Javascript is currently not supported, or is disabled by this browser. Please enable Javascript for full functionality.

Skip to Main Content
   
2017-2018 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook with Summer Addendum
Saybrook University
   
 
  Feb 16, 2020
 
2017-2018 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook with Summer Addendum 
    
2017-2018 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook with Summer Addendum [Archived Catalog]

Course Descriptions


Courses are identified and organized by degree program. Listed below are those courses that may be offered through the Department of Humanistic & Clinical Psychology for the Psychology degree program as well as the Human Science degree program for the 2015-2016 academic school year. CampusVue will list courses open for enrollment each semester, by Section if applicable.

Courses are identified and organized by degree programs: Clinical Psychology, PhD. Courses listed are offered as online cohort (CO), residential (R), or individually-mentored online (IO). Not all courses are offered every semester. See Program Descriptions and Requirements section of the College of Social Sciences section of this catalog and the Saybrook University website for updates and/or changes to courses.

 

Seattle Counseling

  
  •  

    SCO 5064 - Group Therapy


    Studies of theoretical and experiential understandings of group purpose, development, dynamics, counseling theories and methods. Theoretical and practical emphasis on group process, interpersonal dynamics in the group, and the development of group leadership competencies based on both interpersonal skills and an awareness of depth psychology and group process. 2 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5065 - Counseling Theory


    Studies of basic theories, principles and techniques of counseling and their application to professional counseling settings. Attention particularly given to the systems approach and models of therapy based on the systems paradigm. Review of the “common factors” of different counseling models also examined. 2 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5066 - The Helping Relationship


    Studies that provide an understanding of counseling/consultant characteristics that influence the helping process (age, gender, ethnic factors, etc.); essential interviewing and counseling skills for developing a therapeutic relationship, set goals, maintain boundaries, evaluate client outcome and termination. Focus on the basic intrapersonal and interpersonal skills of facilitating an effective and safe relational conversation in therapy. 2 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5067 - The Self of the Therapist I


    There has been a considerable emphasis on the “self of the therapist.” This course examines the conventional process of counter-transference in therapy, highlighting the importance of studying one’s family of origin history. The primary focus of this course is on the interpersonal relationship between the therapist and the client-the competencies, process, skills critical in helping therapy move effectively toward a good outcome. Dealing with resistant clients and other therapeutic challenges are examined. This course is conducted at every residential conference through the two years. 1 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5068 - Group Leadership I


    This course emphasizes the leadership skills and competencies of the group leader. A review of core group membership skills and frameworks for understanding group process and development are also emphasized. Developing general competencies of interpersonal behavior in group members is considered a core developmental challenge. 1 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5069 - Human Growth, Development, and the Family Life Cycle


    Studies that provide an understanding of the nature and needs of individuals at all developmental levels, from birth to old age. Different developmental models are reviewed with an emphasis on development within the family life cycle. Stresses the complex developmental relationships among individuals in the family. Individually oriented content adapted to a systems paradigm. Stress on the life-cycle of the family and its modifications over time (first child, adolescent sexual development, leaving home, etc.) The clinical implications of using developmental models in treatment planning are emphasized. 2 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5070 - Couple and Family Therapy-Theory I


    This is the first of three clinical theory courses in the “clinical sequence” which includes both theory courses and technique courses focusing on the application of theory in clinical practice with individuals, couples, and families. The three “theory” sections in the clinical sequence review primary models in clinical practice such as cognitive behavior therapy, solution focused therapy, narrative therapy, Bowen therapy, contextual therapy, structural therapy, experiential symbolic therapy, psychoanalytic therapy, and other models. The underlying systemic paradigm shapes the thinking and practice of all the models presented. 2 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5071 - Couple and Family Therapy-Technique I


    This is the first of three clinical “technique” courses in the “clinical sequence” which includes both theory and technique courses. In the “technique” courses, the models discussed in the theory sections are examined for the clinical principles and techniques associated with each of the models. Multiple practica are used to practice the models in working with individuals, couples, and families with all age groups-children, adolescents, and adults-and with a variety of developmental and clinical challenges. The link between assessment and interventions is utilized in designing treatment strategies. 2 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5072 - Professional Ethics and Law


    Studies of the following aspects of professional functioning: history and philosophy of the counseling profession; professional roles and relationships with other human service providers, credentialing, advocacy processes, ethical and legal considerations in professional Counseling. Emphasis will be placed on the fundamental ethics and laws governing clinical practice, including some of the new developments in technology and its use in clinical practice. 2 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5073 - The Self of the Therapist II


