Javascript is currently not supported, or is disabled by this browser. Please enable Javascript for full functionality.

Skip to Main Content
   
2016-2017 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook with Spring Addendum
Saybrook University
   
 
  Apr 11, 2021
 
2016-2017 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook with Spring Addendum 
    
Catalog Navigation
2016-2017 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook with Spring Addendum [Archived Catalog]

Course Descriptions


Courses are identified and organized by degree program. Listed below are those courses that may be offered through the Department of Humanistic & Clinical Psychology for the Psychology degree program as well as the Human Science degree program for the 2015-2016 academic school year. CampusVue will list courses open for enrollment each semester, by Section if applicable.

Courses are identified and organized by degree programs: Clinical Psychology, PhD. Courses listed are offered as online cohort (CO), residential (R), or individually-mentored online (IO). Not all courses are offered every semester. See Program Descriptions and Requirements section of the College of Social Sciences section of this catalog and the Saybrook University website for updates and/or changes to courses.

 

Existential, Humanistic, and Transpersonal Psychology

  
  •  

    EHTP 3140 - Phenomenological Critique of Psychological Systems


    Modern mainstream psychology also developed amorphously, some 30 years after its beginnings it fractionated into various schools: Structuralism, Behaviorism, Psychoanalysis, Gestalt Theory, and Cognitive Psychology. Each of these schools helped to expand psychology from its narrow beginnings, but they also followed, in various degrees, the natural science criteria. The argument of the course is that with a different philosophical basis these newer developments might have given psychology a more adequate frame of reference and a more solid foundation for its work with human beings. Thus a foundational critique of these systems of psychology can throw light on alternative directions for psychology. This course when delivered by a phenomenologist adopts descriptive phenomenology as an alternative framework, but other professors might choose a different basis for the constructive alternative. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    EHTP 3220 - The African Diaspora: African American Cultural History and Psychology


    This first in a sequence of courses on the African Diaspora will focus on the definition, constituents, and historiography of the African Diaspora and greater comprehension of the cultural history and psychology of persons with African ancestry, through the lens of African and African-American psychology. Selected texts for the course have been written by African, African-Caribbean, and African-American scholars. The methodological approach to the study of the African Diaspora is interdisciplinary and draws to the foreground historiography, depth psychology, economics of capitalism, law, mythology, religion, art history, and anthropology for construction of an ancestral ethno-cultural narrative of the African Diaspora against the background of world cultural history. The course content and approach should open and cultivate, through critical thinking, a worldview and means to deconstruct, analyze, comprehend, and reconstruct complex sets of human relations in the African Diaspora from global, regional, national, and personal perspectives. It should allow us to see how the archetype of culture is actualized within institutions, living micro-systems, and psychodynamics of the Diaspora. The specific focus of this course is on African-American cultural history, psychology, and experience from origins in Africa, the Middle Passage, bondage, civil and psychological reconstruction, the Civil Rights movement, Pan-Africanism, and Negritude in America, Europe, the Caribbean, and Africa, Affirmative Action, African-American family life, demographics, health/mental health, illness, spirituality, resilience, and optimal development. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    EHTP 3500 - Humanistic Psychology and Psychotherapy


    This course is intended to provide an introduction to and overview of humanistic psychology, including its origins and tributaries, its historical interrelations with Saybrook, and the possibilities that inhere for its future evolution and significance. We will consider, especially, humanistic psychology’s spheres of influence in the arena of psychotherapy but also in education and upon culture considered more broadly. Humanistic psychology’s critiques of alternate perspectives will be taken up, no less than those that have been leveled at humanistic psychology itself. The course will include an introduction to the writings of a triumvirate of founding parents - Carl Rogers, Abraham Maslow, and Rollo May - as well a consideration of their precursors and the ongoing work of simpatico voices in sister disciplines: Maya Angelou in literature, for example, and Robert Coles in psychiatry. One or two films resonant with core humanistic values/themes will also be included, as will John Coltrane’s sublime 1964 jazz recording, A Love Supreme. The impulse that informs humanistic psychology speaks in various voices. We shall take time in this course to savor its several expressions and callings. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    EHTP 3510 - Transpersonal Psychology and Psychotherapy


    Transpersonal Psychology and Psychotherapy investigates human experiences that transcend the ordinary, particularly spiritual experiences and altered states of consciousness. This course reviews the Western roots of transpersonal psychology in the works of William James, Carl Jung, and Abraham Maslow. It also examines the relationship of transpersonal psychology to spiritual traditions, including shamanism, Buddhism, and Hinduism, as well as mythology and other forms of spiritual investigations. Transpersonal clinical approaches in therapy and research methods are also addressed. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    EHTP 3515 - Foundations of Phenomenological Psychology


    Phenomenological psychological research is rooted in a rich tradition of philosophical and psychological thought. This course offers students an overview of the philosophical background and critique of mainstream psychology that underlies phenomenological psychology. Students will survey the philosophy of Husserl and Merleau-Ponty and read Giorgi’s landmark book, Psychology as a Human Science, which exemplifies the re-envisioning of psychology along phenomenological and humanistic lines. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    EHTP 3520 - Multicultural Perspectives on Death and Loss


    The way individuals experience death and loss is strongly influenced by culture as well as religious and spiritual beliefs. In this course, a variety of different cultural, spiritual, and religious perspectives on death and loss will be explored. Additionally, the course will explore ways individuals in helping roles can work with death and loss in a culturally-sensitive manner. Special attention will be given to existential, humanistic, and transpersonal perspectives to working with cultural differences pertaining to death and loss. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    EHTP 3525 - Microaggressions: An Existential, Humanistic, and Transpersonal Perspective


    One of the most difficult feelings to rid oneself of is the emotional turmoil associated with being denigrated by a person or group in a position of power. Feelings of anger and confusion are often followed with those of inferiority. The internal struggle is exacerbated when it seems obvious that the perpetrator had no ill-intent in conveying the denigrating message. Society is replete with these microaggressions that more often than not go unnoticed yet have a lasting impact on the recipient. This course will define and explore common microaggressions, how they are manifested, and how to respond. Particular attention is given to existential, humanistic, and transpersonal perspectives on microaggressions as well as ways even these perspectives may, at times, also inadvertently perpetuate microaggressions. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    EHTP 3535 - Death, Loss, and Meaning in Existential Psychology


    This course is designed to introduce students to how existential philosophers and psychologists approach and work with the themes of death, loss, and meaning. Death and loss are considered in both their literal and symbolic forms, which encompasses losses associated with many different life transitions. Themes such as transience, impermanence, detachment, and meaning-making will be explored in depth in a professional, clinical, and personal manner. The students will be introduced to the work of philosophers, sociologists, doctors, psychologists, and creative writers as they confront how finitude is an inescapable aspect of our existence. Students will be encouraged to integrate academic theory with personal reflection and application. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    EHTP 3540 - Foundations of Hermeneutic Psychology


    The word hermeneutics comes from Greek ἐρμηνεύς (ermēneús, “translator, interpreter”); hermeneutics is the theory of textual interpretation. This course will examine how hermeneutics as a philosophical theory relates to psychology. The objective is to understand from a theoretical point of view how much psychological method has to do with interpretation. Therefore the course will examine the philosophical texts of Husserl, Ricoeur, Habermas, and Zahavi in order to clarify the foundations of psychological research method from a hermeneutic perspective. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    EHTP 3600 - Carl and Natalie Rogers: A Father-Daughter Legacy of the Person-Centered Approach


    , and the legacy he passed on to her. It covers the person-centered philosophy and research of Carl Rogers and Natalie Rogers’s person-entered approach to expressive arts and her unique process called the Creative Connection. This course lays the groundwork for understanding the philosophical roots of Natalie Rogers’s model of experiential learning and how the creative process puts us in touch with our soul, our spirit, and our inner wisdom. Students will learn how Natalie Rogers’s work in Person-Centered Expressive Arts Therapy promotes self-expression through the creative arts - movement, art, music, and writing, and how it focuses on the inner journey through a creative process fostered by a safe, accepting, non-judgmental, person-centered environment. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    EHTP 3605 - Kabbalah and Transpersonal Psychology


    The objective of this course is to give an overview of the Kabbalah-the esoteric offshoot of Judaism-and its contemporary relevance for transpersonal psychology. The major teachings of the Kabbalah and Hasidism will be presented concerning human personality and growth, as well as classic methods such as meditation for awakening intuition, creativity, and other higher potentialities. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    EHTP 3610 - Transpersonal Neuroscience


