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2019-2020 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook
Saybrook University
   
 
  Jun 01, 2020
 
2019-2020 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook 
    
2019-2020 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook [Archived Catalog]

Course Descriptions


Courses are identified and organized by degree program. Listed below are those courses for the 2019-2020 academic school year. CampusVue will list courses open for enrollment each semester, by Section if applicable. Not all courses are offered every semester. 

College of Integrative Medicine and Health Sciences (CIMHS)

All courses are online.  Each course description includes information about the term in which it is offered every academic year, as well as any prerequisites and residential conference (RC) requirements.  Students registered for an online course that requires residential training must attend the specific RC component to remain enrolled. 

 

 

Practice

  
  •  

    MBM 5720 - Narrative Approaches in Healthcare


    This course presents a framework for the use of narrative approaches in clinical, research, and educational settings. Beginning with a brief overview of the history of Narrative Based Medicine (NBM), the curriculum introduces the relevant competencies, skills, and best practices within the field of NBM. Throughout the modules, students will learn how to collect and interpret narrative-based information as an approach to bridging the gap between patient/practitioner experience and the mechanization of healthcare practice. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Summer. Course Length: 8 weeks. No RC.

Psychophysiology

  
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    APH 5052 - Fundamentals of Psychophysiology Supplement


    This Supplement course is intended to bridge the gap between course material in Biological Bases of Behavior (PSY 3025) and Fundamentals of Psychophysiology (APH 5051) for students enrolled in the PhD Clinical Psychology (CP) degree program. APH 5051 provides more depth to many of the topics covered in both courses and emphasizes psychophysiological principles and practices including the psychophysiological bases upon which most psychophysiological systems and senses change and are recorded. The Supplements course also emphasizes assessments and interventions for psychophysiological dysfunctions. Students learn to integrate these principles into their client interactions to improve clinical and coaching outcomes.


    Each student in APH 5052 is required to review the pre-recorded lectures assigned in the APH 5051 course.  The instructor in APH 5052 will assess each student for any gaps in basic knowledge and may assign specific readings from the APH 5051 texts and text files, specific review questions, and additional assignments to remediate any gaps.

      0 credit(s)
    Course Length: 8 weeks

  
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    PH 500A - Psychophysiology Proseminar - General Biology


    Students needing to meet the prerequisite of having had an undergraduate course in general biology will register for one credit of the Psychophysiology Proseminar part A - General Biology. Credits taken as part of fulfilling the prerequisites do not count toward the doctoral degree but do count toward full time status. The overall objective is for students to learn material and concepts within the subject matter of the course which is needed to form a solid basis for performing graduate level work in psychophysiology. Students will become familiar with the concepts and material usually covered in the course by doing readings in the assigned standard text and other materials, individual real-time discussions with faculty via the web, and developing answers to topic related questions. 1 credit(s)
  
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    PH 500B - Psychophysiology Proseminar - General Psychology


    Students needing to meet the prerequisite of having had an undergraduate course in general psychology will register for one credit of the Psychophysiology Proseminar part B - General Psychology. Credits taken as part of fulfilling the prerequisites do not count toward the doctoral degree but do count toward full time status. The overall objective is for students to learn material and concepts within the subject matter of the course which is needed to form a solid basis for performing graduate level work in psychophysiology. Students will become familiar with the concepts and material usually covered in the course by doing readings in the assigned standard text and other materials, individual real-time discussions with faculty via the web, and developing answers to topic related questions. 1 credit(s)
  
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    PH 505 - Introduction to Psychophysiology


    This course explores the manifold ways the brain and body work together to produce behavior and the cycle between behavior and physiology. The course begins with a description of the body’s organizational structure and genetics as related to behavior. The basic physiological ways information is received from the external and internal environments through a variety of sensors and then processed by the hormonal / nervous system are described. Typical psychophysiological dysfunctions and interventions are also described. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PH 507A - Anatomy and Physiology for Psychophysiologists


    - Lecture This is a graduate level course in human anatomy and physiology as applied to behavioral medicine. Each basic structure and organ system is discussed with regard to both anatomical aspects and physiological functions as they change over time and in relation to both the external and internal environment. The nervous system is not emphasized as it is detailed in another course. Interactions between the complex web of hormonal feed-back loops and dysregulation of behavior, emotions, and drives is discussed in relation to implementation of behavioral interventions. Other areas emphasized are respiratory physiology, behavioral immunology, psychophysiology of pain, interactions between pain, stress, and muscle tension, pathophysiology of headache, cardiovascular disease and hypertension, and basic kinesiological concepts. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PH 507B - Anatomy and Physiology Lab.


    It is crucial to have a laboratory in addition to the lecture course as the lecture course simply cannot provide students with the hands on experience required of psychophysiologists to understand (a) the complex but incredibly tiny and fragile connections between the parts of the mammalian brain, (b) the structures of major parts of the brain which limit their functions, and (c) the requirement for very exact placement of muscle sensors to avoid picking up spurious signals. It requires actual hands-on experience with physical relationships between muscle locations to realize where signals recorded from a muscle of primary interest originate. As important, it is crucial to understand why some muscles are located in such a way that they cannot be recorded from the surface. The in-person portion of the laboratory is about 4 hours of dissection of a sheep brain and guinea pig muscles. The 11 hour web based portion consists of watching videos of dissections to prepare for the hands on work, performing virtual dissections, and watching dissections of human cadavers. 1 credit(s)
  
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    PH 507C - Anatomy and Physiology for Psychophysiologists - Lab


    It is crucial to have a laboratory in addition to the lecture course as the lecture course simply cannot provide students with the hands on experience required of psychophysiologists to understand (a) the complex but incredibly tiny and fragile connections between the parts of the mammalian brain, (b) the structures of major parts of the brain which limit their functions, and (c) the requirement for very exact placement of muscle sensors to avoid picking up spurious signals. It requires actual hands-on experience with physical relationships between muscle locations to actually realize where signals recorded from a muscle of primary interest originate. As important, it is crucial to understand why some muscles are located in such a way that they cannot be recorded from the surface. The in-person portion of the laboratory is about 4 hours of dissection of a sheep brain and guinea pig muscles. The 11 hour web based portion consists of watching videos of dissections to prepare for the hands on work, performing virtual dissections, and watching dissections of human cadavers. 1.0 credits.
      0 credit(s)
  
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    PH 510A - Psychophysiological Recording and Intervention / General Biofeedback Lecture


    This course provides a basic understanding of the physiology and methodology underlying common psychophysiological recording techniques used in behavioral medicine including surface electromyography, electroencephalography, respiration, blood pressure, pulse rate, skin temperature, and electrodermal responses. Sufficient knowledge about how common psychophysiological recording and biofeedback instruments function and are used is provided so students can incorporate psychophysiological aspects of assessment into their normal practices. This course also teaches the principles and applications of biofeedback as used in educational and clinical settings. It does not emphasize electroencephalographic (EEG) biofeedback as this is covered in a separate course. The strengths and weaknesses of evidence supporting the use of biofeedback for a variety of clinical disorders is reviewed and the techniques for actually doing biofeedback are detailed. Techniques for using biofeedback as a tool for shaping and conditioning responses to stress are emphasized. The laboratory portion of the courses provides sufficient hands on exposure to typical, clinical grade psychophysiological recording and biofeedback equipment and techniques that students will be able to recognize adequate and inadequate signals and be able to attach sensors to their patients appropriately so that good signals can be recorded. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PH 510B - Psychophysiological Recording and Intervention / General Biofeedback - Lab


    The general biofeedback laboratory gives students an opportunity to practice attaching sensors and using biofeedback techniques with other students. Techniques for using sEMG biofeedback and other psychophysiological techniques to correct problems including movement disorders, pelvic floor disorders, etc. are demonstrated and attempted. 0 credit(s)
  
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    PH 510C - Psychophysiological Assessment and Intervention


    This course provides a basic understanding of the physiology and methodology underlying common psychophysiological principles and applications as used in educational and clinical settings. The strengths and weaknesses of evidence supporting the use of biofeedback for a variety of clinical disorders is reviewed and the techniques for actually doing biofeedback are detailed. Techniques for using biofeedback as a tool for shaping and conditioning responses to stress are emphasized. The laboratory portion of the course provides sufficient hands practice with typical, clinical grade psychophysiological recording and biofeedback equipment and assessment and interventional techniques that students will be able to competently perform psychophysiological assessments interventions in their practices. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PH 510D - General Biofeedback Lab