    There has been a considerable emphasis on the “self of the therapist.” This course examines the conventional process of counter-transference in therapy, highlighting the importance of studying one’s family of origin history. The primary focus of this course is on the interpersonal relationship between the therapist and the client-the competencies, process, skills critical in helping therapy move effectively toward a good outcome. Dealing with resistant clients and other therapeutic challenges are examined. This course is conducted at every residential conference through the two years. 1 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5074 - Social and Cultural Diversity II


    Studies that provide an understanding of the cultural context of relationships, issues and trends in a diverse society. Includes such factors as culture, ethnicity, nationality, age, gender, sexual orientation, mental and physical characteristics, family values, education, religious and spiritual values, socio-economics status, etc. 1 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5075 - Psychopathology


    This course briefly reviews the history of mental illness as described across time and different social contexts. Attention is given to the major classifications of mental illness, diagnostic criteria, differential diagnoses, and controversies around the use of diagnostic classifications. The use of the DSM is explained with brief training on how to use the DSM in clinical practice. A systemic paradigm is used to help elucidate a multi-modal approach in assessing individuals within a social and familial context. 2 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5076 - Research Methods and Statistics


    Studies that provide an understanding of research methods, statistical analysis, needs assessment and program evaluation. Research methodology and data analysis, computer research skills, critical evaluation of professional research reports, with emphasis on research relevant to clinical practice. 2 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5077 - Diagnosis and Assessment of Individuals


    Studies that provide an understanding of individual & group approaches to assessment and evaluation (standardized and non-standardized testing, performance assessment, individual and group test and inventory methods, etc.). 2 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5078 - Couple and Family Therapy-Theory II


    The emphasis in this section is on models of therapy that expand the repertoire of therapeutic models from Theory I with a particular emphasis on the “self of the therapist.” Given that the relationship system between therapist and client is the most critical “instrument of change,” the therapist’s mindfulness about the self, including family of origin history, countertransference, differentiation and attunement, etc. all constitute an effective and present “therapeutic self.” The models reviewed in this course include Bowen Therapy, Jungian Therapy, Contextual Therapy, and Group Leadership Theory, and Strategic Therapy. The link between assessment and interventions is utilized in designing treatment strategies. 2 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5079 - Couple and Family Therapy-Technique II


    This “technique” section includes a series of practica focusing on work with individuals, couples, and families including children, adolescents, and adults. The practica will integrate the therapeutic models from “Theory I” and “Theory II” in a variety of clinical enactments using a small group format with feedback from student colleagues and faculty. The standard clinical skills of joining, assessment, clinical conceptualization, treatment planning, interventions and feedback, measuring progress, adjusting the clinical focus, and so on will be emphasized using a systemic model that includes both an intrapsychic and interpersonal dimension. 2 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5080 - The Self of the Therapist III


    There has been a considerable emphasis on the “self of the therapist.” This course examines the conventional process of counter-transference in therapy, highlighting the importance of studying one’s family of origin history. The primary focus of this course is on the interpersonal relationship between the therapist and the client-the competencies, process, skills critical in helping therapy move effectively toward a good outcome. Dealing with resistant clients and other therapeutic challenges are examined. This course is conducted at every residential conference through the two years. 1 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5081 - Group Leadership II


    This course emphasizes the leadership skills and competencies of the group leader. A review of core group membership skills and frameworks for understanding group process and development are also emphasized. Developing general competencies of interpersonal behavior in group members is considered a core developmental challenge. 1 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5082 - Professional Seminar I


    Development of a professional attitude and identity. Studies of professional socialization and the role of professional organizations; licensure; legal responsibilities and liabilities of clinical practice and research; family law; confidentiality issues, codes of ethics, etc. This seminar complements the clinical practicum as students present clinical cases in a case presentation format along with videotape examples. Feedback on these cases is provided by both faculty and students in a small group format. 1 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5083 - Counseling Practicum I


    Direct client contact hours, supervision, staff meetings, community relations, record keeping, supervised in-house practica and off-campus site placement. 5 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5084 - Couple and Family Therapy-Theory III


    This is the third of three clinical theory courses in the “clinical sequence” which includes both theory courses and technique courses focusing on the application of theory in clinical practice with individuals, couples, and families. The three “theory” sections in the clinical sequence review primary therapeutic models in clinical practice. The models reviewed in this course include Somatic Therapies, Experiential Symbolic Therapy, Neurobiological Models, Models of Crisis and Suicide Intervention, and The Common Factors in Therapy. The underlying systemic paradigm shapes the thinking and practice of all the models presented. 2 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5085 - Couple and Family Therapy-Technique III