    This course examines transpersonal states of consciousness as seen through the eyes of contemporary transpersonal psychology and brain science and the controversies that surround these topics. Sections of the course will examine the nature of consciousness itself, in brain science as well as the philosophy of mind and transpersonal psychology, and explore in nontechnical ways the fundamentals of transpersonal neuroscience and consciousness, looking toward how this approach sheds light on spirituality and higher states of awareness. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    EHTP 3615 - Existential Psychology and Literature


    Kafka, it is clear, read Freud. What might have happened had Freud read Kafka? What if psychology had inclined from the start-as William James, Otto Rank, and Rollo May had urged-toward literary and intuitive epistemologies and conceptions of the mind as it sketched out its apparent topography? Modernist European writers like Pirandello, Woolf, Kafka, Musil, Beckett, and Broch were native psychological geniuses who understood reflexively that existence and psychology could not be systematized-precisely why they opted for fiction and sometimes essay as their preferred methodologies. “No longer joy in certainty but in uncertainty,” exhorted the forward-looking Nietzsche; “No longer ‘cause and effect’ but the continually creative.” In this course, we shall consider selections from the work of some of these modernist masters and several others as well and, so, open up to the crossroads between literature, awareness, world, and the mind. We will be considering, in effect, a gathering of “existential soundings” and thereby inquiring into that, arguably, that only the literary sensibility can say. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    EHTP 6150 - Existential Psychotherapies II: Rollo May and the Existential Tradition


    Rollo May was the founding parent of existential-humanistic psychology and a pivotal figure in what we may call philosophical/psychological rapprochement. His books, byproducts of a profound disposition and wide-ranging literacy and curiosity, encourage a rich dialogue between philosophy and psychology and the broader humanities. May expresses concretely what he believed from the time of his earliest work: that psychology requires a grounded, theoretically cogent, interdisciplinary approach to human nature. His books remain an auspicious place to start for those interested in learning about what psychology at its most esoteric can be. In this course, we will consider Rollo May’s work and legacy attentively, thereby glimpsing what psychology at its most visionary and rarified might be. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    EHTP 8151 - Practicum in Professional Practice


    This course is intended for students seeking practicum training not related to clinical practicum or the MFT program. Students are responsible for arranging the practicum and should consult the director of the EHTP Specialization in order to identify a Saybrook faculty liaison. Prerequisite(s): Open only to students pursuing an EHTP certificate. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    EHTP 8950 - Certificate Integrative Seminar


    The final part of the Certificate is the integrative paper. The purpose of the integrative paper is to give the learner an opportunity to draw together the most important aspects of the Certificate courses, to assess strengths and identify further learning needs, and to develop a specific plan for continuing personal and professional work. Prerequisite(s): Open only to students pursuing an EHTP certificate. 1 credit(s)

Human Science

  
  •  

    HS 1001 - History and Philosophy of the Human Sciences


    This is an introductory course tracing the development of the Human Science approach to the understanding of human thought, experience, institutions, and cultures. It begins with a review of the historical discussions about the nature of knowledge and how we know (epistemology) and the question about whether the natural or “standard” science model is sufficient to understand the subjective and intersubjective facets of human life. It examines the contributions of some of the early initiators of the human science dialogue, including Dilthy, Gadamer, Weber, and Husserl and the expansion of the human science dialogue through critical theory, structuralism, feminism, and postmodernism. The relation of Human Science to humanistic and transpersonal viewpoints, to the natural and social sciences, humanities, studies in religion and spirituality and to mainstream psychology and psychiatry are also considered. The various methods of inquiry that have been developed as a result of this ongoing endeavor to understand the complexities and nuances of human experience are described here, but explored in more detail in the Theories of Inquiry and Critical Theories in the Human Sciences courses. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    HS 1605 - Writing, Film, and Representation in the Human Sciences


    This course explores a variety of ways that individual, social, cultural, and political representations are depicted in various forms of writing and films. The questions are important to all those who seek to understand and interpret the reality of both self and other. Who writes and represents whom? How are the “Self” and the “Other” represented in the human sciences and what are some critiques of representation? Various approaches to self-representation and the representation of others will be explored. Autoethnography, ethnoautobiography, memoir, ethnography, fiction, and biography as represented in film and written forms will be examined and discussed. Students will have reading, writing, and film viewing assignments to enable them to engage fully with the meaning of representation. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    HS 1615 - Story, Self, and Society


    The stories we believe - personal, national, religious, and cultural - shape our lives every day as we make choices at multiple levels from the individual to international bodies. As neuroscientists build on the ancient intuition that we tell stories to know ourselves and the world in which we live, this course will help develop an understanding of what that means for us as individuals and as members of specific communities and as members of the larger natural community. We will refer to the work of many past and current scholars from a variety of disciplines, including philosophers, historians, literary critics, psychologists, ethologists, primatologists, and other social scientists. We will also review how story is being used in business, in education, and in politics to shape ideas of self and society. This course is also an excellent foundation for RES 4005 - Disciplined Inquiry II: Narrative and Auto/Biographical Research , where stories become our texts for learning about the nuances of being human. Understanding the historical legacy of stories and the contemporary research how our pattern seeking brains create stories may deepen the narrative researcher’s understanding as they collect and analyze narrative data. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    HS 1620 - Whole Systems: From Bertalanffy to Bateson and Beyond


    Aristotle is reputed to have said, “the whole is greater than the sum of its parts,” but that perspective on the inter-relationship of things was not reclaimed in the West until the development of systems thinking in the 20th century. We now realize that it is essential to ground our thinking about being human in an understanding of the systems, natural and social, that are the context of human experience. This course includes some earlier ideas about the universe and interconnectedness, but the evolution of systems theory really begins in the 1940s with Karl Ludwig von Bertalanffy and the origins of General Systems Theory (GST). Ervin László and the development of evolutionary systems theory and the transition to the Human Systems Theory of Erich Jantsch and Conrad Waddington are explored and the natural and human systems thinking of Gregory Bateson is introduced with its application to current systems thinking and current research approaches to addressing environmental and social change challenges. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    HS 6140 - Ethics for the Human Sciences


    This course examines Western and Eastern ethical theories discussing the concepts and ethical problems that social science researchers may encounter. The course considers ‘morality in practice’ examining the nature of professional ethics and the challenges professionals face, and discussing a variety of ethical issues such as euthanasia, abortion, sexuality, preferential treatment, the distribution of wealth and income, animal rights, punishment and responsibility, terrorism, war, and nuclear deterrence. Issues related to various human and social science disciplines are analyzed and the ethical aims and moral shortcomings of human and social science theories, methodologies, policies, and practices are investigated. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    HS 6580 - Cultural Criticism


    Cultural criticism is a recent synthesis of work in anthropology, literary criticism, feminist studies, cultural and intellectual history, African-American studies, semiotics, philosophy, political studies, and many other disciplines. Its foci are on the understandings and practices that comprise our subjectivity and the contexts of our daily lives; how those understandings and practices are institutionalized, legitimized, and rationalized; how they shape our experiences and interactions with ourselves, our intimate relationships, and contemporary American society. The course examines the identity of knowledge and power as expressed in the media, psychotherapy, medicine, education, prisons, and language. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    HS 6581 - Human Science Studies: Religion, Politics, Science, and Culture


    We will approach this topic from the perspective of cultural/social narratives and how those stories shape our approach to contemporary social problems. We will begin with a brief review of the origins of belief and ritual systems from the perspectives of Anthropology and Sociology through the development of historical and contemporary religious expressions in traditional religions and cults. We will explore a variety of beliefs and rituals associated with a number of World religions, including Christianity, Buddhism, Islam, and others. With this foundation, we will investigate the relationship between these religious perspectives and contemporary political debates on personal morality, social responsibility, the role of science in public policy, international relations, world peace, and other social issues. We will not focus on theological issues, except incidentally as we consider religion in the context of various cultures. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    HS 6583 - Human Science Studies: Class, Race, and Gender


    This course provides a foundation to study contemporary social problems related to issues of class, race, and gender. Basic readings develop the theoretical and historical foundation of these issues in terms of Western culture, and the United States in particular. Concepts of class are at the core of analyzing social structures and systems and from the Human Science perspective, particularly, the analysis of power arrangements. The concept of race and the practices of racism are some of the most enduring aspects of the human condition. Similarly, concepts of gender shape individual and cultural arrangements between the sexes and influence both individual freedom and social policy. Here we clarify these terms and review theory and current knowledge associated with each and their intersections in different domains. Students can choose to study any of these and their impact in various settings, for example, in business, politics, education, health, religion, criminal justice, or government, with a focus on facilitating transformative change. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    HS 7570 - Critical Theories for the Human Sciences


    Critical Theories in the Human Sciences takes a broad view beginning with the European philosophical roots of Critical Theory and then exploring critical theories arising from post- modernism, deconstructionism, and contemporary theories from the social sciences and humanities. Some themes to be addressed are: culture and identity; the politics of race and gender; public and private behavior in the Internet era; neuroscience and western philosophy; and how to negotiate relationships in an ethical and enriching manner in a multi-national, multi-cultural global environment. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    HS 9200 - Master’s Project (M.A.)