    The general biofeedback laboratory gives students an opportunity to practice attaching sensors and using biofeedback techniques with other students. Techniques for using sEMG biofeedback and other psychophysiological techniques to correct problems including movement disorders, pelvic floor disorders, etc. are demonstrated and attempted. 0 credit(s)
  
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    PH 511 - Genetic Influences on Behavior


    This course explores the impact of genetics on human behavior in relation to the environment. Behavioral genetics addresses questions such as: “How do genes determine behavior? How much of behavior is nature versus nurture? How do behaviors evolve?” The course and its text provide “a range of examples, such as laboratory studies on flies and mice, field observations on species as diverse as butterflies and meerkats, as well as human behavioral disorders. Students will become familiar with “genetic principles with neurobiological and ecological perspectives so they learn how to find and map genes that affect behaviors. They will also learn how the coordinated expression of ensembles of these genes enables the nervous system to express complex behaviors in response to changes in the environment”. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    PH 512A - Psychophysiological Research Techniques


    This course covers the basic steps and time-line of a project, steps in formulating and maturing a question, research ethics, the protocol approval process, background and literature searches, and methods of determining a project’s feasibility and relevance. The logic and progression of study designs used to evaluate the efficacy of behavioral medicine studies is detailed and exemplified. Topics include single subject and single group designs - cohorts, multiple group designs, strengths and weaknesses of longitudinal and cross-sectional studies, prospective experimental vs. observational and retrospective designs. Students will learn how objective tests, surveys, and inventories are normalized in comparison with various groups, analyzed, and critiqued. The course also covers research protocol design, the consent form, and the protocol review process. This section covers subject selection techniques (sampling, inclusion - exclusion, etc.), kinds of data (dichotomous, nominal, ordinal, continuous, etc.), techniques for hardening subjective data, validity and reliability, survey and questionnaire design, as well as pilot studies and the initial power analysis - feasibility and resources. The statistics section is designed to teach students how to analyze typical study designs used in behavioral medicine. It includes qualitative and quantitative data reduction and analysis, descriptive statistics in clinical practice, inferential statistics - parametric and non-parametric, power analysis, pattern analysis, and analysis of outcome and quality of life studies. Students use standard data analysis software to analyze practice data sets so they become familiar with the use of these programs. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PH 512B - Research Experience


    Students are rarely proficient in the skills actually required to perform a research project at the level and complexity of a dissertation. This course gives students a chance to apply skills taught in the lecture portion of the research course including subject recruitment, data gathering, and data analysis to actual subjects by participating in a preapproved research study. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PH 512C - Statistical Evaluation in Psychophysiology


    Students are rarely proficient in the skills actually required to perform a research project at the level and complexity of a dissertation. This course gives students a chance to apply skills taught in the lecture portion of the research course including IRB approval, subject recruitment, data gathering, data analysis, and writing the paper based on the practice study. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PH 515 - Pain Assessment and Intervention from a Psychophysiological Perspective


    This course describes the underlying psychophysiology of pain and summarizes the strengths and weaknesses of evidence supporting the efficacy of self-regulatory interventions for prevention and reduction of various pain problems. Interactions between pain, stress, and muscle tension are emphasized. Extensive examples of how to perform psychophysiological interventions for various psychophysiologically maintained and magnified pain states are provided. The pathophysiology of migraine, tension, cluster, rebound, medication induced, and other types of headaches is reviewed. Current schema for differential diagnosis of the various types of headache are discussed in relation to interactions between behavioral medicine providers, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, neurologists, and other health care providers. The evidence supporting the efficacy of behavioral interventions for various types of headaches is reviewed. Detailed examples of patient education and training materials are provided along with typical behavioral training regimes and pathways. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PH 517 - Introduction to Behavioral and Alternative Medicine


    Complementary and alternative (C & A) practices are rapidly finding acceptance within the clinical community. Simultaneously, “accepted” practices are falling from favor as they are shown to be ineffective or even counterproductive. Patients now visit as many or more “alternative” providers as traditional providers and are spending billions of dollars on attempts to get care not available from the traditional medical community. This course is intended to provide students with a balanced overview of a selection of complementary and alternative medicine and behavioral medicine interventions recently and currently practiced in the “West”. It is also intended to help students learn to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the claims made by the proponents of these practices so they can more readily separate the real knowledge from the emotional advertising. The course provides students with practice in and techniques for objectively assessing the validity of claims presented in formats different than usually acceptable to current “Western” science. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    PH 518 - Hormonal and Perceptual Influences on Behavior


    Hormones have huge impacts of many aspects of our behavior ranging from instinctive sexual behaviors through identification of likely spouses, how we remember events, patterns of play, etc. Differences in our perceptual abilities result in our perceiving the world so differently that they influence many of our fears and believes about what is around us. This course explores the mechanisms through which hormones and perceptions lead to many of our most fundamental beliefs and the behaviors based on them. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    PH 520 - Principles and Theories of Stress Management and Relaxation / Imagery Training - Lecture


    This course provides the basic information on the principles and theories underlying the application of stress management techniques in a variety of settings including the workplace, schools, and clinical practice. The course provides a historical perspective on development of these practices and a comparative approach to their use among the world’s cultures. Methods for identification of stressors are emphasized. Practices reviewed include meditation, autogenic exercises, humor, progressive muscle relaxation training and many others. Evidence supporting the efficacy of these practices in preventing and correcting stress related problems is detailed. The indications, non-indications and contra-indications of relaxation therapies are discussed. The course then provides detailed instruction in how to perform these techniques including typical multi-session regimes, handout, etc. The laboratory gives students a chance to practice these techniques under supervision on each other. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    PH 520A - Principles and Theories of Stress Management and Relaxation / Imagery Training — Lecture


    This course provides the basic information on the principles and theories underlying the application of stress management techniques in a variety of settings including the workplace, schools, and clinical practice. The course provides a historical perspective on development of these practices and a comparative approach to their use among the world’s cultures. Methods for identification of stressors are emphasized. Practices reviewed include meditation, autogenic exercises, humor, progressive muscle relaxation training and many others. Evidence supporting the efficacy of these practices in preventing and correcting stress related problems is detailed. The indications, non-indications and contra-indications of relaxation therapies are discussed. The course then provides detailed instruction in how to perform these techniques including typical multi-session regimes, handout, etc. The laboratory gives students a chance to practice these techniques under supervision on each other. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    PH 520B - Principles and Theories of Stress Management and Relaxation / Imagery Training - Lab


    This course provides the basic information on the principles and theories underlying the application of stress management techniques in a variety of settings including the workplace, schools, and clinical practice. The course provides a historical perspective on development of these practices and a comparative approach to their use among the world’s cultures. Methods for identification of stressors are emphasized. Practices reviewed include meditation, autogenic exercises, humor, progressive muscle relaxation training and many others. Evidence supporting the efficacy of these practices in preventing and correcting stress related problems is detailed. The indications, non-indications and contra-indications of relaxation therapies are discussed. The course then provides detailed instruction in how to perform these techniques including typical multi-session regimes, handout, etc. The laboratory gives students a chance to practice these techniques under supervision on each other. 0 credit(s)
  
  •  

    PH 520B - Principles and Theories of Stress Management and Relaxation / Imagery Training - Lab


    This course provides the basic information on the principles and theories underlying the application of stress management techniques in a variety of settings including the workplace, schools, and clinical practice. The course provides a historical perspective on development of these practices and a comparative approach to their use among the world’s cultures. Methods for identification of stressors are emphasized. Practices reviewed include meditation, autogenic exercises, humor, progressive muscle relaxation training and many others. Evidence supporting the efficacy of these practices in preventing and correcting stress related problems is detailed. The indications, non-indications and contra-indications of relaxation therapies are discussed. The course then provides detailed instruction in how to perform these techniques including typical multi-session regimes, handout, etc. The laboratory gives students a chance to practice these techniques under supervision on each other. 0 credit(s)
  
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    PH 522A - Psychophysiological Entrainment and Stimulation - Lecture


    This course provides sufficient information on psychophysiological entrainment and stimulation for students to understand how various forms of physical stimulation are used to alter the brain and body’s functioning. Topics include (1) magnetic stimulation of the periphery to induce changes in peripheral blood flow, (2) magnetic stimulation of the brain to induce out of body experiences and control headaches, (3) physiological entrainment of breathing for control of hypertension, (4) Basics of arousal and dysarousal, (5) review of QEEG and HRV in relation to entrainment, (6) Physiology of AVE, (7) Standard Studies on AVE, (8) Cognitive Studies on AVE, (9) CES, (10) tDCS, (11) HRV - breath-work exercise, (12) Programming with the DAVID Session Editor, (13) use of “alphastim”-like devices to alter states of consciousness, and (14) neuromodulation including rTMS, etc. 2 credit(s)
  