    This course integrates the therapeutic models, application techniques, and ethics and laws taught in the program. Students develop and report on their own therapeutic models and clinical applications with specific examples. Students are assessed on their Clinical Theory papers and their application skills. The integration emphasis continues in the Clinical Orals where the focus is on clinical vignettes that highlight the link between theory, application, clinical intervention, ethics, and laws. The emphasis in this course is the overall integration of theory, practice, and specific clinical skills with attention to the diverse methods of integration within the student population. 2 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5086 - Human Sexuality


    The study of human sexuality reviews sexual development using a multi-cultural, diverse perspective. Sexual behavior is examined from the perspective of the therapist including methods of assessment, how to conduct conversations focused on sexuality, and how to identify sexual dysfunction with possible referral sources. 2 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5087 - The Self of the Therapist IV


    There has been a considerable emphasis on the “self of the therapist.” This course examines the conventional process of counter-transference in therapy, highlighting the importance of studying one’s family of origin history. The primary focus of this course is on the interpersonal relationship between the therapist and the client-the competencies, process, skills critical in helping therapy move effectively toward a good outcome. Dealing with resistant clients and other therapeutic challenges are examined. This course is conducted at every residential conference through the two years. 1 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5088 - Social and Cultural Diversity II


    Studies that provide an understanding of the cultural context of relationships, issues and trends in a diverse society. Includes such factors as culture, ethnicity, nationality, age, gender, sexual orientation, mental and physical characteristics, family values, education, religious and spiritual values, socio-economics status, etc. 1 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5089 - Professional Seminar II


    Development of a professional attitude and identity. Studies of professional socialization and the role of professional organizations; licensure; legal responsibilities and liabilities of clinical practice and research; family law; confidentiality issues, codes of ethics, etc. This seminar complements the clinical practicum as students present clinical cases in a case presentation format along with videotape examples. Feedback on these cases is provided by both faculty and students in a small group format. 1 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5090 - Counseling Practicum II


    Direct client contact hours, supervision, staff meetings, community relations, record keeping, supervised in-house practica and off-campus site placement. 5 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SCO 5098 - The Integrated Therapist: Tending the Body, Mind, Heart, and Spirit of Psychotherapy


    This one credit class will provide an opportunity for the developing practitioner to deepen their commitment to tending the “Self of the Therapist” through an integrative exploration that includes somatic, collaborative, and depth explorations and clinical application. 1 credit(s)

Seattle Leadership Program

  
  •  

    SLO 5221 - Adaptive Leadership: Theory & Practice


    The course prepares students to address “wicked problems” that simultaneously involve “system-process” issues and “cultural” issues. This course introduces students to systemic perspective, basics of emotional intelligence (self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship management), organizational justice, character (Authentic Presence), and development (lifelong learning, developing others). 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SLO 5222 - Systems Thinking: Theory & Application


    This course introduces students to critical thinking (reflective analysis practice), systems theory, family systems theory, consulting theory, and organizational systems coaching. The systems thinking skills that are introduced are: developing a relational perspective (interconnectedness) including layered, nested and embedded systems views; cognitive agility with non-reductionist thinking approaches; performing contextual analyses; cognitive agility with nonlinear modeling relationships and feedback loops, stocks, and flows; prototyping and progressive approximation; emergent properties and strange attractors; and cognitive agility with self-organizing dynamics and structures. An outcome of this course will be the ability to exercise agile thinking - processing, integrating information that emerges out of complex dynamics and relationships. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SLO 5223 - Leadership Psychology I: Group Membership & Cultural Intelligence


    This course focuses on the development of personal mastery in terms of emotional-social skills and competencies. These skills include self-awareness, relational attunement, helping skills, conflict management, and relational process work. Students learn how to develop interventions that optimize the effectiveness of interpersonal interactions, and how to work with power, authority, and influence issues. This course includes the examination of the emergence and fluidity of leadership roles and the psychological dynamics between leaders and leaders, leaders and followers, and followers and followers. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SLO 5224 - Optimizing Innovation I: Lean Theories, Tools and Practices


    Lean theories, tools and practices have proven to be a highly effective performance optimization approach across multiple industry sectors by providing organizations a data-driven, disciplined approach to reducing waste and minimizing defects as means of being responsive to market disruptions and the drive towards greater innovation and productivity. This course teaches students how to apply Lean as a practice of continuous identification and elimination of waste in planning, design, and operations while increasing innovation and overall productivity and end-to-end product and service quality. This course focuses on learning the Lean theories, tools and practices and uses the context of innovation to develop competencies in designing and implementing performance optimization interventions using Lean Thinking, Lean Production, Value Streams, and Gemba Kaizen. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SLO 5225 - Research Informatics I: Theory & Methods