    This course is designed for students who intend to complete a master’s degree culminating project that will not involve the use of human participants in any way (e.g., an expanded literature review; developing an intervention or program, but without implementation or piloting in any way; writing a training manual based on theory only, etc.). For HS 9200, no committee is formed; that is, the course has one instructor only. In addition, the student does not need to go through the Institutional Review Board review and approval process for this course nor is there a project oral examination attached. If opting for HS 9200, the course supervisor must be a member of the Human Science degree program faculty or someone approved by the Department director. 3 credit(s)

Jungian Studies

  
  •  

    JS xxxx - TBD


    February 12 & 13, 2016 TBD
  
  •  

    JS 8808 - Psychology, Religion, and the East


    Volume 11 of the Collected Works of C.G. Jung contains shorter works on psychotherapy and religion. Part 1 focuses on western religion, while part two contains essays on eastern traditions, including commentaries on The Tibetan Book of the Great Liberation, The Tibetan Book of the Dead, The Psychology of Eastern Meditation, and an introduction that Jung prepared for Suzuki’s classic Introduction to Zen Buddhism. This class will include readings from this volume and focus with particular attention to Jung’s essay “The Secret of The Golden Flower” from CW Volume 15. This course explores the historical/cultural context of C.G. Jung’s considerations of Eastern belief systems, similarities and differences in Jungian psychology and beliefs and practices of Hinduism and Buddhism, and compares concepts such as mindfulness, maya, and enlightenment with psychological concepts such as active imagination, projection, and individuation. November 13 & 14, 2015 1 credit(s)
  
  •  

    JS 8817 - The Development of Personality


    Jung thought of individuation as a “vocation,” having archetypal roots, and saw it as a “calling” and expressed as a mythic drama. He also understood the consequences of both following and refusing that call. Through an in-depth study of Jung’s essay on “The Development of Personality” (Vol. 17 of the CW), this course considers Jung’s seminal idea of “individuation” in relation to the archetypal ideal of “personality.” We will examine how personality develops in the context of Jung’s psychological theory, as well as the influences that incline us towards or away from individuation in our own lives. October 9 & 10, 2015 1 credit(s)
  
  •  

    JS 8819 - Mysterium Coniunctionis


    Mysterium Coniunctionis, Volume 14 of the Collected Works of C.G. Jung, presents Jung’s last great work, on which he was engaged for more than a decade, from 1941 to 1954. He finished it in his 80th year. As is to be expected from its culminating position in his writings and from its subject matter, the book gives a final account of his lengthy researches into alchemy. Jung’s interest in the symbolical significance of alchemy for modern depth psychology, his interest in the coniunctio as it relates to the psychology of the transference, and the relation between alchemy and Christianity were concerns throughout his working life. All these themes are brought together in Mysterium Coniuntionis, where Jung continues his work of interpretation by examining in detail a number of texts taken from the alchemical classics. The scope of the book is indicated in its subtitle: “An Inquiry into the Separation and Synthesis of Psychic Opposites in Alchemy.” This process, summed up in the trenchant formula solve et coagula - “dissolve and coagulate” - underlines the opus alchymicum and may be symbolically understood as the process of psychic integration. December 11 & 12, 2015 1 credit(s)
  
  •  

    JS 8822 - The Red Book


    ddition to losing Freud’s friendship, Jung also resigned from his teaching at the University of Zurich. He went into a period of intense introversion, only seeing his clients and his family. Much of his time was spent with visions and dreams from the unconscious flooding his ego consciousness at that time. The publication of this book has been very exciting for the Jungian world as many of us thought it would never be published. The content is so private and personal. This book will rank among the finest of spiritual and psychological autobiographies like the work of St. Theresa of Avila, Erasmus, and Hildegard of Bingen, among others. Jung confronts the unconscious and comes out a changed person with a new understanding of how we must learn to relate to the unconscious. April 8 & 9, 2016 1 credit(s)
  
  •  

    JS 8829 - The Spirit in Man, Art, and Literature


    Volume 15 of the Collected Works of C.G. Jung is comprised of nine essays of general rather than technical interest. In these papers, written between 1922 and 1941, Jung’s attention was directed mainly to the qualities of personality that enabled the creative spirit to introduce radical innovations into realms as diverse as medicine, psychoanalysis, Oriental studies, the visual arts, and literature. Essays on Paracelsus, Freud, the sinologist Richard Wilhelm, Picasso, and James Joyce’s Ulysses are supplemented by two others that consider artistic creativity generally and explore its source in archetypal structures. January 8 & 9, 2016 1 credit(s)
  
  •  

    JS 8850 - Post-Jungian Seminar on the Work of Edward Edinger


    This seminar will study the seminal post-Jungian text by Edward Edinger, Ego and Archetype, as well as his book Transformation of Libido. Ego and Archetype presents the “individual’s journey to psychological wholeness, known in analytical psychology as the process of individuation. Edinger traces the stages in this process and relates them to the search for meaning through encounters with symbolism in religion, myth, dreams, and art. For contemporary men and women, Edinger believes, the encounter with the self is equivalent to the discovery of God. The result of the dialogue between the ego and the archetypal image of God is an experience that dramatically changes the individual’s worldview and makes possible a new and more meaningful way of life.” Transformation of Libido: A Seminar on C.G. Jung’s Symbols of Transformation describes the hazards to the ego and self and further explores Jung’s ideas of the role of libido, or life energy, in the process of individuation. The class will work with the archetype of the pilgrimage as an expression of the unfolding of consciousness and transformation of libido in the journey along the ego-self axis. Each student will write and present a paper to the class with a short period of discussion following. March 11 & 12, 2016 1 credit(s)
  
  •  

    JS 8900 - Jungian Studies Capstone Project


    The capstone paper requires students to demonstrate the ability to pursue a topic focusing on Jungian and/or analytic subject matter. This paper should include a clear thesis to be addressed, or a comparative study (e.g., Freud versus Jung on a particular topic), or symbolic analysis of a text or cultural form. Additionally, students will demonstrate knowledge of other applicable literature on their subject, as well as independent thinking and research. Prerequisite(s): Open only to students pursuing a Jungian Studies certificate. 1 credit(s)

MA in Management

  
  •  

    MAM 8000 - Sustainable 21st Century Organizational Systems, Behavior, and Cultures


    The contemporary business enterprise is a distributed organization that draws upon a global workforce. This gives rise to new organizational models and systems as well as complex challenges. This course explores organizational behavior and processes in a global context. It critically examines core characteristics and dynamics of the distributed organization with an emphasis on management approaches shaped by social systems, network and cross-cultural perspectives and organizational structures and operations processes founded in human-centric and workplace and information systems principles. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    MAM 8001 - Global Economies, Markets, and Supply Chains


    With the emergence of interdependent worldwide economies, business organizations are shifting from envisioning themselves as highly competitive international businesses to profitable sustainable global enterprises. This mindset gives rise to new business strategies, financial management principles, collaborative forms of inter-organizational partnerships and alliances, and innovative operational processes, including sustainable approaches to gaining and serving global markets, managing global supply chains and reaching business goals. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    MAM 8002 - Managing Distributed Organizations


    This course has a “workshop” approach, providing students an opportunity to creatively experiment with and practically apply the concepts and practices examined in MAM 8000  & MAM 8001  to organizational settings. It enables the further development of students’ own perspectives while integrating new learning into existing professional management approaches and workplace practices. There is a particular focus on managers applying a global organizational systems mindset in business enterprises, innovatively leading in international and inter-organizational settings, establishing a consistent distributed organizational culture and orchestrating complex supply chain operations. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    MAM 8003 - Dispersed Workforce Characteristics, Environments, and Issues


    Managing a global workforce requires more than having good management skills and having some knowledge about cultural customs. It takes envisioning others as work colleagues even though they live and work in another country, being culturally sensitive and being aware of colleagues’ social events and life situations. It involves developing a cosmopolitan perspective and understanding how world issues impact the organization’s operations and workplace dynamics. This course examines the core characteristics of a global workforce and the complex business, political, economic and social issues that managers routinely face. With a cosmopolitan mindset as a backdrop, it centers on how to lead and manage in an intercultural business setting and how to establish work cultures, relationships, and procedures that not only respect but value and draw upon the strengths of culturally diverse worldviews, business principles, leadership approaches, values and work styles. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    MAM 8004 - Managing and Engaging Human Resources: Domestic and International Principles, Practices and Issues