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    PH 522B - Psychophysiological Entrainment and Stimulation - Lab


    The laboratory gives students the opportunity to experience the processes discussed in the lecture portion of the course and begin learning to apply several within the clinical and training environments. 1 credit(s)
  
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    PH 525 - Neuropsychophysiology (Nervous System Functions in Psychophysiology)


    The course covers central and peripheral nervous system anatomy and physiology and finishes with an emphasis on nervous system pathophysiology. The brain/spinal cord plexus is discussed from both anatomical and physiological perspectives concentrating on plasticity in response to changes in the external and internal environment as well as viewing the system as an interactive organ with hormonal, nerve based, and blood flow based feedback and control systems. Current theories of memory formation and change with time and emotions are emphasized, as are effects of emotions and the environment on brain function. Psychophysiological recording methodology including EEG and scans such as MEG and PET are examined in relation to their uses in behavioral medicine. Neurological disorders centered on the CNS (such as epilepsy) are discussed in relationship to psychophysiological evaluations and behavioral interventions. The anatomy and physiology of the autonomic and somatic branches of the peripheral nervous system are discussed to provide a basic understanding how the system works in relationship with the whole body’s function and health. Emphasis is on the ever-changing balance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic portions of the autonomic nervous system that alters functions of nerves, glands, and muscles which can be trained to achieve a balanced life. The impact of the somatic nervous system on perception and action is also emphasized. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PH 527A - EEG Biofeedback: Assessment and Intervention - Lecture


    This course teaches the principles of recording the brain’s electrical activities through EEG, as well as other imaging techniques, that pertain to applied to psychophysiological assessments and interventions. The basic psychophysiology of the EEG signal is reviewed in relationship to educational applications and disorders (such as epilepsy and ADHD) treated with EEG biofeedback. The strengths and weaknesses of evidence supporting the use of EEG biofeedback for a variety of clinical disorders is reviewed and the techniques for actually dong EEG biofeedback are detailed. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PH 527B - EEG Biofeedback: Assessment and Intervention - Lab


    This lab includes an 8-hour in-person demonstration and practicum at either the Saybrook RC or the AAPB annual meeting. The hands-on practicum is finding 10 20 sites based upon the 10 and 20% model and hooking up a client to perform 1 and 2 -channel EEG recordings for neurofeedback training purposes. It will guide you through observing and remediating biological artifact (such as eye blinks, saccades, glossokinetic activity, cardioballistic interference) during the recording as well as observing transients that may require further medical interpretation. The students will practice determining and setting up protocols as well as operantly shaping the learning through threshold and sustained-reward paradigms. Finally, reviewing the session results will be demonstrated. 0 credit(s)
  
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    PH 528 - Theoretical and Clinical Considerations in Advanced EEG Biofeedback Methodologies


    EEG Biofeedback has radically expanded over the past 10 years. As a result the list of treatment options can seem overwhelming. Amidst the clamor of competing ideologies, manufacturers and treatment modalities, it is the responsibility of the advanced EEG biofeedback clinician to create a treatment approach that is effective and engaging for the trainee/patient/client. This class moves beyond the introduction to basic EEG feedback modalities and equipment, and into an overview of the state of the art of EEG, and the subsequent options and complex treatment decisions that are necessary in operating competently in the modern Neurofeedback climate. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PH 530A - Behaviorally Oriented Techniques


    The course covers five main areas: (a) wellness and community / group psychophysiology, (b) operant and classical conditioning, (c) imagery, (d) cognitive restructuring, and (e) meditation techniques. Wellness programs for maintaining and increasing the health of individuals and of specific communities such as students in a class, older people in an assisted living community, workers in an office or factory are becoming increasingly popular. The evidence supporting the efficacy of these programs is reviewed and ways to optimize such programs, in light of this evidence, for different groups is discussed. Classical operant and instrumental conditioning are powerful tools which can be used to shape the behavior of individuals and groups in the work/school and clinical setting. The history of, supporting evidence for, and basic techniques for each type of conditioning are presented. The standard techniques of self-hypnosis, and imagery training are described and students are taught the elements of their application. Uses of these techniques with specific types of patients and integration of these techniques into other behavioral medicine interventions is discussed. The history, supporting efficacy studies, and basis for the major meditation techniques are described in relation to self-regulation. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PH 531C - Behaviorally Oriented Techniques Lab


    The laboratory gives students an opportunity to practice behavioral techniques learned in the lecture portion of the course on other students while being supervised. 0 credit(s)
  
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    PH 540 - Psychophysiological Assessment of Sleep Lecture


    This course covers the basic psychophysiology of sleep and sleep disorders as well as psychophysiological and other methods of assessing sleep. The basics of sleep cannot be understood without a firm understanding of biological rhythms so this topic will be covered as it relates to sleep. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PH 545A - Optimal Functioning: Psychophysiological Applications in the Community, School, Sports, and Workplace Lecture


    Effectively working within large organizations to increase work efficiency, decrease accidents, and increase morale while decreasing stress related absences, disorders, and conflicts is a complex task being requested by more and more employers as the impact of stress on the workforce become better recognized. Optimal performance in these environments is difficult but achievable with appropriate training. The research supporting the efficacy of such efforts is reviewed and the typical techniques for interventions with diverse groups are illustrated. A wide variety of behavioral interventions have been effective in enhancing and optimizing performance in many settings. Effects include increased endurance and accuracy under many circumstances - especially within sports and the military. The evidence supporting this assertion is reviewed and examples are provided of specific interventions shown to be effective in specific circumstances. Effective presentation of behavioral medicine concepts to diverse groups is a daunting task which requires considerable training and experience. Practices are frequently augmented through communicating with peers, other health care professionals and administrators, the public, and potential patients. Effective methods for presenting to each type of group are very different but have been well worked out. Typical presentation methods for workshops, lectures, and public appearances are presented which are likely to optimize understanding of behavioral medicine techniques. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PH 545B - Optimal Functioning: Psychophysiological Applications in the Community, School, Sports, and Workplace Practical Experience


    Students need to learn how to present the concepts and value of behavioral medicine techniques to a variety of audiences if they are going to be able to use their new skills in their clinical environments because patients need to be attracted to programs, other clinicians need to understand how behavioral medicine fits into clinical treatment programs, and administrators need to understand the economic and clinical value of the techniques. Once sufficient credits are accrued to have completed four quarters, each student must give at least two talks each to people representative of (1) the public, (2) clinicians, and (3) administrators before they can graduate. Talks are planned with the assistance of the student’s advisor and a brief outcome report of each talk must be approved by the advisor before credit for the talk can be given. 1 credit(s)
  
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    PH 550B - Clinical Hypnosis - Lab


    An in-person training session makes use of the theoretical knowledge taught in the lecture portion of the course to provide students with fundamental skills needed to induce a hypnotic state to make clinical use of the hypnotic condition in a variety of situations. 0 credit(s)
  
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    PH 555 - Biofeedback for Neuromuscular Reeducation


    This course teaches the elements of kinesiological movement science and how control of movement is distorted by different clinical conditions. The course includes the elements of (a) trigger point, (b) posture, and (c) motor control / coordination assessment. Methods for using psychophysiological recording techniques for assessment of movement related disorders and postural problems are illustrated. The impact of poor posture and improper sequencing of muscle motions as well as of improper levels of tension on development and sustainment of various pain problems such as tension headaches and low back pain are discussed. Techniques for using sEMG biofeedback and other psychophysiological techniques to correct these problems are illustrated. Issues of which techniques should be applied by which types of professionals given various training and scopes of practice are discussed. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PH 556A - Quantitative Electroencephalogram as an Assessment Tool for Brain-Based Disorders Lecture


    Quantitative electroencephalogram (QEEG) has become an important technique for psychophysiological assessment of brain-based disorders. This course covers reading and de-artifacting the EEG record, montages, database comparisons, drug effects on the EEG, frequency analysis, spectral and topographic aspects and basic neuroanatomy and physiology, based upon Brodmann areas and anatomical structures. 2 credit(s)
  
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    PH 556B - Quantitative Electroencephalogram as an Assessment Tool for Brain-Based Disorders - Lab.