    An essential skill for moving organizations towards meeting their goals is the ability to effectively analyze and take wise action based on financial, technological, and socio-cultural data/information. This course introduces students to the theory and methodologies behind research methods, statistics, and business informatics. The course focuses on the acquisition of research competence to search and circumscribe the subject domain for human inquiry; define the research focus; formulate researchable questions; know the relevant methodological traditions to select one suitable to the question; design and plan the research study; know the procedures proposed for data collection, analysis, and synthesis; know the ethical issues of proposed research; critique research; critically review literature and propose research. This focus includes defining and articulating information needs, identifying and selecting the appropriate resources, formatting and executing research strategies, and then critically interpreting and analyzing the result and presenting it in a professional (APA) style. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SLO 5226 - Organization Development I: Strategic Leadership, Change Management & Cross-Functional Teaming


    Essential skills for moving organizations towards meeting their goals are strategic leadership, leading change, and cross-functional teaming. Students explore strategic leadership as the theories and skills of forming and implementing an organization’s vision, goals, strategies, and structure. A critical task of leadership is to assess the strategic environment of the organization so that a future direction may be charted that will enable it to achieve significant competitive advantage in the marketplace. Students are taught to develop visions, missions, core values and strategic goals that allow their own leadership intentions to be realized. They implement and operate a “B-Corp” for the majority of their second year. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SLO 5227 - Leadership Psychology II - Authentic Leadership & Cultural Intelligence


    This course focuses on the development of personal mastery in terms of cultural skills and competencies. The primary skill is the ability to simultaneously hold and examine multiple perspectives. This skill is refined through the examination of Family-Of-Origin (FOO) and Cultures-Of-Origin (COO) experiences and issues, and is used as an entry point to developing greater self-awareness, sympathy, empathy and compassion for oneself and others. Students learn how to work with implicit narrative methods to bring clarity to thoughts and feelings that are not voiced but implicit in actions and behavior. The methods work with undeclared stances and the beliefs, values, or stories that are implicit in how they experience, react and respond to certain situations. Students learn how to function effectively in multi-cultural situations including contexts as diverse as spiritual beliefs, gender, physical abilities and attributes, ethnicity, income, sexuality, race, age, class, leadership experience, organizational acculturation, education, etc. This course includes learning processes for identifying and navigating cultural protocols. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SLO 5228 - Optimizing Innovation II: Innovation Practicum


    This course is designed to enhance the student’s learning experience through in-depth reflection and application of Lean theories, tools, and practices and focused on innovation in the work environment. The course provides students with professional and academic hands-on experience in an integration laboratory context. Students explore important issues involved with applying Lean to increase innovation within the planning, development and implementation processes. Students experience people, technology, process and information in the context of effective Lean practices. Particular emphasis will be placed on the integration of leadership competencies (emotional, social, cultural, and cognitive intelligences) and Lean theories, tools, and practices demonstrated in the context of optimizing innovation. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SLO 5229 - Research Informatics II: Statistics & Informatics Practicum


    This Research Informatics Practicum course is designed to enhance the student’s learning experience through in-depth reflection and application of research, statistics, and informatics theories, tools, and practices focused on eldership competency and performance optimization. The course provides students with professional and academic hands-on experience in an integration laboratory context. Students explore important issues involved with applying research, statistics, and informatics to increase leadership effective. organizational leadership capacity. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SLO 5230 - Organization Development II: Organization Development: Executive Coaching and Training & Facilitation


    An essential skill for moving organizations towards meeting their goals is coaching executives/leaders to increase their effectiveness in working with their teams. In this course the phases of coaching are discussed and practiced, including contracting, assisting executives/leaders in setting goals for business improvement, team effectiveness and personal growth, and preparation of the leader for “live-action” coaching. The importance of identifying systemic patterns of behavior is emphasized throughout all phases of the coaching and consulting process. ICF Core Competencies are integrated into the phases of coaching. Students also learn the fundamentals of conducting successful trainings and meetings, including the identification of desired outcomes, the creation of appropriate designs, the delivery of effective presentations, and leading productive meetings. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SLO 5231 - Leadership Psychology III - Group Leadership, Organizational Trauma, & Conflict Management