    A business’ most valuable asset is its workforce. The resourcefulness of its employees, including its leadership, when consciously leveraged in a strategic and innovative manner, can differentiate a business and give it a competitive edge. This course discusses critical international human resource management principles, practices, issues and challenges, as well as the core characteristics and practices of engaging workplaces and the attributes of the current global organizations that are rated the best places to work. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    MAM 8005 - Managing Across Cultures


    This course has a “workshop” approach, providing students an opportunity to creatively experiment with and practically apply the concepts and practices examined in MAM 8003  & MAM 8004  to organizational settings. It enables the further development of students’ own perspectives while integrating new learning into existing professional management approaches and workplace practices. There is a particular focus on how to address realistically the challenges created by distributed organizations and telework, including how to effectively communicate across cultures, develop trusting work relationships, create “high presence” virtual work environments and meetings and handle conflict. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    MAM 8006 - The Network Organization: Evolving Communication Systems and Strategic Partnerships


    An organization is a complex system of ever-evolving networks and partnerships set in place to enable it accomplish its mission, reach its objectives, efficiently function, innovate to address challenges and remain vital and serve its markets. Its operational processes and environments are a dynamic web of internal and external workplace relationships, conversations and communities of practice supported by a sophisticated technological infrastructure for information, communication and collaboration. This course critically examines how managers establish a network culture and workplace infrastructure that fosters a dynamic system of formal and informal networks so vital business partnerships and alliances function effectively, organizational policies are communicated, information is shared, creative dialogues occur, knowledge is generated, innovation takes place, decisions are collaboratively made and work gets accomplished. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    MAM 8007 - Strategic Information Systems, Knowledge Ecologies, and Technology


    organizational structure and way of conducting business in a global context. This includes managing an organization’s supply chain, plus building and maintaining customer relationships and providing customer service. Utilizing an inter-organizational perspective and knowledge ecology framework, this course exams how to design innovative intra- and inter-organizational business structures and work systems. It also explores how to deploy information, communication and collaboration technology to engage business partners and motivate knowledge workers, how to foster collaborative organizational networks and cross-cultural teams, and how to promote efficient and effective decision making and daily operations. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    MAM 8008 - Social Network Analysis, Partnership Facilitation, and Conflict Resolution


    This course has a “workshop” approach, providing students an opportunity to creatively experiment with and practically apply the concepts and practices examined in MAM 8006  & MAM 8007  to organizational settings. It enables the further development of students’ own perspectives while integrating new learning into existing professional management approaches and workplace practices. There is a particular focus on how managers can develop knowledge sharing organizational structures and cultures, establish communities of practice, analyze organizational networks and design and implement “high presence” virtual workplace platforms. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    MAM 8010 - Communication and Group Dynamics: Qualities, Strategies, and Processes for Leaders


    Rooted in the foundational notion that organizations are complex social systems and dynamic networks of strategic human relationships and conversations, this course critically examines various approaches to managerial communication and relationship building in organizational settings. Because these involve building trust and community as well as using power appropriately, particular attention is given to emotional and cultural intelligence. In light of these principles, the course explores the nature of group behavior and dynamics, team operations, member roles, and the challenges each present to managers as they strive to establish cohesive, engaging social networks.  3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    MAM 8011 - Organizational Change and Development: Approaches and Issues


    In a highly competitive business environment, change is inevitable. Organizational leaders need to understand the nature of change, how it operates, and how to harness its power to unleash innovation to create an organization’s future. This course critically examines how to enable an organization to transform itself so it can be vital, resilient, and prosperous. It explores (a) the relationship between organizational learning, innovation, and transformation, (b) how change can be approached from an adaptive systems perspective, and (c) the types of organizational cultures that support successful change management processes and continuous development. It also focuses on how change-agent leaders can address resistance, resolve conflict, and use design thinking to manage innovation efforts more effectively.  3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    MAM 8012 - Socially Responsible Accounting and Financial Management


    This course provides managers with a background to aid in making decisions about the management of assets and the financing of organizational growth. It sets foundations in current economic perspectives, organizational integrity, and sustainability principles, and examines financial principles to inform study about key accounting practices for operational purposes. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    MAM 8013 - Marketing in a Global Internet Age


    This course critically examines marketing as an integrative process. To do so, it takes into account the global marketplace, consumer behavior patterns, and how the Internet and social media have revolutionized the way customers communicate and engage with businesses. Within that context, the course explores the issues in key analytical areas of global markets, consumer behavior, and planning and product strategies. These foundations enable managers to develop a balance in marketing decisions that consider prices, channels of distribution, physical movement of goods, communications, advertising, personal sales, and other factors. Customer relationship management systems are also discussed. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    MAM 8014 - Sustainable Operations and Organizational Systems


    The course covers the fundamentals of effective supply chain management from an organizational systems standpoint.  A key focus is on the design of global supply chain networks and how they are strategically managed. The course introduces a framework that identifies the key drivers of supply chain performance: facilities, inventory, transportation, information, sourcing, and pricing. Students acquire practical managerial concepts and skills that enable them to examine and improve supply chain performance. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    MAM 8015 - Project Management and Execution: A Social Systems Approach


    With organizational systems and collaborative management principles and practices as the foundation, this course examines the fundamental nature of both project management and enterprise relationship management. With the global workplace as the context, it introduces the core concepts of project management, and critically examines related issues and practices. Among other topics, it explores how effective project management entails consistently communicating with internal and external stakeholders associated with various aspects of project, recruiting team members, managing the relationships with project managers and team members, and procuring the needed financial resources and materials. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    MAM 8016 - Managing Cost, Resources, and Vendors


    Project management involves overseeing a portfolio of interrelated tasks that must be aligned with the enterprise’s strategic goals and operational processes to ensure successful and timely completion of the project.  Essential preliminary tasks are identified, including the creation of budgets, realistic timelines, reporting procedures, and vendor arrangements.  Utilizing a systems approach, this course examines effective approaches for (a) clearly scoping the project, (b) charting its components and processes, (c) identifying  factors that can impact its progress, (d) obtaining the resources needed for success, (e)managing the  project budget, and (f) managing vendors. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    MAM 8017 - Project Schedule, Quality Control, and Risk Management


    Risk management, benchmarking and outcomes assessment are critical to successful project planning and progress measurement.  This course focuses on understanding core quality management principles and approaches and how to manage risk. Central to the course is an understanding of the nature of risk and its impacts. The course applies a systems and collaborative management perspective to critically examine how to design and use the appropriate assessment strategies, tools, and processes throughout a project. It addresses how to integrate them as key components of the project structure, execute them, and use assessment findings to make effective corrections. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    MAM 8020 - Designing and Managing Collaborative Workplace Systems and Virtual Teams


    Neither managers, nor the employees that they lead, work in isolation. Interaction among employees can be structured in many ways because workplace collaboration has many forms. With a critical examination of the nature of virtual teams, their essential components and processes and their challenges as a backdrop, this course discusses virtual team management in the wider context of developing collaborative workplace systems in globally distributed organizations. Central to this exploration are the issues related to “organizational collaborative readiness,” critical qualities and skills needed by virtual team leaders and members, self-management, “virtual space as interactive place,” communication processes and global team dynamics. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    MAM 8025 - Systems Thinking, Analytics and Ethical Decision Making


    Business enterprises daily face new and complex situations that call for “out-of-the-box” thinking and entrepreneurial problem solving. Individuals and teams need organizational intelligence, the knowledge and practical wisdom contained in the workforce and the networks in which they participate, to make well informed and innovative decisions. With systems thinking, transdisciplinary analysis and integrative principles as a foundation, this course examines the art of solving problems collaboratively, making organizational decisions and taking sustainable, ethical action, as well as promoting innovation and taking the risk to try new ideas and approaches in a distributed intercultural work environment. The course also explores effective use of technology to accomplish this. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    MAM 8030 - Program Capstone: Strategically Leading People, Projects, and Innovation


    With project management in distributed organizations and work-life integration as its focus, this course concludes the MAM program, tying together all of the business, management and organizational concepts, skill sets and workplace applications studied and developed throughout the various courses. The Capstone project enables students to articulate your own forward thinking vision and practice of empowering and ethical global management, demonstrate your empowering management and problem solving skills through analyzing and resolving a case study, and chart your career path through a professional portfolio. 3 credit(s)