    The laboratory permits students to apply information learned in the lecture portion of the course to develop the practical skills using QEEG equipment to properly attach sensors to subjects and practice standard recording techniques on each other. 1 credit(s)
  
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    PH 557 - Cardiorespiratory Psychophysiology Emphasizing Heart Rate Variability


    This course emphasizes (a) methods for evaluation and modification of breathing efficiency such as capnometry and (b) methods for evaluation and modification of autonomic quieting such as heart rate variability. Topics covered include (1) Cardiac anatomy and physiology, (2) Respiratory anatomy and physiology, (3) Autonomic nervous system anatomy and physiology, and (4) Heart rate variability psychophysiology, instrumentation, measurement, biofeedback strategies and applications. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PH 560 - Ethical, Legal, and Professional Standards in Applied Psychophysiology


    This course discusses ethical, legal, and professional standards issues in relationship to people from numerous fields adding psychophysiological interventions to their practices. Issues such as changes in scope of practice as well as limitations and guidelines set by governmental and professional organizations are discussed. The ethics of providing care for patients in the psychophysiological arena are discussed with special emphasis on use of unsubstantiated techniques into standard practice. The intent of this course is: To provide students with a basic understanding of both the role and function of ethical principles, legal issues, and professional behavior so they can apply that knowledge in their professional activities. To provide students with a strategy for resolving ethical dilemmas and for reducing risks for clients/patients and themselves. To provide students with practice in resolving potentially problematic situations via the use of case examples. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PH 565 - Pelvic Floor Disorders


    This course provides a basic understanding of pelvic floor functions and structures along with clinical etiologies of pelvic floor disorders treated by behavioral interventions. Urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence, and muscle tension related pelvic floor and vaginal pain are emphasized. Sufficient information on research supporting behavioral interventions, clinical protocols for behavioral interventions, and sufficient simulated demonstrations are presented to bring health care providers to the point where they have the knowledge base needed to provide these interventions to their clients, within their scopes of practice and expertise, after the providers gain hands-on experience by working with experienced practitioners. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PH 570 - Clinical Practicum and Field Experience


    Students identify a clinical or applied site or sites which will provide practice opportunities for two or more of the skill areas accrued as part of their PhD degree.  Students may not select a practicum which only provides experience in areas the students are already certified or in which they have already established proficiency. Students may choose up to three settings, in which they will accrue a minimum of 90 practice hours.  Students are responsible for making financial and administrative arrangements with the director of each clinical setting. The staff of the setting is responsible for supervising the student’s clinical work at that setting and must agree to send the Saybrook University practicum instructor a detailed report of the student’s experience, number of hours spent at the site, and success at the end of the rotation.  The practicum instructor meets weekly in a videoconference with students currently in practicum settings and reviews practice experiences and skills utilized by the students in the practicum setting. A learning contract and specific learning objectives for each site are developed conjointly with the student, the Saybrook practicum instructor, and the supervising professional responsible at the clinical site. The learning contract for each site must be approved in writing by the PhD Psychology, Psychophysiology Specialization Director before work can begin at that site. 4 credit(s)
  
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    PH 574 - Psychophysiology Seminar


    The psychophysiology seminar is a collection of components which combine to potentiate, personalize, and enhance students experience in psychophysiology. It is specifically designed to bridge the gap between distance based courses and personal interactions between students and between students and faculty which would be found at an in-person program. Students participate in the class throughout their attendance at Saybrook. The seminar has five main components: orientation to psychophysiology, speaker series, interest group meetings, individual student mentoring, specialization community group. 0 credit(s)
  
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    PH 575 - Professional Development Planning Seminars


    Students who have not yet established a clear career path need to plan how to integrate newly acquired psychophysiological skills into one’s professional life is critical to insuring that the program is worth pursuing. Students participate in Professional Development Seminars given approximately monthly spread across the program’s first year to aid in preparing a business plan which will be ready to be put into effect by the time the program has been completed. The plan is intended to be a guideline for application of psychophysiological skills in each student’s unique setting, be it private practice, an institutional setting or any other system or combination. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PH 577 - Case Seminars


    Students meet by conference call about once per month for an hour and a half to discuss psychophysiologically oriented cases they have worked with. The discussion is facilitated by the course instructor(s). Students are expected to comment on each other’s cases. Students scheduled to present at a particular meeting must e-mail brief case summaries of each case to be presented to the instructor(s) and other students at least a week in advance. These discussions are intended to guide students toward an understanding of how to incorporate psychophysiological assessment and interventional techniques into their usual approaches to patient care and to provide a bridge between the theoretical material presented during the lecture courses and the realities of modern clinical, educational, and coaching applications. The instructors are BCIA certified (Biofeedback Certification Institute of America certified) in general biofeedback, pelvic floor muscle disorders, and neurofeedback. They will use the seminar to mentor students through sufficient cases so that each student meets the BCIA requirements for mentoring in any of the above specialties in which the student wishes to be certified. Three credits spread across the second year of the program. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PH 8950 - Certificate Integrative Seminar


    The final part of the Certificate program is the integrative paper. The purpose of the integrative paper is to give the learner an opportunity to draw together the most important aspects of the Certificate courses, to assess strengths and identify further learning needs, and to develop a specific plan for continuing personal and professional work. Prerequisite(s): Open only to students pursuing a Psychophysiology certificate. 1 credit(s)

Psychology

  
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    CSIH 3220 - The African Diaspora: African American Cultural History and Psychology


    This first in a sequence of courses on the African Diaspora will focus on the definition, constituents, and historiography of the African Diaspora and greater comprehension of the cultural history and psychology of persons with African ancestry, through the lens of African and African-American psychology. Selected texts for the course have been written by African, African-Caribbean, and African-American scholars. The methodological approach to the study of the African Diaspora is interdisciplinary and draws to the foreground historiography, depth psychology, economics of capitalism, law, mythology, religion, art history, and anthropology for construction of an ancestral ethno-cultural narrative of the African Diaspora against the background of world cultural history. The course content and approach should open and cultivate, through critical thinking, a worldview and means to deconstruct, analyze, comprehend, and reconstruct complex sets of human relations in the African Diaspora from global, regional, national, and personal perspectives. It should allow us to see how the archetype of culture is actualized within institutions, living micro-systems, and psychodynamics of the Diaspora. The specific focus of this course is on African-American cultural history, psychology, and experience from origins in Africa, the Middle Passage, bondage, civil and psychological reconstruction, the Civil Rights movement, Pan-Africanism, and Negritude in America, Europe, the Caribbean, and Africa, Affirmative Action, African-American family life, demographics, health/mental health, illness, spirituality, resilience, and optimal development. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY XXX - Clinical Intervention III


    3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 1011 - Psychotherapy Proseminar: Humanistic Psychology


    This proseminar provides an introduction to a range of humanistically-oriented perspectives for students to begin to develop an awareness of their own evolving professional identities in terms of their stances and beliefs about psychotherapy, psychopathology, and professional practice. 0 credits 0 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 1080 - History and Systems of Psychology


    The objective of this course is to give the student an overview of the history of modern psychology in three streams in order to place more accurately the existential-humanistic and transpersonal movements in their proper context. The student will be expected to gain proficiency in the major events and personalities associated with each of the three streams, which include: 1) experimental psychology in the universities (i.e., the history of psychophysics, behaviorism, and cognitive psychology); 2) clinical psychology as both an academic and applied field (i.e., the history of largely depth-psychology, with an emphasis on the histories of Freud, Jung, Adler, and Erikson); and 3) existential-humanistic and transpersonal psychology, exemplified by the life and work of Carl Rogers, Abraham Maslow, and Rollo May. Cross listed as EHP 1080 - History and Systems of Psychology . Prerequisite(s): PSY 6030  for Clinical Psychology students. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 1500A - Foundations and Critique of Contemporary Psychology - Part I


    The purpose of this course is to provide a solid underpinning in the foundational topics in the field of contemporary psychology. The course will cover mainstream perspectives and humanistic perspectives on the foundational themes addressed in contemporary psychology. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 1500B - Foundations and Critique of Contemporary Psychology - Part II


    This is the second required course for doctoral students; to be taken consecutively following Part I. The purpose of this course is to provide a solid underpinning in the foundational topics in the field of contemporary psychology. The course will cover mainstream perspectives and humanistic perspectives on the foundational themes addressed in contemporary psychology. Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of PSY 1500A . 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 2025 - Systems of Psychotherapy


    This course explores four broad categories into which the types of therapy fall: a) psychodynamic; b) behavioral and cognitive-behavioral; c) existential, humanistic, and transpersonal; and d) family systems approaches. The course surveys the history and development of each school and its views on human nature, psychological health, normal development, psychopathology, and approaches to intervention. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 2040 - Existential Psychotherapies


