance

A student may exhibit problems of competence within the domain of academic performance if one or more of the following have occurred. This list is not exhaustive and the review committee for each CIMHS department retains the right to determine if there are significant concerns regarding academic performance.

  • Failed course(s)
  • Failed coursework across multiple courses or within a single course
  • Failed milestone(s) (e.g., provisional acceptance, mid-program evaluation, and dissertation orals and/or final defense)
  • Low student engagement (e.g., not participating regularly in discussion boards)
  • Timeliness concerns regarding submitted coursework and/or violations of the department’s late policy (if applicable)
  • Incomplete attendance at a Residential Conference (e.g., arriving late and/or departing early from conference without permission; arriving late and/or departing early from lectures during the conference)
  • Plagiarism and/or significant difficulties with authentic writing as outlined in Saybrook University’s Policy on Academic Honesty (Plagiarism) and Authorship (e.g., copying someone’s work; sabotaging someone’s work; not paraphrasing sufficiently in one’s own words; taking credit for others’ ideas; copying and pasting from other sources; improper or lack of use of APA in-text citations and references; etc.)
  • Self-plagiarism (e.g., submitting coursework from a previous course without instructor pre-approval)
  • Enrollment in the dissertation proposal for more than two years without making progress will result in a formal review
  • Failure to meet academic standards/expectations as outlined in a remediation plan
Ethical Conduct

A student may exhibit problems of competence within the domain of ethical conduct if one or more of the following have occurred. This list is not exhaustive and the review committee for each CIMHS department retains the right to determine if there are significant concerns regarding:

  • Violation of any of the enforceable standards outlined in the APA and other relevant professional ethics codes during performance of academic, research, clinical (IMH and IFN students), and/or professional tasks
  • Inappropriate ethical decision-making methods or outcomes (e.g., not seeking consultation for an ethical dilemma; not recognizing an ethical dilemma when it occurs)
  • Behavior that is in violation of applicable state or federal law(s)
Professionalism

In addition to adherence to Saybrook University policies and procedures, CIMHS students are expected to integrate/adopt proper professional standards or best practices into their personal and professional development. They are also expected to abide by any laws and regulations pertaining to their scope of practice.

A student may exhibit problems of competence within the domain of professionalism if one or more of the following have occurred. This list is not exhaustive and the review committee for each CIMHS department retains the right to determine if there are significant concerns regarding professionalism.

  • Inability or unwillingness to incorporate feedback
  • Difficulties regarding interpersonal communication, such as:
    • Use of insults
    • Repeated conflict with peers, faculty, staff and/or leadership administration
    • Poor or hostile communication
    • Difficulties working as part of a team
    • Threats of retaliation
    • Threats of violence
    • Demonstrations of hate speech, prejudice, and/or bigotry
    • Disrespectful written correspondence and/or video/phone etiquette
    • Demonstration of harmful personal biases
    • Inability or unwillingness to engage in self-reflection
    • Inappropriate professional dress or attire
  • Inappropriate and/or unprofessional behavior at a Residential Conference. This may include, but is not limited to the following:
    • Hostile communication
    • Bizarre, threatening, or disturbing behavior
    • Attending lectures under the influence of substances and/or in a compromised state (e.g., alcohol, illicit drugs, prescribed drugs, etc.)
    • Disrespect toward hotel staff, catering staff, and/or Saybrook University community members (e.g., students, faculty, employees, administration, University guests, invited speakers, significant others also in attendance, etc.)
    • Violations of Saybrook University’s Student Code of Conduct and/or Title IX guidelines on discriminatory and harassing behavior
  • Failure to meet professionalism standards/expectations as outlined in a remediation plan
II. Identification of Students with Problems of Competence

It is important to identify students with potential problems of competence as early as possible to protect the public and facilitate student success. The CIMHS Department Chair should be first notified of potential problems of competence, and the respective department chair may then request an informal or formal review. The identification can happen via multiple channels and at any time:

  • The department’s academic review committee may identify potential problems of competence during the programmatic evaluation process (e.g., the MBM Progressions Policy)
  • A student may self-disclose or self-identify potential problems of competence
  • A student may observe potential problems of competence in a peer
  • A faculty member may observe and report potential problems of competence in a student
  • A staff person may observe and report potential problems of competence in a student
  • Failed coursework, failed milestones, and/or unsatisfactory progression may trigger a formal review
Informal Resolutions

Minor issues regarding problems of competence will be resolved informally. This may involve feedback from a peer advisor, teaching assistant, faculty member, department chair, etc. When initial concerns arise, CIMHS faculty members will provide initial feedback and mentorship. If an individual does not feel comfortable seeking informal resolution and/or it would be inappropriate to do so, they should consult with their department chair for guidance.