Mind-Body Medicine

  
  •  

    MBM 1009 - Information Competency & Research Skills


    This course is designed for students to leverage prior learning experience and acquire new skills for graduate/doctoral study and lifelong learning. This course introduces students to the process of defining and articulating information needs related to a specific topic: identifying, evaluating, and selecting the appropriate resources; developing and executing research strategies; critically interpreting and analyzing results; and presenting them in a professional style (APA, 6th ed.). 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA - Term A/SP - Term A. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks (Term A). No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.4, 5.2, 5.3, 7.1, 7.3
  
  •  

    MBM 5500 - Ethics in Healthcare


    This course is an overview of the ethical principles and codes of conduct that formulate the guidelines for ethical practice in integrative healthcare. This core ethics course focuses on a breadth of ethical considerations and concerns pertinent to the evolving field of Integrative Medicine. An introduction to medical ethics and the Code of Conduct created by the American Psychological Association is provided. Ethical issues involving spirituality and faith are explored. This course helps students consider ethical issues related to various professional disciplines that embody the field of Integrative Medicine. Students are encouraged to explore their own personal values, beliefs, and biases pertaining to moral and legal ethics in the field. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA - Term B/SP - Term B. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.1 (3), 1.3 (3), 1.4 (4)
  
  •  

    MBM 5506 - Certificate Colloquium and Integrative Capstone


    This course will orient students to the fundamentals of graduate study as they learn to develop and apply critical thinking and reasoning skills necessary to demonstrate academic scholarship. In addition, the course will be facilitated by mentors to assist Certificate students as they discuss personal and professional aspirations and goals. The online platform provides a supportive and engaging environment as mentors and students connect and learn from each other’s experiences. At the culmination of the certificate program students develop an integrative capstone essay synthesizing the student’s personal, academic, and professional learning on an application of mind-body medicine. 1 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA - Term A/SP - Term A. Course Length: Course Length: 16 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: TBA
  
  •  

    MBM 5507 - Graduate Level Academic Writing


    Students will increase their awareness of professional and scholarly writing and American Psychological Association (APA, 6th ed.) editorial and formatting standards. Students will also become familiar with various writing and scholarly paper formats. They will become familiar with the mechanics of writing, organization, and style. Students will work on applying academic standards through the concise execution of scholarly writing. Students will learn to evaluate their own writing and the writing of others and gain editing skills. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA - Term B/SP - Term B. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: LO 1.3, 1.4 (2) 5.4, 6.3, 7.1(4), 8.1 (2)
  
  •  

    MBM 5510 - Imagery for Health


    This course reviews the place of imagery and the imagination in traditional healing practices, and the contemporary applications of imagery in healthcare. Students review the experimental evidence for the impact of imagery on immune function, neurochemistry, and medical illness. Students learn to utilize imagery as a diagnostic tool, as a medical rehearsal for coping, and as a therapeutic tool for medical illness and emotional disorders. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA - Term A. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.2 (3), 2.2(3), 2.4(4), 3.1(4), 3.2(4), 4.3(3), 5.1 (3), 5.3 (3), 7.1(3).
  
  •  

    MBM 5511 - Graduate Colloquium I


    The Graduate Colloquium I class is an orientation to the fundamentals of graduate study and academic scholarship.  This course is designed to support new students as they (a) articulate personal and professional aspirations and goals, and (b) develop and apply critical thinking and reasoning skills.  The online platform provides an engaging environment for the cohort to connect and learn from each other’s experiences. 1 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA - Term A/SP - Term A Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: L.O. 7.1 (2), 8.1 (3)
  
  •  

    MBM 5512 - Graduate Colloquium II


    The Graduate Colloquium II assists students in professional development, career planning strategies, and ongoing mentor-coaching and feedback support.  Students enroll in this course toward the end of their degree program. Prerequisite(s):  MBM 5511 . 1 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA - Term A Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: L.O. 7.1 (2), 8.1 (3).
  
  •  

    MBM 5522 - Health Psychology: The Application of Psychological Concepts and Tools to Health


    “Psychologists who strive to understand how biological, behavioral, and social factors influence health and illness are called health psychologists” (APA Division 38, 2002). The subject matter of Health Psychology as a discipline overlaps greatly with the fields of integrative health and mind-body medicine. In the broadest sense, Health Psychology is the organized and systematic effort to apply the knowledge and skills of the behavioral sciences to human health and illness. It presents the framework, methodology, and applications of mainstream health psychology, and reviews common applications of health psychology. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SP - Term B. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.1 (3), 2.1 (3), 2.2 (4), 2.4 (4), 5.2 (4), 7.1 (4).
  
  •  

    MBM 5524 - Contemporary Neuroscience-Psychology and the Brain


    This course explores brain and nervous system relationships with special emphasis on clinical examples and mind- body interactions. Beginning with the basic function of nerve cells (neurophysiology) we explore how cells communicate (the synapse and clinical neurochemistry) and the structure of the nervous system (neuroanatomy). Students learn about the most current neuro-imaging techniques. We explore neuroscience of the senses, emotion, arousal and stress. Neuroscience in Depression, Schizophrenia, Autism, and ADHD are investigated. The class concludes with a discussion of the biology of consciousness, meditation, and the brain-mind question. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA - Term B. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.2 (2), 2.2 (1), 2.2 (3), 3.1 (3), 4.2 (4).
  
  •  

    MBM 5525 - Grant Writing


    This course explores the process of grant proposal writing from initial inquiry through submittal. Students completing the course will develop a grant proposal idea, research and choose a potential funder based upon funder guidelines, and understand each component of a proposal. The student finishes the class with a complete and thoughtfully-prepared grant proposal ready for submittal. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5540  or MBM 5542   3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered - SP - Term B. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.3, 1.4, 3.4, 5.2, 6.2, 7.1, 7.3, 8.1, 8.2
  
  •  

    MBM 5533 - Health Informatics: The Science of Healthcare Information


    This course introduces students to the field of health informatics with particular emphasis on evaluating the effectiveness of technology interfaces with both conventional and integrative health care practitioners as well as patients. Students will learn Federal legislative requirements for health information technology use by healthcare systems as well as individual practitioners. The electronic medical record, electronic health record, personal health record, clinical decision support systems, telemedicine, and mobile health (m-health) will be explored in detail. Patient satisfaction and increased quality of care are two of the primary reasons for the mandatory adoption of health technology. As a result, the role of the patient in health informatics is woven throughout the course. The structure of this class is designed so that students are placed in the role of consultant or manager, becoming proficient in the application of health information technology. Each student will research a health care application and its impact on a patient population. The primary purpose of the research assignment is to describe the impact of the on the larger healthcare system [this can be specific to a regional healthcare system, the U.S. national system, or global health]. This course will not require prior software knowledge other than a working level of understanding in navigation with Microsoft Operating Systems and the Office Suite. Successful completion of the course will require a basic knowledge of on-line research methods and the use of available and authoritative databases. The course will progress over a period of 8 modules with an integrative paper due in Module 7, a mid-term analysis of technical briefs, and a final exam. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA - Term B. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.1 (3), 1.4 (2), 1.4 (3), 2 (3), 2.1 (3), 5 (3), 5.1 (3), 8 (3), 8.2 (2), 8.2 (3), 8.3 (2), 8.3 (3)
  
  •  

    MBM 5540 - Fundamentals of Research


    This course is a foundational “research literacy course” which provides an overview of quantitative and qualitative research. Students will learn about the elements of a research study. Students will learn to read and evaluate research studies to support their individual research interests based on current scholarship. Prerequisite(s): 1007/1008 or 1027/1028 or MBM 1009 . 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA - Term A/B/SP - Term A/B. Course Length: Course Length: 16 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.4, 2.2, 5.1, 7.1, 7.2, 7.4, 7.5
  
  •  

    MBM 5542 - Research Literacy for Scholar Practitioners


    This course is a foundational “research literacy course” which provides an overview of quantitative and qualitative research.  Students will learn about the elements of a research study.  Students will learn to read and evaluate research studies to support their individual research interests based on current scholarship. Prerequisite(s): MBM 1009   3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered: FA-Term B, SP-Term B. Course Length: Course Length: 8 weeks No RC Required Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.4, 5.1, 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 7.4
  
  •  

    MBM 5543 - Statistical Methods for Healthcare Research I


    This course provides an overview on the use of statistical methods in healthcare research. Students a) become familiar with statistics, b) understand the most commonly used statistics for graduate research, and c) comprehend the relationship between statistical techniques, sample size, and statistical significance. Prerequisite(s): 5538 or MBM 5553 , and 5539 or MBM 5557 . 2 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SP - Term A. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 7 (3), 7(4), 7.1 (4), 7.2 (4)
  
  •  

    MBM 5545 - Assessing Systems and Processes in Healthcare


    This course introduces students to a systems-oriented approach to assessing healthcare systems and processes. This course provides methods for healthcare consultants, administrators, and researchers to evaluate care systems, processes, and outcomes in holistic and humanistic ways through the use of systems-oriented approaches. Students learn to adapt a systems and organizational perspective, identify problems in care systems, and assess the outcomes of systemic changes. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SP - Term A. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 5.1 (5), 5.3 (3), 6.1 (3), 6.3 (3), 7.1 (4), 8.1 (4), 8.2 (3), 8.2 (5), 8.4 (4), 8.5 (3), 8.5 (5).
  