    The existential psychotherapist works with fundamental existential themes of human existence: death and freedom, choice and responsibility, isolation, relatedness, and meaning and mystery. These themes organize the basic structures with which human life is shaped and experienced, and therefore provide the context for an existential psychotherapy. This existential psychotherapy course explores clinical applications of existential theory to the human situation in individual and group therapy. As an introduction to existential psychotherapies, this course is in three parts: Part I (theory) lays out the historical and philosophical traditions that underlie existential psychotherapeutic practice; Part II (therapy) shows how existential therapy grows out of existential theory; and Part III (application) uses the case study method to consider how existential psychotherapy can be applied to a diverse set of problems and clientele. Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. Cross-listed as EHP 2040 - Existential Psychotherapies . 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 2047 - Existential Psychotherapies III: James Bugental and the Existential-Humanistic Tradition


    This course will be of interest to students who want to explore existential-humanistic psychotherapy as understood by James Bugental, one of psychology’s most respected and talented practitioners. Bugental held that life’s existential contingencies could often overwhelm causing a loss of centeredness, agency, and self-directedness. By focusing in the here-and-now, Bugental intended to promote inner presence, agency, and responsibility assumption in a client. Bugental’s experiential approach is both powerful and effective-and is rarely found in traditional therapies. Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. Cross-listed as EHP 2047 - Existential Psychotherapies III: James Bugental and the Existential-Humanistic Tradition . 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 2050 - Psychopathology and Diagnosis


    This course provides a critical overview of theory, research and processes that have evolved into modern Western thinking about psychopathology. Attention is initially given to current diagnostic criteria and the utility of the DSM, as well as the biological, behavioral, sociocultural and intra-psychic determinant patterns of functional and dysfunctional human behavior. Students are encouraged to think broadly and dialectically about optimal development and pathology, in systems of personality and systems of modern Western cultural institutions. This course then introduces students to humanistic critiques of the current dominant DSM-based model of psychological difficulty, and presents a critical evaluation of mainstream notions of psychopathology and its treatment. Positive, nonpathology-focused or strengths-based ways of viewing psychological problems and their remediation are considered, including evidence supporting the humanistic focus on a positive relationship as curative, even with disorders such as schizophrenia. The goals of the course for students are twofold: a) to provide them with a strong foundation in the current medical establishment’s views of and communications about psychopathology, and b) to make them aware of alternatives which place primary emphasis on the healing power of relationships, on treating people as whole persons, and on focusing on the positive in humans.  Note: This course is open to CP students only. Prerequisite(s): PSY 6030   3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 2060 - Human Sexuality


    This course presents an investigation of sexuality within the larger context of the human experience. Emphasis is placed on the study of human sexual development, dimensions of sexual behavior, sex education, health issues, sex therapy, ethical and legal aspects of sexuality and sex therapy, and art and sexuality. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 2505 - Clinical Psychopharmacology


    Students develop foundational understanding in psychopharmacology important to client-oriented clinical practice in psychotherapy and counseling. Students develop skills in forming a collaborative team with the client and the prescribing health professional. The course surveys fundamental diagnoses that may be accompanied by psychotropic medications and methods to help clients monitor medication effectiveness. The course emphasizes psychoactive medications within a biopsychosocial understanding of the client. The course surveys the interface of psychoactive medications in the practice of psychotherapy and counseling. Prerequisite(s): PSY 2050  and PSY 3025   3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 3015 - Cognition & Affect in Human Behavior


    This course explores major theories, concepts, and current research in cognitive and affective bases of behavior, including information processing and learning, internal representational models, developmental influences, and relationships between cognition and emotion. Cognitive and affective experience and representation are addressed including conscious and unconscious, visual (including visual imagery), auditory (including inner speech), procedural (in complex skills like speaking), declarative (involving propositions about the world), and emotional processing. Individual differences and cultural factors influencing cognitive processes and affective expression are presented. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 3025 - Biological Bases of Behavior


    This course is an exploration of biological bases of behavior with special emphasis on clinical examples. This course addresses questions of how the human brain and nervous system produce our range of behaviors: sensation, emotions, sleep and dreams, reproductive behavior, language, and memory. Beginning with the basic structure and function of the nervous system, we move to explore the organic bases of behavior exploring how endocrine, immune, and nervous systems contribute to homeostasis, health, and disease. Clinical examples include depression, schizophrenia, eating disorders, sleep disorders, aggression, dyslexia, and amnesias. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 3045A - Clinical Intervention I


    This course is the first required course in a sequence (Interventions I - IV) for clinical psychology students and it is launched at a Saybrook Residential Conference (attendance required).  In this course, students begin advanced study of integrative humanistic psychotherapeutic interventions from three existential-humanistic perspectives: emotion-focused therapy, person-centered therapy, and existential therapy. Motivational Interviewing is also briefly considered. Research on existential-humanistic approaches is surveyed. The focus of this course is on the development of clinical and therapy skills, including 1) understanding of the client as the active agent of change in the therapeutic process and the therapeutic relationship, 2) understanding the therapists role in creating a safe therapeutic environment that includes empathy, genuineness, active listening, responsiveness, and positive regard for the client, and 3) skills necessary for working with a variety of client issues with sensitivity to the complexity of human diversity and the importance of multicultural competency in clinical practiceNote: This course is open to CP students only. Prerequisite(s): PSY 2025 ; PSY 2050 ; PSY 6020  and PSY 6060   3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 3045B - Clinical Intervention II


    This course is the second required in a sequence (Interventions I - IV) for clinical psychology students and it is launched at a Saybrook Residential Conference (attendance required). In this course, students will continue further overview and development of intervention techniques and therapy skills as relevant to different modalities and populations: children, adolescents, adults, couples, families, groups, and communities. The course will focus on the therapist’s role in selecting and implementing intervention strategies and monitoring progress, collaborative treatments, and skills necessary for working with a variety of client issues across the lifespan with sensitivity to the complexities of human diversity and the importance of multicultural competencies in clinical practice. Note: This course is open to CP students only.  Prerequisite(s): Masters in Clinical Psychology or comparable degree (see Program Chair), PSY 3045A   3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 3055 - Supervision in Clinical Psychology


    Clinical supervision is a necessary aspect of training for clinicians. Through supervision, a clinician-in-training gains necessary clinical competencies in order to ensure that trainees’ clients receive effective and ethical service. This course critically examines methods, relationships, ethics, multiculturalism, and evaluative processes of clinical supervision. Special focus is given to establishing a meaningful supervisor/supervisee relationship. While students will learn about different theoretical orientations that may inform their supervisory experience, they will be encouraged to consider their role in these relationships from a humanistic standpoint that will foster growth in the supervisor, supervisee, and their clients.  They will be asked to explore ways of navigating and growing from supervisory relationships that may be challenging or uncomfortable.  In addition, students will be encouraged to reflect on their current progress, as well as goals in their own development as clinicians. Though open to all students, this course satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. Note: This course is open to CP students only. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Spring term.
  
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    PSY 3056 - Group Therapy


    This clinical course examines philosophies and models of group counseling and psychotherapy. The course has four fundamental goals. The first is a critical analysis of contemporary theories and models of group counseling and psychotherapy. The second is to be able to identify the theories and therapeutic group approaches that best fit the context and nature of the clinical requirements and are congruent with the personality and values of the student and clients. A third goal is developing sensitivity to the many ways in which one’s values and beliefs impact one’s choice of interventions. A fourth goal is to encourage reflection regarding how the insights of different approaches to may be applied in a group context within a humanistic framework.  Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. Check with Instructor or Program Director to learn more about residential component to course. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 3057 - Introduction to Family Therapy


    This clinical course provides an introductory overview to the traditional and contemporary school of family therapy.  Participants will critically review and consider various conceptualizations and approaches in the practice of family therapy, with particular attention to diverse family structures and settings. The course emphasizes case description, historical and developmental perspectives, theoretical models in systems formulations, and integration of cultural and social structures in contextual dynamics. Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 3058 - Child & Adolescent Treatment within Context


    This clinical course is intended to afford learners an opportunity for advanced studies pertaining to the treatment of children and adolescents, including but not limited to, a) considerations in child/adolescent therapy, b) treatment of special populations, and c) comprehension from research to practice. The course considers developmental processes, treatment in context such as diverse systems like residential, foster care, school, healthcare, etc. There will be specific attention to considerations of multiculturalism and integrative treatment planning. Building upon and drawing from the fundamental principles for psychotherapeutic practice from a humanistic point of view, developed by the Task Force of the Humanistic Psychology Division of the American Psychological Association (Division 32 Task Force, 2001), learners will not only critique mainstream treatment approaches but strengthen clinical conceptualization for the integration of evidence-based and practice-based approaches within a humanistic stance. Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites.  3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 3059 - Child Abuse Assessment and Reporting