Formal Review Procedures

CIMHS department’s academic review committee will review Level 1-3 cases and determine the next steps involving communication and remediation.

Level 1: Minor Issues Involving Lack of Progression and/or Lack of Competency

  • This level includes less serious issues that can potentially be resolved during one semester.
  • Examples may include, but are not limited to: A one-time offense regarding authentic writing; misrepresenting credentials; clinical evaluation with only one or two areas evaluated as below “clearly adequate”; a single instance of interpersonal conflict that reflects poor communication skills; consultation with faculty

Level 2: Moderate Issues Involving Lack of Progression and/or Lack of Competency

  • This level includes more serious issues that require careful planning and collaboration on the part of the faculty and student to address the problem.
  • Examples may include but are not limited to: Repeated instances of difficulties with authentic writing; repeated hostile communication and/or interpersonal conflict with a single individual

Level 3: Serious Problems of Lack of Progress or Lack of Competency

  • This level includes much more serious issues that are threats to program completion and/or the profession. Level III concerns may result in dismissal from the CIMHS degree program.
  • Examples may include but are not limited to: Severe academic dishonesty; serious ethical violations; harm to clients; multiple failed courses; unresponsiveness to a previously constructed remediation plan; repeated hostile communication and/or interpersonal conflict with multiple Saybrook University community members.
III. Remediation Plans and Dismissal
Remediation Plans

If the CIMHS Department Chair determines a remediation plan is necessary, a meeting will be scheduled with the student. A remediation plan may include but is not limited to the following: additional coursework, adjustment of academic workload, enrollment in a writing course, written apologies, self-structured behavior change, and new learning experiences.

The department’s academic review committee will determine if a remediation plan has been successfully completed based on the unique timeframe included in the plan and required tasks for each student. If the remediation plan requirements are met, the student will remain in good standing. If a remediation plan has not been successfully completed, the committee will work with the student to identify obstacles. If there is forward progression and high student engagement, the committee may recommend further remediation (e.g., additional timeframe; additional requirements). If there is not forward progression, the committee may recommend dismissal from the program.

Potential Dismissal

The dismissal of a student is a serious matter and, in general, denotes unresolved issues related to inadequate academic progression and/or problems of competence. The reasons listed below are examples of what may reflect grounds for dismissal from the program:

  • Receipt of three grades of “No Credit” or letter grades of “C” or below in a single semester or same course or cumulatively
  • Inability to successfully pass a core program requirement after two attempts
  • Failure to meet the minimum cumulative GPA requirement of 3.0 for three consecutive semesters
  • Pattern of repeated unethical or unprofessional behavior (see Saybrook Student Code of Conduct, CIMHS policies, and relevant state and federal guidelines)
  • Unsatisfactory progress in the dissertation phase (two or more years in the dissertation proposal)
  • Grounds for immediate dismissal may include, but are not limited to: Inappropriate, discriminatory, and/or prejudiced speech; violence or threats of violence; egregious violations of the APA ethics code; violations of federal and/or state laws; repeated difficulties with plagiarism and/or authentic writing; discriminatory or offensive language or behavior; misrepresentation of academic or professional credential(s) before, during, or after the program application process. Repeated offenses at Level II or III could result in immediate dismissal.

When evaluating the decision to dismiss a student from the program, the faculty may seek professional consultation both within the university and in some instances outside the university to determine the most appropriate course(s) of action (in accordance with FERPA and other relevant laws). The College Dean and the Vice President for Academic Affairs may also be notified of the decision.

If immediate dismissal is indicated, the CIMHS Dean and Department Chair will notify the student in writing that they have been dismissed from the program, effective immediately. The student may appeal an immediate dismissal decision, as outlined in Section V.

If a student is dismissed from the program or voluntarily chooses to withdraw from the program, any relevant report specific to problems of competence and/or behavior will be considered if the student decides to reapply. Readmittance to the program is not guaranteed.