  •  

    MBM 5546 - Statistical Methods for Healthcare Research II


    This course provides a continuation of the prerequisite course, MBM 5543 . This course provides an overview on the use of statistical methods in healthcare research. Students a) become familiar with statistics, b) understand the most commonly used statistics for graduate research, and c) comprehend the relationship between statistical techniques, sample size, and statistical significance. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5543 . 1 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SP - Term B. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 7 (3), 7 (4), 7.1 (4), 7.2 (4).
  
  •  

    MBM 5551 - Doctoral Research Pilot Study I


    This course guides students in developing a qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods research design, serving as a pilot study for dissertation research. The course meets the following objectives: Students a) propose and refine a research question, b) develop a research design, addressing recruitment, interventions, any measurements, and data collection methods, c) specify methods for data analysis, and d) submit a SIRB application, assuring the protections of human participants. By the end of the second segment of the course, students a) implement the research design, b) recruit participants, c) conduct the research, and d) prepare a written research report, including all of the elements in a research report. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5540 , 5538, or 5548 or MBM 5553  or MBM 5556 ; 5539, 5549 or MBM 5557 . 1 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered all terms. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: L.O. 6.1, 7.1, 7.3, 7.4.
  
  •  

    MBM 5552 - Doctoral Research Pilot Study II


    This course serves as a continuation of the prerequisite course MBM 5551 . This course guides students in developing a qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods research design, serving as a pilot study for dissertation research. The course will meet the following objectives: Students a) propose and refine a research question, b) develop a research design, addressing recruitment, interventions, any measurements, and data collection methods, c) specify methods for data analysis, and d) submit a SIRB application, assuring the protections of human participants. By the end of the second segment of the course, students a) implement the research design, b) recruit participants, c) conduct the research, and d) prepare a written research report, including all of the elements in a research report. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5540 ; MBM 5551 ; 5538. 5538, or 5548 or MBM 5553  or MBM 5556 ; 5539, 5549 or MBM 5557 . 2 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered all terms. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: L.O. 6.1, 7.1, 7.3, 7.4.
  
  •  

    MBM 5553 - Quantitative Research Overview


    This course will introduce students to the characteristics and various approaches to designing and conducting quantitative research projects in health care.  It provides an overview of the research process beginning with the identification of a research topic and question, reviewing literature, selecting a study approach, and proceeding through the collection and analysis of data and writing up findings.  In this course students will identify a topic for their pilot study and review relevant literature.  They will also begin to develop a research question and identify other aspect of the research design that them may include in their pilot study and dissertation. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5540 . 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA - Term A/SP - Term B. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 7.1 (4), 7.2 (3), 7.3 (2), 7.3 (3).
  
  •  

    MBM 5554 - Advanced Pilot Study Course


    This course guides students in developing a qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods research design, serving as a pilot study for dissertation research. The course will meet the following objectives: Students a) propose and refine a research question, b) develop a research design, addressing recruitment, interventions, any measurements, and data collection methods, c) specify methods for data analysis, and d) submit a SIRB application, assuring the protections of human participants. By the end of the course, students a) implement the research design, b) recruit participants, c) conduct the research, and d) prepare a written research report, including all of the elements in a research report. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5540 , 5538, 5548, MBM 5553  or MBM 5556 , 5539, 5549, MBM 5554  and MBM 5557 . 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered all terms. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: L.O. 6.1, 7.1, 7.3, 7.4.
  
  •  

    MBM 5555 - Doctoral Research Pilot Study


    This course guides students in developing a qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods research design, serving as a pilot study for dissertation research. The course will meet the following objectives: Students a) propose and refine a research question, b) develop a research design, addressing recruitment, interventions, any measurements, and data collection methods, c) specify methods for data analysis, and d) submit a SIRB application, assuring the protections of human participants. By the end of the course, students a) implement the research design, b) recruit participants, c) conduct the research, and d) prepare a written research report, including all of the elements in a research report. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered all terms. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: L.O. 6.1, 7.1, 7.3, 7.4.
  
  •  

    MBM 5556 - Qualitative Research Overview


    This course introduces students to the characteristics and various approaches to designing and conducting qualitative research projects in health care. It provides an overview of the qualitative research process and various qualitative methodologies. The student will learn to select a research topic, formulate a research question and/or hypothesis, identify an appropriate research methodology and design, and conduct a literature review. Students will articulate a research topic and question, select an appropriate methodology, and identify and review literature relevant to their interest and application. They will also begin to develop a research design and identify other aspects of the research process that they may include in their pilot study and dissertation. This course also supports students in applying the course subject matter toward ongoing research and clinical interests, in conjunction with other courses and learning experiences in the student’s graduate studies. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5540 . 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SP - Term B/SU - Term A. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 7.1 (4), 7.2 (3), 7.3 (2), 7.3 (3).
  
  •  

    MBM 5557 - Advanced Research Method


    This course will help prepare students for their research in the pilot study and dissertation by guiding them to study a specific research methodology or approach.  Students will study a pre-identified method in depth and identify aspects of the research design to include in their pilot study and dissertation.  Coursework will direct students to individually develop a research design, address sample recruitment, interventions, any measurements and tools, data collection methods, and specify methods for data analysis. This course also supports students in preparing to be scholar-practitioners in conjunction with other courses and learning experiences in the student’s graduate studies. Prerequisite(s): 1007, 1008, 1027, 1028 or MBM 1009 , MBM 5540 , 5548 or 5538 or MBM 5553  or MBM 5556 . 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered all terms. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 7.1 (4), 7.2(3), 7.3 (2), 7.3 (3).
  
  •  

    MBM 5558 - Advanced Research Method II


    This course will help prepare students for their research in the pilot study and dissertation by guiding them to study a specific research methodology or approach. Students will study a pre-identified method in depth and identify aspects of the research design to include in their pilot study and dissertation. Coursework will direct students to individually develop a research design, address sample recruitment, interventions, any measurements and tools, data collection methods, and specify methods for data analysis.

    This course also supports students in preparing to be scholar-practitioners in conjunction with other courses and learning experiences in the student’s graduate studies. This course is for students who have already taken MBM 5557 Advanced Research Methods and who are learning an additional research methodology. Prerequisite(s): 5548, MBM 5540 , MBM 5557 . 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered all terms. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 7.1 (4), 7.2(3), 7.3 (2), 7.3 (3).

  
  •  

    MBM 5564 - Integrative Healthcare as a Complex Adaptive System


    This introductory course provides students with an overview of healthcare policy and introduces complexity theory as an approach to further an integrative healthcare agenda. Course materials provide students with an overview of U.S. contemporary healthcare policy and then introduce complexity principles as one subset of systems thinking. Through both theory and practice, using principles from complexity, and assignments that combine theory and application, students will learn to recognize dynamic widespread phenomena and individual human interactions in basic ways that inform better understanding and communication, particularly as these relate to integrative healthcare. This perspective offers a valuable foundation for designing or changing complex human systems like businesses, hospitals and healthcare systems, and taking on an advocacy role in complementary integrative medicine. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SU - Term A. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.1 (3), 5.1 (4), 5.2 (5), 7.1 (3)
  
  •  

    MBM 5567 - Leadership in Healthcare


    This course takes the perspective that leadership in healthcare systems is about individuals, roles, culture, and systems. Leadership is about personal, team, and organizational values. Exceptional leadership involves self-awareness, a compelling vision, emotional intelligence, a philosophy of serving and developing others, and masterful implementation. All need to be included to comprehend the nature of, the development of, and the practice of leadership. Leadership represents a holistic view of the relationships among individuals, cultures, and systems. It proposes three distinctions that will assist in clarifying thinking about leadership, its development and practices: leading, leader, and leadership. Leadership recognizes how individuals-in any type of group or organization-can bring an organization together with limited formal power, and can help an organization to grow and thrive. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SU - Term A. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.3 (4), 2.1 (4), others TBA.
  
  •  

    MBM 5568 - Integrative Perspectives on the Human Life Course


    This course examines important life experiences that impact many or all people in the course of living, including trauma, caregiving, and substance abuse. Opportunities and challenges that present in the second half of life will also be addressed, with an emphasis on life-long development and growth. The course emphasizes wellness from a mind-body-spirit perspective and approaches that enhance growth and development. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SP - Term B. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.1 (3), 1.2 (3), 3.1 (4), 3.2 (4), 3.3 (3), 3.4 (3), 6.1 (3), 6.2 (3), 6.3 (3), 8.1 (3), 8.1 (4).
  