    This in-residence course provides a complete overview of the California Child Abuse Reporting Law for psychologists and provides students with clinical skills in recognizing signs of the possible child physical, emotional, and sexual abuse or neglect. Upon completion of the course, students will also understand when and how to talk to parents or other caregivers about referring them to proper authorities for suspected neglect or abuse; and when, how, and to whom to report suspected child neglect or abuse in their role as mandated reporters. This course meets the 7 contact hours of training in Child Abuse Assessment and Reporting required for psychology licensure in California. . It also meets that need for most states as a licensure requirement in most US jurisdictions; adaptations are possible in consultation with the instructor. 7 Contact Hours; 0 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 3060 - Foundations of First Responder Psychology


    This course will critically examines the general psychological aspects of police, fire, and emergency medical services responders including: dimensions of personality shared among emergency responders, organizational impacts on first responders, work-related impacts on family relationships, and issues of diversity and individual differences. Participants will assess theoretical models of emergency and crisis decision-making, as well as identify how stress, anxiety, and trauma impact first responders and their families. Exploration of current research on positive coping strategies, professional and peer psychological interventions, as well as resilience-building skills for first responders, and their relationship with improved job performance and efficacy, will be highlighted. Examines reality-based training simulations involving stress inoculation theory, stress management and arousal control methods useful in the field for performance an increased psychological resiliency with associated methods of evaluating these experience’s effects on responders. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 3061 - Community Issues and the First Responder


    This course will introduce an emergency response approach to understanding hazards and disasters that is grounded in social responsibility and multicultural theory. Participants will examines historical, social, geographical, and other relevant factors that put different communities and individuals at risk in different ways. Factors in disaster-resilient communities will be identified, and vulnerability analyses will be learned to help develop individualized community-based emergency response plans. Learners will also assess how marginalized social groups are affected by and cope with hazardous conditions and events, and strategies for community-based mitigation engaging those most at risk, will also be examined. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 3062 - First Responders as Servant/Leaders: Building Relationships


    This course will critically examine the first responder’s desire to serve the community, including the theoretical constructs and characteristics of the philosophy of servant leadership and social justice. Discussions of the role that social power plays in Public Safety Organizations, and the communities they serve, will be highlighted. Key factors in developing positive relationships and open communications between individuals within public safety organizations, as well as between first responders and the citizens and communities they serve, will be identified. Examines the issues of identifying and responding to toxic leadership and how response organizations can work to mitigate it from among their ranks. Commonly used leadership evaluation and assessment methods will be compared and evaluated for their use in leadership consultations and applications. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 3063 - First Responder Practicum Experience


    The 150 hour practicum experience will give students the opportunity to observe first responders in the everyday situations they encounter, and the culture of the organizations that they work. In conjunction with a Saybrook instructor and the practicum site liaison, students will tailor their practicum experience to their previous experiences, as well as their future professional goals. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 3070 - Meaning Centered Counseling and Therapy


    This course provides an introduction to logotherapy and meaning therapy (MT). With meaning as its central organizing construct, MT is an integrative, person-centered, positively oriented therapy. It is a very flexible and comprehensive approach, because it can be tailor-made to meet individual needs and is capable of integrating diverse therapeutic modalities, such as CBT and existential-phenomenological therapy. Building on the philosophical foundation of logotherapy, this course will introduce the four major meaning-centered intervention strategies: 1) PURE (Purpose, Understanding, Responsibility, and Enjoyment), 2) ABCDE (Acceptance, Belief, Commitment, Discovery, and Evaluation), 3) Dual-systems (integrating approach and avoidance systems), and 4) Double-vision (seeing both the immediate situation and the big picture).  In addition, the course will demonstrate the use of such meaning-centered interventions skills as attribution retraining, re-appraisal, value-clarification (identifying core values, beliefs & ultimate concerns), reflecting on self-identify (the real self vs. the ideal self), guided life review, and practicing the meaning mindset. The meaning mindset is a particularly powerful tool, because it can enhance clients’ motivation for meaningful living simply by their learning to see the meaning potential for significance in every situation, no matter how trivial.  In sum, it teaches students how to make the best of people’s meaning-seeking and meaning-making capacities to facilitate healing and flourishing. It enhances well-being, resilience, and personal growth thorough the path of meaning. This course will teach students how to identify the challenges and opportunities of addressing clients’ deeper issues of meaning, whatever their presenting problems.  One final caveat: any therapist can make good use of the meaning therapy intervention tools, but to be fully effective, the therapist needs to embrace (1) the philosophical assumption of logotherapy that life has inherent meaning, and (2) the assumption of humanistic psychology that to be fully human, people need to develop their growth potential. Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 3080 - C. G. Jung: His Life, Work, and Contemporary Perspectives in Analytical Psychology


    The course offers an overview of the life and times of Carl Gustav Jung, in cultural context from 1875 to 1961, through autobiography and recent critical biography. It provides an introduction to the core constructs of his theories of personality, psychoanalysis and psychotherapy, and post-Jungian extensions and critiques of his work in Analytical psychology that include areas of neuroscience, attachment theory, spirituality, and cultural complex theories. The course is offered to all students interested in the life and work of C.G. Jung across degree programs and Schools. It provides a strong theoretical foundation that supports and facilitates cohesive assimilation of aspects of his theories and work found in other courses offered at Saybrook. The course serves as a bridge to the in-depth study of Jung’s classical work, the Collected Works of C.G. Jung, and the recently published Red Book. This latter work provides foreground and the background for Jung’s original work, born from his creative and critical self-analysis. The course can serve as a portal to research, theory application, and professional practice in cross-cultural and multicultural psychology.  Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. Cross-listed as EHTP 3080. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 3171 - Perspectives and Foundations of Traumatic Stress


    Students are given an introduction to the historical and foundational aspects of trauma and complex trauma, how they are conceptualized, and their impact on a person’s psychological, social, physical and spiritual wellbeing. Specific impacts of traumatic stress at different points in the lifespan will be explored. Current psychological, alternative/complementary, and biomedical perspectives on trauma are integrated into this richly packed journey of knowledge. Multicultural factors will be incorporated throughout the different course topics. The central role of grief in trauma-due to the physical, psychological and/or social loss of a loved one or key aspects of one’s identity or memories-will be highlighted. This course is required for the Complex Trauma & the Healing Process Certificate. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 3172 - Trauma: Mind, Body, and Spiritual Dynamics


    The focus upon the mind-body connection in the understanding and achievement of well-being is an approach spanning thousands of years in contemplative practices and ancient traditions. In this course, students evaluate and engage in an exploration of the theory and effects of trauma within the mind and body. Spiritual dynamics involved in traumatic stress, as well as implications for psychospiritual growth, when affected by traumatic stress are explored. This course is required for the Complex Trauma & the Healing Process Certificate. Prerequisite(s): PSY 3171   3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 3176 - Trauma Assessment and Treatment in Practice


    Students will investigate how to assess different trauma states through both symptomatological and experiential sources. Medical diagnostic categories, such as trauma, stress and dissociative disorders, will be critically reviewed. Alternative approaches to classifying trauma experiences will be highlighted. Standardized measures of trauma assessment, with consideration placed upon important multicultural factors, will also be explored. Both common and alternative/complementary approaches to treating trauma will be identified. Risk management issues for practitioners are examined, as well as self-care techniques used to mitigate these risks. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 3177 - Traumatic Stress within Cultures and Self


    This class will explore traumatic stress as experienced and understood across different multicultural identities, including race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality/attractionality, class, disabilities and religion. Historical traumas (psychological injuries experienced by cultures over extended periods of time) and their contemporary impacts on contemporary society will be reviewed. Group and individual-level resiliency and growth strategies in response to these chronic stressors will be identified. The course will also examine how a practitioner’s own general multicultural competence and awareness of historical traumas-recent and distant-can impact clinical interventions and outcomes. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 3178 - The Psychology of Trauma in Working with First Responders