IV. Appeals Procedure

Students who disagree with a remediation plan and/or dismissal decision may submit a formal written appeal. Reasons for appeal are limited to include: a procedural violation of policy; new evidence.

There are three levels of appeal:

Level 1 (Department Chair): A student should submit their formal written appeal to the Department Chair within 10 business days of their disposition notification. In the written appeal, the student should clearly provide a rationale for their reason to appeal. The Department Chair has 10 business days to consider the appeal and provide a formal response to the student.

Level 2 (College Dean): If the student would like to appeal the determination made by the Department Chair, they may file an appeal with the College Dean for secondary review within 10 business days of receiving the Department Chair’s decision. The College Dean has 10 business days to consider the appeal and provide a formal response to the student.

Level 3 (Vice President for Academic Affairs): If the student would like to appeal the determination made by the College Dean, they may file an appeal with the Vice President for Academic Affairs for review within 10 business days of receiving the College Dean’s decision. The Vice President for Academic Affairs has 10 business days to consider the appeal and provide a formal response to the student. The decision of the Vice President for Academic Affairs is final.

CIMHS Distance Learning Model

Most of the coursework is conducted online and at a distance, so students can live and work anywhere in the world as they engage with CIMHS faculty and peers. Classes incorporate a variety of instructional and assessment methods including asynchronous discussion forums, live video conferences, interactive web-based activities, and written assignments. In addition, the MBM, ISW, and APH departments utilize virtual and in-person learning experiences for face-to-face training, to support online classes. These residential conferences are usually held at the start of the spring and fall semesters.

Courses for graduate degrees in the CIMHS are offered during three semesters each year: fall, spring, and summer. Fall and spring semesters each have two 7-week terms (A and B) and one semester long term of 15-weeks. The summer semester has one term of 8 weeks or 12 weeks.

CIMHS Virtual Student Orientations, Virtual Learning Experiences, Residential Learning Conferences, and Community Learning Experience

All new students in the College of Integrative Medicine and Health Sciences participate in a virtual orientation (VO) in the fall, spring, and summer semesters. During the VO, the students are introduced to Saybrook University’s administrative staff, faculty, current students and University-wide policies. Students are oriented to technology, student services, library databases, and more. 
 
New MBM and ISW degree program students participate in the MBM 0505 Mind-Body-Spirit Integration (MBSI) Seminar. The MBSI consists of two full days of experiential learning, and four 4-hour virtual sessions on consecutive Saturdays. See the course descriptions for requirements. The MBSI is offered in a face-to-face format during the semesters when the university conducts a face-to-face Community Learning Experience.  In other semesters, the MBSI is offered virtually. Students may opt to delay the MBSI to attend a face-to-face or virtual version. 
 
New students in the Applied Psychophysiology degree programs are required to attend a five-day Virtual or Residential Learning Experience.  The Department will schedule these five-day conferences virtually or face-to-face, and inform the new students.
 
The number of required virtual or residential learning experiences for continuing CIMHS students varies by degree program and selected coursework. Review the degree program requirements for more information about the requirements.  

Community Learning Experience

Every autumn in even calendar years, all departments gather for a university-wide face-to-face Community Learning Experience (CLE). Students in the Department of Applied Psychophysiology are required to attend. Other students in CIMHS are strongly encouraged to attend. The CLE provides valuable contact with faculty, a wide variety of educational and training classes, and interaction with students across degree programs.

Faculty Directory

Faculty in the College of Mind-Body Medicine include world-renowned scholar-practitioners, many of whom lead professional organizations, direct community health centers, conduct research, publish scholarly articles and books, deliver keynote speeches and workshops around the country and the world, and develop protocols for treatments that support and complement those used in conventional, Western medicine. 
The College has three categories of instructors: (a) core faculty, who are salaried and provide extensive participation in student instruction, student advising, and research, and in departmental and university governance, (b) adjunct faculty, who are contracted to teach by the course and who may also serve in student’s research, and (c) teaching fellows, who are contracted to teach specific courses. Teaching Fellows are either advanced doctoral students or recent doctoral graduates, who provide course instruction under supervision by core faculty. Biographies and photographs of all categories of faculty are included in the Faculty Directory, along with description of their research expertise and interests. The Faculty Directory is available at: Faculty Directory Index - Saybrook University.