  •  

    MBM 5569 - Consulting Skills


    The Professional Consultant in healthcare exercises a form of leadership without direct authority or control over an organization. Yet, consultants can play a critical role in mobilizing organizational resources, and inspiring a process of transformational change. Health consultants may work in major university medical centers and hospital systems, corporate medical clinics and health systems, corporate wellness credits, health insurance organizations, and small community or privately based clinics and group practices. Consultants work closely with other people who are responsible for the outcomes. Consulting can be part of any professional role such as that of a teacher, therapist, counselor, coach, or leader. A key skill is the ability to use influence and persuasion to help others get things done. A second key skill is to recognize the critical moment when a human system is ready for a change process. In effect, whenever a professional cannot or does not want to force people into action, yet needs to suggest or advocate a plan of action, the skills developed in this course will be useful. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SP - Term B. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 8.1, 8.2, 8.3, 8.4, 8.5
  
  •  

    MBM 5584 - Doctoral Level Professional Seminar in Mind-Body Medicine


    This course prepares students to embrace their professional identity as scholar-practitioners. Individuals have the opportunity to prepare for the dissertation proposal course, present their research proposal idea to peers, and critique a dissertation. In addition, they are supported through the process as they establish personal and professional goals for their work in the field of integrative healthcare. Prerequisite(s): All coursework or permission from Director of Mentoring. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered every term. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.4 (3), 2 (5), 2.4 (5), 3.1 (5), 3.4 (5), 5.2 (5), 7.2 (3), 7.3 (3).
  
  •  

    MBM 5586 - Ph.D. Practicum


    This course is structured to allow students to explore real-world situations and issues that emerge related to future practice. Students apply mind-body skills, instructional strategies, and facilitation techniques in clinical, community, and professional settings. The appropriate student-identified site allows the student to engage practicum clients in mind-body counseling and education approaches and techniques for individuals and groups. The practicum can also be set to pursue mind-body research and/or organizational development activities. Possible settings include: hospitals, clinics, counseling centers, schools, nursing homes, community centers, wellness centers, homeless shelters, group homes, jails, prisons, and corporate work places. (Note: This course requires several weeks preparation before course begins.) This course requires weekly video conference. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered every term. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.1, 1.3, 2.3, 2.4, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 4.3, 5.1, 5.2, 6.1, 7.1.
  
  •  

    MBM 5588 - MS Capstone Seminar


    This course provides students with a forum and guidance for reviewing and integrating the knowledge they have gained throughout their MS program. As final culminating essays, students will explore a question that allows them to synthesize knowledge from their completed coursework and discuss how they will utilize mind-body medicine principles in their current and future careers as scholar-practitioners. In addition, students will be asked to identify their achievements and remaining challenges in their personal and professional learning, as well as set goals for their continuing development. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered every term. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.3 (4), 1.4 (3), 3.4 (5), 7.1 (2), 7.5 (5)
  
  •  

    MBM 5593 - Advanced Coaching Practicum


    In this final skills development course in the coaching curriculum, students will engage in twelve experiential coaching sessions with 2-4 practice clients. This advanced coaching practicum provides students with the opportunity to utilize and improve their spectrum of integrative wellness coaching skills within their specific coaching niche. Students will receive weekly faculty supervision and peer coaching support via videoconference and online discussions. Prerequisite(s): 5630, (or 5628, 5629);  MBM 5632 . 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA - Term A/B. (Offering depends upon enrollment numbers.) Course Length: Course Length: 16 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.3 (5), 2.3 (4), 2.4 (5), 3.3 (4, 5), 3.4 (5), 8.1 (3), 8.2 (2).
  
  •  

    MBM 5594 - Advanced Hypnosis Practicum


    This course provides an immersion in advanced hypnotic technique and practice. Course readings and educational videos provide guidance and sample interventions utilizing hypnotic induction and therapeutic suggestion. Students engage in weekly hypnosis practice with volunteers and/or professional clients. The instructor(s) provide six videoconferences with discussion of strategies for hypnotic interventions for a variety of clinical and life problems, and supervision of the students’ practice. Students submit a video record of two hypnotic intervention sequences. Students complete a capstone essay, integrating their learning in the imagery and hypnosis course sequence, along with their learning in the advanced practicum course. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5620 , MBM 5625 . 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SP - Term B. (Offering depends upon enrollment numbers.) Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: TBA.
  
  •  

    MBM 5595 - Advanced Biofeedback Practicum


    This course includes online contact with faculty and fellow students, directed readings and research in a specialty area, as well as applied practice of biofeedback and/or neurofeedback with regular group-based supervision. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5622 , MBM 5627 . 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SP - Term B. (Offering depends upon enrollment numbers.) Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: TBA.
  
  •  

    MBM 5600 - Mind-Body Medicine: Overview


    The Mind-Body Medicine: An Overview course provides a foundational introduction to mind-body medicine and integrative health. The course reviews paradigms for health and healing implicit in mainstream medicine, humanistic psychology, complementary and integrative therapies, and traditional healing systems in non-Western cultures. The course examines scientific advances in psychoneuroimmunology, the neurosciences, and consciousness studies, with implications for mind-body healing. The course focuses on the nature of the healing process, including a review of health care practices within various cultural systems and historical eras. The course assists students to recognize the relationships among conceptual paradigms, research approaches, explanatory models for disease, and specific therapeutic interventions. Students are challenged to develop a personal vision of health and health care which emphasizes higher level wellness for self and patient, the unity of mind-body-spirit, and the active role of the patient in the healing process.
    Offered: Offered FA - Term A. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.2 (3), 1.2 (4), 1.1 (5), 2.1 (3), 2.2 (3), 2.2 (4), 3.1 (3), 3.2 (4), 5.1 (3), 7.1 (3).
  
  •  

    MBM 5611 - Therapeutic Diet and Menu Planning


    This course is an exploration of epidemiological and traditional dietary patterns and therapeutic diets, with a primary focus on scientific translation and practical application of whole foods and culinary nutrition for optimal wellness and to prevent and treat a variety of diseases and disorders. Therapeutic diets purpose, nutritional adequacy, foods encouraged, foods to avoid, meal pattern, menu planning, and functional foods will be taught from an integrative and functional and ‘food as medicine’ perspective for diverse populations. Key knowledge areas explored include food politics and policies, food security and social justice, environmental nutrition, nutrition related community action projects, commercial food production, and organic and sustainable food production. Residential conference will include culinary nutrition demonstrations. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SU - Term A. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. RC Required: No Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: TBA.
  
  •  

    MBM 5615 - Movement, Exercise, and Health


    This course reviews the critical place of physical movement and exercise in the maintenance and restoration of health. Sedentary lifestyle has been identified as a factor in the onset of many chronic diseases and conditions. Conversely, physical activity positively impacts brain chemistry, mood, and general well-being. The course explores the use of movement and exercise as a key aspect in developing self-awareness and examines the overall impact of various modalities on healthy physiology and chronic illness. Students learn strategies for using a variety of forms of movement for mental, emotional and physical renewal. The course includes an experiential component and examines yoga, tai chi or chi gong, dance, dynamic movement meditations, martial arts, and aerobic exercise as interventions for optimal health. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SP - Term A. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.2 (3), 2.1 (3), 2.1 (3), 2.2 (4), 3.1 (3), 3.2 (5), 5.1 (4), 7.1 (3).
  
  •  

    MBM 5620 - Basic Training and Education in Hypnosis


    This course provides students with a basic skill-set to conduct simple hypnotic interventions, along with knowledge about hypnotic concepts and approaches, and a familiarity with research-based applications of hypnosis to common medical and behavioral disorders. This course provides students with an introductory level of understanding helpful for engaging in hypnosis-based clinical practice and hypnosis- oriented research in integrative health. This course introduces simple trance induction protocols, trance deepening techniques, the use of post-hypnotic suggestion, and techniques to re-alert the subject and close the trance phase. In addition, the course overviews current scientific approaches to explaining hypnotic phenomena, introduces the measurement and significance of hypnotic susceptibility, and presents several of the widely used and effective approaches for utilizing hypnosis in psychotherapy and personal transformation. Students completing this basic training sequence are equipped to begin the intermediate level training. The course is designed to follow the Standards of Training in Clinical Hypnosis as presented by D. Corydon Hammond and Gary R. Elkins for the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis- Education and Research Foundation (2005). 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA - Term A. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.2 (3), 2.4 (4), 2.4 (4), 7.1 (4), 7.2 (4).
  