    This course examines the various traumas and psychological challenges faced by first responders; specifically, police, fire, and emergency medical services (EMS). The salient issues critical to comprehending, conceptualizing, preventing, and treating trauma and other psychological challenges that emerge for these special populations will be examined. First responders typically utilize formal and informal helping methods to address psychological distress and trauma. Thus, students will be exposed to these common methods of helping/coping utilized by fire, EMS and police, as well as critically review barriers to seeking help and creative solutions. Exploration of current research on positive coping strategies, professional and peer psychological interventions, as well as resilience-building skills for first responders, and their relationship to improving job performance and efficacy will be highlighted. This exploration will occur within the context of how historical and cultural professional factors, organizational dimensions, and individual experiences with trauma may both exacerbate and assist first responders in addressing psychological consequences of one-the-job stressors. Critical clinical and treatment implications will be highlighted during this exploration. This course is an elective for the Complex Trauma & the Healing Process Certificate. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 3179 - Traumatic Experiences in Relationships


    In this course, students will expand their conceptualization of trauma to include the multidimensional consequences of relational trauma for individuals’ wellbeing and implications for treatment. Assaultive relational traumas occur in various contexts such as: the family, workplace, school settings, neighborhoods, military, or college campuses.  Each of these settings contain a unique set of characteristics in which relational trauma is experienced by an individual. These unique characteristics, along with the associated clinical presentations, treatment, and legal considerations will also be explored. The course will also focus on the most common forms of traumas that occur in relationships: interpersonal violence such as domestic violence, incest, sexual and physical abuse, as well as psychological abuse and neglect. It will critically review how relational trauma across the lifespan can impact a person’s sense of self, relationship with her or his body, and with other people. Building upon humanistic principles, key concepts like posttraumatic growth, resiliency, and healing narratives will be considered. This course is an elective for the Complex Trauma & the Healing Process Certificate. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 3220 - The African Diaspora: African American Cultural History and Psychology


    This first in a sequence of courses on the African Diaspora will focus on the definition, constituents, and historiography of the African Diaspora and greater comprehension of the cultural history and psychology of persons with African ancestry, through the lens of African and African-American psychology. Selected texts for the course have been written by African, African-Caribbean, and African-American scholars. The methodological approach to the study of the African Diaspora is interdisciplinary and draws to the foreground historiography, depth psychology, economics of capitalism, law, mythology, religion, art history, and anthropology for construction of an ancestral ethno-cultural narrative of the African Diaspora against the background of world cultural history. The course content and approach should open and cultivate, through critical thinking, a worldview and means to deconstruct, analyze, comprehend, and reconstruct complex sets of human relations in the African Diaspora from global, regional, national, and personal perspectives. It should allow us to see how the archetype of culture is actualized within institutions, living micro-systems, and psychodynamics of the Diaspora. The specific focus of this course is on African-American cultural history, psychology, and experience from origins in Africa, the Middle Passage, bondage, civil and psychological reconstruction, the Civil Rights movement, Pan-Africanism, and Negritude in America, Europe, the Caribbean, and Africa, Affirmative Action, African-American family life, demographics, health/mental health, illness, spirituality, resilience, and optimal development. Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. Cross-listed as EHTP 3220, TSC 3220. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 3500 - Humanistic Psychology and Psychotherapy


    This course is intended to provide an introduction to and overview of humanistic psychology, including its origins and tributaries, its historical interrelations with Saybrook, and the possibilities that inhere for its future evolution and significance. We will consider, especially, humanistic psychology’s spheres of influence in the arena of psychotherapy but also in education and upon culture considered more broadly. Humanistic psychology’s critiques of alternate perspectives will be taken up, no less than those that have been leveled at humanistic psychology itself. The course will include an introduction to the writings of a triumvirate of founding parents - Carl Rogers, Abraham Maslow, and Rollo May - as well a consideration of their precursors and the ongoing work of simpatico voices in sister disciplines: Maya Angelou in literature, for example, and Robert Coles in psychiatry. One or two films resonant with core humanistic values/themes will also be included, as will John Coltrane’s sublime 1964 jazz recording, A Love Supreme. The impulse that informs humanistic psychology speaks in various voices. We shall take time in this course to savor its several expressions and callings. Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. Cross-listed as EHTP 3500. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 3510 - Transpersonal Psychology and Psychotherapy


    Transpersonal Psychology and Psychotherapy investigates human experiences that transcend the ordinary, particularly spiritual experiences and altered states of consciousness. This course reviews the Western roots of transpersonal psychology in the works of William James, Carl Jung, and Abraham Maslow. It also examines the relationship of transpersonal psychology to spiritual traditions, including shamanism, Buddhism, and Hinduism, as well as mythology and other forms of spiritual investigations. Transpersonal clinical approaches in therapy and research methods are also addressed. Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. Cross-listed as EHTP 3510. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 4000 - Comprehensive Exam


    Broadly, this exam affords the student the opportunity to demonstrate skills and knowledge related to clinical conceptualization, theory, research, and ethics, as well as competency in practice and cultural sensitivity. It also affords students self-assessment opportunities in reflecting upon their training and development as a clinical psychologist. The instructor serves as a coach during the semester, prompting activities for students to draw upon previous course learning experiences and clinical training in exam preparation.  The exam is administered in the first half of the term and is reviewed by a panel of faculty, allowing the department to review the student’s progression as a clinical psychologist. Satisfaction of the Comprehensive Exam is required in order for the student to proceed with the advanced program requirements of the dissertation, internship, and other degree requirements. Pre-requisite: Satisfactory completion of all core degree requirement courses. Note: This course is open to CP students only. 1 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 4050 - Integrative Health Psychology: The Application of Psychological Concepts and Tools to Health


    The subject matter of health psychology as a discipline overlaps greatly with the fields of integrative health and mind-body medicine. In the broadest sense, health psychology is the organized and systematic effort to apply the knowledge and skills of the behavioral sciences to human health and illness. This course introduces health psychology as an application of psychological principles and skills to health care. It presents the framework, methodology, and applications of mainstream health psychology, and reviews common applications of health psychology, such as increasing patient compliance with well-lifestyle changes, and mind-body interventions to reduce irritable bowel or asthma symptoms. The course introduces basic skill sets in health psychology, such as brief dynamic psychotherapy, humanistic psychotherapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, health coaching, relaxation and meditation techniques, imagery therapy, biofeedback and applied psychophysiology, and hypnosis. Finally, it introduces divergent approaches to health psychology including optimal health and wellness programs, humanistic and existential psychology, energy psychology, and transpersonal/spiritual approaches. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 4530 - Psychology, Religion, and Spirituality in Their Cultural Contexts


    This course provides an overview of the ways that religion and spirituality interact with psychology with special attention to the cultural context. This includes an exploration of various models for how religion and spirituality can relate to science and, in particular, psychology. Various models for psychology of religion and spirituality are considered, as well as models for integrating religion and spirituality with psychology. Psychology historically has had a complex relationship with religion, spirituality, and culture. The primary purpose of this course is to explore various models for the interrelationships of psychology, religion, and spirituality with special consideration given to the cultural influences upon these relationships. Consideration will be given to these domains (psychology, religion, spirituality, and culture) separately as well as from an integrated perspective. The course begins with an overview of definitions and exploration of epistemological issues relevant to how science and psychology can relate to religion and spirituality. The next section of the course explores various models for the psychology of religion, followed by a section on models for integrating psychology with religion and/or spirituality. The concluding sections of the course devote attention to the cultural contexts for the relationships between psychology, religion, and spirituality as well as consideration to applications of the psychology of religion and the integration of psychology with religion and spirituality. Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites.  Cross-listed as CSIH 4530. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 4535 - The Use of Poetry with Death, Loss, and Life Transition


    The creative arts are often used to assist people facing death, loss, and other important life transitions. Similarly, these life events often cause individuals to reflect upon the meaning in their life and seek to create new meaning, which can be aided by poetry and the creative arts. This course focuses on the use of poetry when encountering death, loss, and life transitions. Students are encouraged to reflect upon their own use of creativity in times of difficult life transitions. Additionally, students will explore ways to facilitate the use of poetry with others facing life transitions. Poems from various cultural backgrounds are considered.  Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. Cross-listed as CS 4535 and EHP 4535 - The Use of Poetry with Death, Loss, and Life Transition . 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 6010 - The Psychology of Multiculturalism in North America


    Focusing on the psychological aspects of living in a multicultural society, this course acquaints students with the variety of cultural traditions within the United States. Topics covered in Psychology of Multiculturalism include the examination of the psychological implications of being a member of a minority group, understanding the impact of ethno-cultural values upon thought and behavior, questions about the universality of the human experience and the origins of personality, and theoretical statements about multiculturalism and the balancing of conflicting and sometimes competing interests in society. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 6020 - Developmental Psychology