Department of Applied Psychophysiology

Department Description

Applied Psychophysiology is the sub-specialty of psychophysiology which uses knowledge of the biological bases of various behaviors in conjunction with numerous psychological techniques to help people moderate illness-related symptoms and optimize their behavior in the sports, educational, and business environments. 
 
Applied Psychophysiologists are professionals who develop and use behavioral assessments and interventions based on such areas as behavioral genetics, hormonal influence on behavior, individual differences in perception, and abnormal physiological patterns. They assist clients in recognizing and altering problems caused by these biological underpinnings. Common psychophysiological intervention techniques include biofeedback, relaxation training, hypnosis, neurofeedback, stress management, among others. 
 
The Department of Psychophysiology, within the College of Integrative Medicine and Health Sciences at Saybrook University, provides a PhD in Applied Psychophysiology with three doctoral level specializations to prepare graduates to pursue careers in a professional practice informed by a scientific understanding of mind and body.  The Department also offers a Master’s Degree in Psychophysiology  with a Science and Research Specialization or an Optimal Performance Specialization.  Also available is a Master’s Degree in Sport Performance Psychology.

Values, Mission, and Learning Outcomes

Department Mission Statement

Promoting the science behind mind-body medicine by advancing applied psychophysiology to empower resilience, self-regulation, human well-being, performance optimization and holistic health.

Department Values

  1. Excellence: We are committed to achieving excellence in all aspects of our work, from research and interventions to education and service delivery. We strive for the highest standards of quality, innovation, and professionalism. 
  2. Empowerment: We believe in empowering individuals to take an active role in their own well-being. We provide tools, knowledge, and support to promote self-awareness, self-regulation, and personal growth. 
  3. Collaboration: We value collaboration and believe in the power of interdisciplinary partnerships. By working together with experts from various fields, we can expand our understanding of psychophysiology and develop comprehensive approaches to address complex challenges.
  4. Evidence-Based Practice: We are dedicated to using evidence-based practices and integrating scientific research into our work. We continually seek to stay up-to-date with the latest research findings and incorporate them into our interventions and services.  
  5. Compassion: We approach our work with empathy, compassion, and respect for the unique needs and experiences of individuals. We create a supportive and non-judgmental environment where people feel safe to explore and address their psychophysiological concerns. 
  6. Ethical Conduct: We uphold the highest standards of ethical conduct in all our interactions and research activities. We prioritize the well-being and confidentiality of individuals, ensuring their rights and privacy are protected. 
  7. Lifelong Learning: We promote a culture of lifelong learning and professional development among our team members. We encourage continuous growth, exploration of new ideas, and ongoing education to enhance our knowledge and skills in the field of applied psychophysiology.
  8. Impact and Practical Application: We are driven by the desire to make a meaningful and practical impact on individuals, communities, and society as a whole. We strive to translate research findings into actionable strategies and interventions that can improve the lives of those we serve. 
  9. Integrity: We conduct ourselves with integrity, honesty, and transparency in all our interactions. We prioritize trust and accountability in our relationships with students, colleagues, and stakeholders. 
  10. Cultural Sensitivity: We recognize and respect the diversity of cultures, backgrounds, and beliefs. We strive to provide inclusive and culturally sensitive education that is responsive to the unique needs and values of individuals and communities.

Program Learning Outcomes

  1. Assess and appraise knowledge of the biological basis of behavior and accurately relate and interpret behavioral dysfunctions to underlying biological dysfunctions. 
  2. Evaluate and interpret psychophysiological recording methodology and set, monitor, recognize and consistently perform correct recordings utilizing psychophysiological equipment. 
  3. Create, organize, and conduct independent psychophysiological research studies utilizing accepted design and analysis techniques so that students recognize common mistakes in published studies involving design and analysis and can teach others how to do so. 
  4. Explain and assess the physiological and stress responses underlying both behavioral and physiological sequences impacting optimal functioning, in order to design and conduct appropriate training utilizing psychophysiologically based techniques to optimize functioning in business, education, sports, and (when appropriately licensed) clinical environments. 
  5. Explain and integrate ethical principles and professional practice standards, as promulgated by the field’s professional organizations, within the field of applied psychophysiology. 

Department Programs and Specializations

Ph.D. Applied Psychophysiology  

  • Specializations: Clinical, Optimal Functioning, General-Investigational

M.S. Psychophysiology  

  • Specializations: Science and Research, Optimal Performance

M.S. Sport Performance Psychology  

Department Specific Policies

In addition to the Saybrook University Learning Experiences, students in the Applied Psychophysiology Department are strongly encouraged to attend each Annual Meeting of the Association of Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback.