  •  

    MBM 5622 - Basic Training and Education in Biofeedback


    This course provides students with a basic skill-set to conduct simple biofeedback interventions, along with knowledge about biofeedback concepts and approaches, and a familiarity with research-based applications of biofeedback to common medical and behavioral disorders. This course provides students with an introductory level of understanding helpful for engaging in biofeedback-based clinical practice and psychophysiological research in integrative health. This course introduces the most commonly used biofeedback instruments, the physiological systems they measure, and the applications of these biofeedback modalities to common medical and behavioral disorders. The Saybrook biofeedback training sequence covers the Blueprint of Knowledge adopted by the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance, to guide training of biofeedback professionals (BCIA, 2006). The basic course covers the following elements of the blueprint: Orientation to Biofeedback (4 hours), Stress Coping and Illness/Models for Biofeedback Practice (4 hours), Psychophysiological Recording, part I (4 hours), surface EMG Applications, part I (4 hours), Adjunctive Interventions, part I (4 hours), and Autonomic Nervous System Applications, part I (4 hours). In addition, the course overviews current scientific approaches to research on biofeedback, and will discuss several approaches for utilizing biofeedback in psychotherapy, in optimal performance training in sports and the arts, and in personal transformation. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA - Term A. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.2 (3), 2.2 (3), 2.4 (3), 2.4 (3), 3.2 (4), 7.1 (3), 7.2 (3), 7.3 (3).
  
  •  

    MBM 5625 - Intermediate Training and Education in Hypnosis


    This course provides students with an advanced skill-set to conduct advanced hypnotic interventions, along with additional knowledge about hypnotic concepts and approaches. In addition, the student develops a sophisticated ability to learn and assess new applications of hypnosis to common medical and behavioral disorders. This course provides students with an intermediate level of understanding helpful for engaging in hypnosis-based clinical practice and hypnosis-oriented research in integrative health. This course introduces more challenging trance induction protocols, trance deepening techniques, and uses of post- hypnotic suggestion. In addition, the student learns specific approaches and techniques for a number of advanced application areas, including: 1. pain management, 2. treatment of anxiety disorders, 3. habit change protocols, 4. weight management, and 5. ego strengthening hypnotic interventions. In addition, the course reviews scientific approaches to investigating hypnotic phenomena, trains students to implement a widely accepted measure of hypnotic susceptibility, and engages the student in discussion of ethical and appropriate uses of hypnotic techniques. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5620 . 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SP - Term A. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 2.3, 2.4, 5.1, 6.1.
  
  •  

    MBM 5627 - Intermediate Training and Education in Biofeedback


    This course provides students with more advanced skills to conduct effective higher-level biofeedback interventions, along with additional knowledge about biofeedback concepts and approaches, and a more solid grounding in research on biofeedback. The knowledge and skills included in the Saybrook biofeedback training sequence follow the “Blueprint of Knowledge” developed by the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance to guide training of biofeedback professionals (BCIA, 2006). The Intermediate level course covers the remainder of the BCIA Blueprint of Knowledge, including: 1) psychophysiological recording, advanced (4 hours), 2) surface electromyography and its applications, part II (4 hours), 3) autonomic nervous system biofeedback and its applications, part II (4 hours), 4) EEG applications (4 hours), 5) adjunctive interventions, part II (4 hours), and 6) professional conduct (4 hours). In this course, students complete 24 hours of basic didactic education and 6 hours of clinical mentoring qualifying toward eventual certification in general biofeedback by the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance (BCIA). Prerequisite(s): MBM 5622 . 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SP - Term A. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.3, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 3.1, 7.1, 7.3.
  
  •  

    MBM 5629 - Evidence-Based Competencies and Skills for Coaching


    This course provides students with an extensive overview of the foundational coaching competencies and skills as defined by the International Coach Federation (ICF) and Board Certified Coach (BCC) organizations. The coaching skills and competencies learned in this class can be applied to diverse contexts such as integrative health and wellness, leadership and business, and life coaching. In addition, students will gain a deeper understanding of the theories and evidence-based practices underlying various coaching approaches. This course will also provide students with basic level knowledge and skill development in group coaching and facilitation. Students who complete this course will be prepared to utilize and apply their coaching and facilitation skills within their chosen profession. This is a highly interactive and experiential class. This course will also provide those students interested in deepening their coaching skill set with a solid foundation to prepare them for more advanced courses in coaching. [Note this is equivalent course to MBM 5630 Coaching for Health and Wellness and MBM 5631 - Coaching for Health and Wellness - Dietary and Nutritional Coaching ] 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SP - Term A. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.4 (3), 2.1 (3), 2.3 (4), 2.4 (3), 3.2 (4), 3.3 (5), 5.1 (3), 5.2 (2), 7.1 (3).
  
  •  

    MBM 5631 - Coaching for Health and Wellness - Dietary and Nutritional Coaching


    This course provides students with an extensive overview of the foundational coaching competencies and skills as defined by the International Coach Federation (ICF) and Board Certified Coach (BCC) organizations. The coaching skills and competencies learned in this class can be applied to diverse contexts such as integrative health and wellness, leadership and business, and life coaching. In addition, students will gain a deeper understanding of the theories and evidence-based practices underlying various coaching approaches. This course will also provide students with basic level knowledge and skill development in group coaching and facilitation. Students who complete this course will be prepared to utilize and apply their coaching and facilitation skills within their chosen profession. This is a highly interactive and experiential class. This course will also provide those students interested in deepening their coaching skill set with a solid foundation to prepare them for more advanced courses in coaching. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SP - Term A. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.4 (3), 2.1 (3), 2.3 (4), 2.4 (3), 3.2 (4), 3.3 (5), 5.1 (3), 5.2 (2), 7.1 (3).
  
  •  

    MBM 5632 - Intermediate Health and Wellness Coaching


    This intermediate level coaching course is designed to strengthen the core coaching competencies taught in the foundational MBM 5628  Evidence-Based Coaching course. In addition, students will be introduced to intermediate and advanced coaching skills such as process coaching and mind-body approaches that are relevant for integrative wellness coaching. Students will continue to deepen their knowledge and understanding of integrative wellness coaching, as well as strengthen their ability to self-coach and practice personal self-care. Students will also be required to assess a specific coaching niche within an identified setting to include medical, community health and wellness, private practice, corporate wellness, or executive coaching. The information from this assessment will be used in future coursework to develop a coaching implementation plan and to recruit practice coaching participants for the Advanced Coaching PracticumThis Prerequisite(s): MBM 5629  or 5630. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SU - Term A. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 4.1 (4), 4.2 (4), 5.1 (4), 5.2 (4), 5.3 (4), 5.4 (4), 6.1 (3), 6.2 (3), 6.3 (3), 6.4 (3), 7.1 (3), 7.2 (3), 7.3 (3), 7.4 (3), 8.1 (3), 8.2 (3), 8.3 (3), 8.4 (3), 9.1 (3), 9.2 (3) , 10.1 (4), 10.2 (4), 10.3 (4), 10.4 (4)
  
  •  

    MBM 5633 - MA in Integrative Wellness Coaching Capstone Seminar


    This is the final course in the Integrative Wellness Coaching master’s curriculum, providing students with the opportunity to integrate their learning throughout the degree program. Students will complete a capstone essay summarizing their learning experiences in this program, and formulate their professional approach to integrative wellness coaching and health promotion. Students will also develop and present a strategic marketing and business plan that describes the evidence-based coaching approach or program that they intend to implement within their respective professional niche. This pragmatic orientation to business planning will help students explore key issues and answer important questions related to their future practice in integrative wellness coaching and health promotion. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered every term. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: TBA.
  
  •  

    MBM 5635 - Spirituality and Health


    This course covers the principles of spiritual practices, ceremony and ritual in healing for Mind-Body Medicine Practitioners. We explore the clinical implications of research on spirituality and examine how the spiritual potential of mind-body medicine has been demonstrated in clinical practice. We consider how practitioners can be therapeutic with clients/patients from disparate belief systems. We study indigenous healing from Native America, Africa, India and the Caribbean as well as pagan approaches to healing. Students learn the emotional, spiritual and physical health benefits of spiritual practices as well as the therapeutic skills necessary to integrate spirituality into clinical practice. Students intellectually study and experientially practice several spiritual techniques and create ritual and ceremony to assist them in becoming effective integrative Mind-Body Medicine practitioners. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA - Term A, SU Term A. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.2 (3), 2.1 (2), 2.2 (3), 2.4 (3), 3.1 (3), 3.2 (3), 5.2 (3), 5.3 (3), 6.1 (3).
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5