    The processes and significant transition points for child, adolescent, and adult development are considered in this class. Classic and contemporary theories of development through lifespan, including some modern western perspectives, are contrasted by examining their principal concepts and uncovering their assumptions about what motivates and influences development. Topics such as mother-infant attachment, sex-role socialization, cognitive and moral development, reciprocal effects in parent-child interaction, higher stages of adult development, and the revolutionary impact of feminist theory and research on classic models of development are emphasized. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 6030 - Personality Theory and Research


    This course provides an overview of classical and contemporary theory and research in personality. Topics include an examination of various theories including contrasts among psychoanalytic, social learning and humanistic perspectives; current theoretical controversies; the function and evolution of theory; and major methodological issues. Special attention is given to new theories and research on aspects such as intrinsic motivation, emotions, and locus of control, pro-social behavior, self-concept, and personality change. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 6050 - Mindfulness and Spirituality in Clinical Practice


    Mindfulness-based therapies are now accepted as empirically supported’ treatments and are often treatments of choice in mainstream clinical and medical settings. In addition, the prior mainstream taboo regarding including spiritual and/or religious dimensions of life in psychotherapy has been supplanted by the publication of a plethora of texts published by APA and others regarding the integration of these dimensions in clinical practice. This clinical course explores these recent trends that mirror aspects of the long-standing traditions of humanistic, transpersonal, and existential psychology in the integration of mindfulness-based meditation practices, spirituality, and religion and prayer in clinical practice. Through reflective inquiry, students will gain understanding regarding their own experience and views regarding these factors in therapy and how they might locate themselves in relationship to them professionally. Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites.   3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 6060 - Ethics and Laws in Psychotherapy and Behavioral Science Research


    This course is designed to introduce students to professional ethics, standards of conduct, federal and state laws, and board of psychology rules that inform, influence, and/or regulate teaching, clinical practice, and research in professional psychology. The primary foci of the course will be on knowledge of the content and application of professional ethics, federal & state laws, and board of psychology rules. Within the context of self- reflection and examination of personal values and beliefs, students will be introduced to the professional associations and state agencies responsible for leadership, public policy, promulgation of laws, professional practice standards and rules, jurisdictional boundaries, cooperative institutional relationships, and regulatory/administrative procedures. In addition, students will be required to become familiar with federal and state legislative statutes and rules that regulate the professional practice of psychology and conducting behavioral science and biomedical research in their jurisdictions. These include but are not limited to the education and training requirements and filing complaints for misconduct. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 6070 - Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Applied within Humanistic and Integrative Approaches


    This cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) course will offer a review of key foundational theories and concepts, as well as methods of assessing, conceptualizing, and treating patients using CBT approaches. Students will also learn about the efficacy and limitation evidence for utilizing CBT in treating symptoms of several disorders. In addition to learning the key concepts of CBT and practicing core skills, students will examine how CBT can be integrated with humanistic and other integrative therapy approaches. This course will additionally integrate concepts of social justice, strengths-based approaches, wellness, and multiculturalism/diversity as it applies to the adaptation of CBT tools within a humanistic perspective.  Though open to all students, this course satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites.  3 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall Semester
  
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    PSY 6080 - Introduction to Forensic Psychology


    This course is intended to acquaint the student with the emerging field of forensic psychology. Introduced will be a range of applications that psychology offers to the legal arena. Major areas covered include civil commitments, custody evaluations, criminal application, competency to stand trial, violence risk assessments, psychologist as an expert witness, and current best practices with psychological assessment in varied legal contexts. Discussed will be the stance of the humanistic psychologist amongst the adversarial environment of the courtroom and the legal system at large. Prerequisites: Cognitive Assessment; Personality Assessment. Though open to all students, this course satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites.  3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: Spring Course Length: 16 weeks
  
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    PSY 6150 - Existential Psychotherapies II: Rollo May and the Existential Tradition


    Rollo May was the founding parent of existential-humanistic psychology and a pivotal figure in what we may call philosophical/psychological rapprochement. His books, byproducts of a profound disposition and wide-ranging literacy and curiosity, encourage a rich dialogue between philosophy and psychology and the broader humanities. May expresses concretely what he believed from the time of his earliest work: that psychology requires a grounded, theoretically cogent, interdisciplinary approach to human nature. His books remain an auspicious place to start for those interested in learning about what psychology at its most esoteric can be. In this course, we will consider Rollo May’s work and legacy attentively, thereby glimpsing what psychology at its most visionary and rarified might be.  Though open to all students, this course satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. Cross-listed as EHTP 6150. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 6160 - Applied Positive Psychology


    Positive psychology (PP) is the scientific study of optimal human functioning to help people flourish. This Applied PP course is a foundation course to help students not only understand the research on the core themes of positive psychology, but also equip students with the helpful positive interventions in various area areas of professional psychology, such as clinical, health, education, organization and community. Both PP and applied PP courses are in great demand all over the world, because of their broad appeal to students and helping professionals (i.e., counsellors, psychologists, coaches, doctors, social workers, educations, and human resources managers.). PP is the 21st century in much the say way humanistic-existential psychology (HE) was in the 70s. Both appeal to individuals who aspire to promote the well-being in themselves, their clients, and society; both seek to develop a strength-based practice in helping professionals. What makes this course unique is that it has moved from the initial positive psychology narrow focus on positive emotions, positive traits and positive institutions (Seligman & Csikszentmihalyi, 2000) to positive psychology 2.0 (Kashdan & Biswas-Diener, 2014; Wong, 2011) which focuses the totality of the person and the positive potentials in both positive and negative conditions. Another distinctive of this course is that it integrates the best from PP and HP to help people become authentic and fully functioning individuals (Wong, 2010b, in press-b). Advocating a holistic approach towards research, it recommends the triangulation of scientific research findings, time-tested wisdom, and personal experiences as the basis for truths. In sum, this course has the flexibility to meet the career needs and aspirations of individual students through the choice of special projects.  Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 6570 - Race, Class, and Gender


    None of us lives our lives through linear or exclusive experiences of race, class, or gender. Instead, we exist through multiplicities of identity that are informed through race, class, and gender, as well as other social determinants. Human diversity, increasingly framed in terms of intersectionality - focused on the mutual interrelatedness of central social categorizations such as gender, ethnicity/race, social class and sexuality(ies) - is becoming more prominent in research, scholarship, and practice. The goal for this course is modest - to expand our awareness of how race, class, and gender shape our lives, historically and in the present day. If this heightened awareness leads to changes in the way we talk with and about each other, represent the other, provide services, and live our lives on a day-to-day basis, then the course will have more than satisfied its intent. 3.0 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 7500 - Clinical Psychology Graduate Colloquium


    The clinical psychology graduate colloquium is designed to support students throughout their degree program with specific attention to fostering community of learners, preparation and support for practica and internships, preparation and support for graduate-level research, and professional development. Enrollment is a degree required throughout matriculation and affords further support from Faculty Lead, Peer Lead, Academic Advisor and Director of Clinical Training (DCT). 0 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 7510 - Social Psychology


    Social Psychology is fundamental to the study of psychology and the human sciences. In this course, major theories, methods and research findings that comprise the discipline of social psychology are examined from a critical standpoint. The primary objective of this course is to increase students’ awareness of the social, historical, and political dimension to psychological understanding. The application of theoretical and empirical work to real world social problems is emphasized. 3 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 8125 - Internship


    This course is intended for students placed in clinical pre-doctoral internship meeting their licensure requirements and focuses on professional development and advanced clinical skills. Students develop case formulations to recognize issues in assessment, evaluation, and diagnosis, and review treatment models, interventions, and therapeutic outcomes. Authorization from Director of Clinical Training is required to enroll in this course. Note: This course is open to CP students only. 0 credit(s)
  
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    PSY 8145A - Clinical Practicum I


    Students completing clinical practicum placement are enrolled in this course. The course is designed to provide students with a model for thinking about themselves as practitioners, their expectations and concerns, while also providing an arena in which to compare and contrast field placement experiences with other students. Practicum I focuses on professional development important for beginning therapists. Students share from their practicum experience, drawing on their practicum journaling, individual and group exercises, and on-line discussions. Students develop case formulations to recognize issues in assessment, evaluation, and diagnosis, and review treatment models, interventions, and therapeutic outcomes. Authorization for Director of Clinical Training is required to enroll in this course. Note: This course is open to CP students only. Prerequisite(s): Authorization from Director of Clinical Training is required to enroll in this course. 3 credit(s)
 

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