Mid-Program Review

The Mid-Program Review for the Department of Applied Psychophysiology is in revision and details will be available soon.

Department of Integrative and Functional Nutrition

Department Description

Saybrook’s Integrative and Functional Nutrition (IFN) Department is a leading on-line graduate-level nutrition education department known for quality instruction, innovative coursework, reputable faculty, impactful research, and influential graduates. The IFN Department was designed to educate the next generation of nutrition professionals. Graduates of this program will be prepared to apply advanced evidence-based nutritional approaches to effectively address conditions ranging from obesity and high blood pressure to depression and chronic pain. Declining global health dictates a greater need for well-trained, competent nutrition practitioners across healthcare settings.  This need is not being met by current educational models.  Thus, CIMHS has created an Integrative and Functional Nutrition Department to prepare future nutrition leaders in the health field. With courses that study nutritional biochemistry and physiology, functional nutrition assessment methodologies, and integrative nutritional therapies, this program equips its students with cutting-edge knowledge, skills, and competencies to be professional nutrition practitioners addressing world-wide health concerns of individuals and communities. 
 
Integrative and functional nutritionists recognize how physical health is influenced by biological, environmental, behavioral, and emotional factors. They apply knowledge from biological and nutritional sciences to the results from comprehensive nutritional assessments to inform nutritional diagnoses and develop personalized nutrition care plans to help clients achieve optimal health and vitality. 
 
Saybrook’s PhD in Integrative and Functional Nutrition prepares its graduates to use an evidence-based, holistic approach that applies the knowledge of functional biochemistry to assess body dysfunctions and incorporate environmental, social, physiological, and psychological sciences to provide person-centered, integrative care.  This program is ideal for current nutrition professionals seeking a terminal degree that will distinguish them as experts in the field; non-nutrition health practitioners seeking to complement their existing skillset; and professionals from non-scientific backgrounds who are prepared to transition themselves into the field of advanced, applied nutritional sciences.

Values, Mission, and Learning Outcomes

Department Mission Statement

Mission: Train nutritionists and researchers to humanely apply the best available science to nutrition care with the goal of nourishing people, building vibrant communities and the restoration of a healthy planet.

Department Values

Influenced by humanistic principles and values, the College of Integrative and Health Sciences and the Department of Integrative and Functional Nutrition (IFN) empowers faculty and students to apply their knowledge and skills to facilitate mind, body, and spirit wellness in personal and professional life. Recognizing the importance of collaborative, person-centered care strategies, IFN embraces an educational model that endorses a range of health-related disciplines, scholarship, evidence-based practices, and self-care. 
 
The values of the IFN Department include:  

  1. Offer a humanistic and collaborative learning environment across disciplines. ​ 
  2. Promote person-centered health and wellness strategies.​ 
  3. Encourage self-care practices.​ 
  4. Empower individuals to apply their knowledge and skills in their personal and professional life.

Program Learning Outcomes

M.S. Learning Outcomes 

  1. Apply evidence-based integrative and functional nutrition approaches to comprehensively assess and promote the health and wellness of diverse individuals and communities.   
  2. Critically evaluate and utilize evidence-based resources to inform professional practice.   
  3. Explain the science of integrative and functional nutrition in health promotion and disease prevention and management to lay audiences and health professionals.  
  4. Apply knowledge of biochemical, physiological, and psychosocial sciences to assess nutritional status and design integrative interventions.   
  5. Identify and articulate the ethical, humanistic, and legal guidelines for professional nutrition practitioners.   

 
Ph.D. Learning Outcomes 

  1. Apply evidence-based integrative and functional nutrition approaches to comprehensively assess and promote the health and wellness of diverse individuals and communities.   
  2. Critically evaluate and utilize evidence-based resources to inform professional practice.   
  3. Explain the science of integrative and functional nutrition in health promotion and disease prevention and management to lay audiences and health professionals.  
  4. Apply knowledge of biochemical, physiological, and psychosocial sciences to assess nutritional status and design integrative interventions.   
  5. Identify and articulate the ethical, humanistic, and legal guidelines for professional nutrition practitioners.   
  6. Synthesize nutrition research to identify information gaps in the literature and articulate implications for future research. 
  7. Propose and conduct a quality research study and present the findings to professional audiences. 

 
MS to PhD Pathway Learning Outcomes 

  1. Apply evidence-based integrative and functional nutrition approaches to comprehensively assess and promote the health and wellness of diverse individuals and communities.   
  2. Critically evaluate and utilize evidence-based resources to inform professional practice.   
  3. Explain the science of integrative and functional nutrition in health promotion and disease prevention and management to lay audiences and health professionals.  
  4. Apply knowledge of biochemical, physiological, and psychosocial sciences to assess nutritional status and design integrative interventions.   
  5. Identify and articulate the ethical, humanistic, and legal guidelines for professional nutrition practitioners.   
  6. Synthesize nutrition research to identify information gaps in the literature and articulate implications for future research. 
  7. Propose and conduct a quality research study and present the findings to professional audiences.

Department Programs and Specializations

Ph.D. Integrative and Functional Nutrition  

  • Two Minor Options: Integrative Wellness Coaching or Mind-Body Medicine 

M.S. Integrative and Functional Nutrition  

  • Two Minor Options: Integrative Wellness Coaching or Mind Body Medicine 

M.S.-to-Ph.D. Pathway Integrative and Functional Nutrition  

  • Two Minor Options: Integrative Wellness Coaching or Mind Body Medicine 

Department Specific Policies

CIMHS Policies on Academic Performance, Professional Behavior, and Remediation   
 
IFN Course Policies 

Department of Integrative Social Work​

Department Description

Integrative social work (ISW) is an approach to social work that considers the entire person, mind, body, and spirit, within a community and societal perspective. ISW is holistic, person-centered, and mindful. ISW also adopts the de-colonizing and global perspectives, embracing social justice and social equity for all elements in society. Saybrook’s PhD in integrative social work is evidence-based, informed by a scientific understanding of self-in-society. Students will access research, critically evaluate the credibility of research, conduct independent research, and translate research findings for application in their professional work. 
 
The ISW doctoral degree program is attuned to the traditions of social work, and to the social justice, social equity, and social transformation that are at the core of the mission of Saybrook University. This curriculum is designed to appeal to applicants with MSW degrees, with an interest in administration, consulting, teaching, research, and policymaking. By the end of the program, students will be prepared to work as administrators, teachers, consultants, and practitioners in academic, community, corporate, and clinical settings. 

Values, Mission, and Learning Outcomes 

Department Mission Statement

Mission: To educate doctoral-level social work professionals who will serve as scholar-practitioners, healthcare and public health administrators, organizational consultants, and university educators. 
 
Vision: The Department of Integrative Social Work (ISW) embraces the vision of the College of Integrative Medicine and Health Sciences (CIMHS). Influenced by humanistic principles and values, CIMHS empowers faculty and students to apply their knowledge and skills to facilitate mind, body, and spirit wellness in personal and professional life. Recognizing the importance of collaborative, person-centered care strategies, CIMHS embraces an educational model that endorses a range of health-related disciplines, scholarship, evidence-based practices and skill development. CIMHS is dedicated to promoting interdisciplinary modalities and scholarship that enhance optimal health and wellbeing for individuals and communities.  
The ISW emphasizes core values embraced by social workers throughout the profession’s history, include: Service, social justice, the dignity and worth of the person, the importance of human relationships, integrity, and competence. 

Department Values

The PhD in Integrative Social Work Department is dedicated to a holistic, person-centered, evidence-informed, and integrative perspective on the practice of social work with diverse populations.

Program Learning Outcomes

Students completing the PhD Degree in Integrative Social Work will be able to: 
 

  1. Examine and analyze the traditional community and societal values of the social work profession and their application to the changing landscape of the 21st century. 
  2. Explain the influence of social policy, public health programs, and advocacy on general health and well-being and the implications for individuals, organizations, and/or communities. 
  3. Apply multicultural competencies and diversity awareness, and support health equity and social justice in healthcare, society, and law. 
  4. Engage, assess, and intervene with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. 
  5. Critically evaluate methodologies, apply published research, and conduct independent research to investigate contemporary issues with community and society.  
  6. Assess and synthesize evidence, theories, and informed practices/interventions in integrative social work. 

Department Programs and Specializations

Ph.D. Integrative Social Work  

  • Integrative Community Studies Specialization
  • Integrative Gerontology Studies Specialization
  • Legal Studies Specialization

Legal Studies Certificate  

Department of Mind-Body Medicine

Department Description

Mind-body medicine is known as one of the leading complementary approaches in healthcare. In the past five years alone, thousands of studies have documented the therapeutic benefits of mind-body therapies on physical, mental, and emotional health. 
 
Applying the principles and evidence supporting the effectiveness of mind-body approaches for health outcomes and overall wellbeing, students enrolled in Mind-Body Medicine (MBM) programs integrate the philosophy, science, and techniques of mind-body medicine in their personal and professional work. The curriculum presents a foundation of scholarship across the CIMHS departments, representing domains of integrative healthcare, mind-body science, practice, advanced research, and ethics.  To expand their knowledge and focus of study in a specific discipline, students may choose to add a specialization in applied psychophysiology, contemplative end-of-life care, integrative and functional nutrition, integrative mental health, integrative wellness coaching, and mindful leadership in healthcare.

Values, Mission, and Learning Outcomes

Department Mission Statement

The mission of the Department of Mind-Body Medicine is to educate professionals in evidence-based mind-body applications to health and wellness in their work as educators, practitioners, and researchers.

Department Values

Influenced by humanistic principles and values, the College of Integrative and Health Sciences and the Department of Mind-Body Medicine (MBM) empowers faculty and students to apply their knowledge and skills to facilitate mind, body, and spirit wellness in personal and professional life. Recognizing the importance of collaborative, person-centered care strategies, MBM embraces an educational model that endorses a range of health-related disciplines, scholarship, evidence-based practices, and self-care.

Program Learning Outcomes

  1. Explain the influence of biopsychosocial factors on general health and wellbeing and the implications for individuals, organizations, and/or communities.   
  2. Describe and apply the foundational values, ethical principles, and best practices of the field to oneself and others.   
  3. Apply cultural humility, diversity awareness, and inclusion to support health equity and social justice in healthcare systems.   
  4. Articulate the application of self-reflection and self-care skills.   
  5. Assess and synthesize evidence, theories, and established practices in integrative healthcare.   
  6. Critically evaluate research methods, apply published research, and/or conduct independent research in the field.   
  7. Compose original, grammatically correct, coherent, concise, and well-articulated written work in APA style.

Department Programs and Specializations

M.S. Mind-Body Medicine  

Ph.D. Mind-Body Medicine  

Ph.D. Mind-Body Medicine, Applied Psychophysiology Specialization  

Ph.D. Mind-Body Medicine, Contemplative End of Life Care Specialization  

Ph.D. Mind-Body Medicine, Integrative Mental Health Specialization  

Ph.D. Mind-Body Medicine, Integrative Wellness Coaching Specialization  

Ph.D. Mind-Body Medicine, Integrative and Functional Nutrition Specialization  

Ph.D. Mind-Body Medicine, Mindful Leadership in Healthcare Specialization  

Contemplative End of Life Care Certificate   

Integrative Wellness Coaching Certificate  

Mind-Body Medicine Certificate  

Mindfulness Applications Certificate  

Department Specific Policies

  1. CIMHS Policies on Academic Performance, Professional Behavior, and Remediation   
  2. MBM Academic Progressions Policy (Assessing Basic Academic Writing Skills, PhD Mid-Program Review, Assessing Dissertation Proposal Readiness)   
  3. MBM Assignment Submission Policy

Mid-Program Review

MBM 8000 Ph.D. Mid-Program Review  
 
As part of the PhD MBM programmatic review and progressions audit, all doctoral students with or without specializations will participate in a mid-program review of their academic performance and scholarly writing skills. 
 
By year three (or whenever all prerequisites have been met), students will be enrolled in a 0-credit, semester-long Mid-Program Review course before they proceed to the advanced research sequence. Refer to the MBM Progression Policy to review the details of the two key assignments and evaluation process. Registration for this course requires the department chair’s approval. Prerequisite(s): MBM 0505 Mind-Body-Spirit Integration Seminar, MBM 5500 Ethics in Healthcare, MBM 5681 Psychophysiology of the Human Stress Response, MBM 5690 Complementary and Integrative Medicine, MBM 5710 Mind-Body Therapies and Practices, RES 2100 Research Foundations and Literacy, RES 2300 Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis and RES 2500 Quantitative Data Collection and Statistics.