    This course focuses on the development of personal and organizational mastery in terms of skills and competencies to address ethics and organization trauma. These skills include moral compass and ethical discernment; and the ability to recognize and acknowledge trauma; develop emotionally safe relational containers for addressing trauma and the underlying anxiety and fears; examine the underlying mental models and emotional triggers, and determine appropriate interpersonal and organizational interventions. This course includes use of survey feedback assessment processes. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    SLO 5232 - Leadership Mastery Capstone Projects: Training & Facilitation, Research Presentation, and Practitioner Theory


    This course provides students with opportunities to demonstrate their leadership mastery and refine their leadership competencies. Students design and implement a professional capstone training and facilitation event that is focused on leadership and performance optimization along with a capstone education conference that is focused on group leadership, performance optimization, and sustainability through a Triple Bottom Line strategy and operations. The final capstone project is participation in a Practitioner Theory Seminar to deliver the results of their own practitioner theory research project in the form of a paper and presentation. The course includes an oral exam. 6 credit(s)

Transformative Social Change

  
  •  

    TSC 3220 - African Diaspora: African American Cultural History & Psychology


    This first in a sequence of courses on the African Diaspora will focus on the definition, constituents, and historiography of the African Diaspora and greater comprehension of the cultural history and psychology of persons with African ancestry, through the lens of African and African-American psychology. Selected texts for the course have been written by African, African-Caribbean, and African-American scholars. The methodological approach to the study of the African Diaspora is interdisciplinary and draws to the foreground historiography, depth psychology, economics of capitalism, law, mythology, religion, art history, and anthropology for construction of an ancestral ethno-cultural narrative of the African Diaspora against the background of world cultural history. The course content and approach should open and cultivate, through critical thinking, a worldview and means to deconstruct, analyze, comprehend, and reconstruct complex sets of human relations in the African Diaspora from global, regional, national, and personal perspectives. It should allow us to see how the archetype of culture is actualized within institutions, living micro-systems, and psychodynamics of the Diaspora. The specific focus of this course is on African-American cultural history, psychology, and experience from origins in Africa, the Middle Passage, bondage, civil and psychological reconstruction, the Civil Rights movement, Pan-Africanism, and Negritude in America, Europe, the Caribbean, and Africa, Affirmative Action, African-American family life, demographics, health/mental health, illness, spirituality, resilience, and optimal development. Cross-listed with PSY3220, EHTP3220. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 4020 - Relationships in Health and Healing Practice


    This course reviews evidence on the importance of relationships in the maintenance of health, prevention of illness, and healing. The major focus is upon the ties between people; however, relationships exist at many levels including links of mental to physical processes, broader ecological or spiritual domains, and socio-cultural beliefs and practices. Evidence is provided for the use of caring relationships in the healing process. The format includes written reports and participatory activities. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 6400 - Ethics for Transformative Social Change: Thinking Like a Global Citizen


    The practice of ethics involves the exploration and evaluation of different values and assumptions that support alternative courses of action. This course approaches these differences from a global civic perspective that is grounded in our common humanity and recognizes our many social differences. We will practice “thinking like a global citizen” in an evaluation of the merits of a capabilities approach to human development, comparing a property-based economy with a civic-based economic vision. We will also critically examine a number of practices that address challenges that are of particular interest to participants in the course, which might include immigration, complicity in the violation of human rights, the protection of the commons, and alternative views of global finance. In these examinations, we will explore and generate potential designs for a sustainable and just framework for transformative actions on the local, regional, national, and international level. A primary goal of the course is for students to be able develop a global civic ethic that is sufficiently rigorous to face ongoing resistance to social change and flexible enough to enable relevant and effective actions to address the multiple dimensions of our global civic life. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 6500 - Ecological Psychology


    Humans endanger species, ecosystems, and themselves by altering, depleting, and poisoning our planet. Students of sustainability, social transformation, organizational leadership, psychotherapy, consciousness, and spirituality may benefit from developing an ecopsychological perspective. The course should serve all students concerned with how humans created the current environmental crisis and how to resolve it. The course should also be helpful to clinicians whose clients are physically and emotionally harmed by their absence of connection to their life supporting habitats, and whose behavior toward the environment adds to human suffering and to business managers intending to become more effective green leaders. Finally, the course should be useful for advocates for animals, for wildlife, environmental preservation and low impact lifestyles and local community productivity by introducing key concepts about human nature and the human capacity to influence the environmental crisis. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 6505 - Healthy Communities


    This course will provide students with an overview of the concepts, practice, and research in the area of Healthy Communities. The beginnings of the healthy communities’ movement took place in mid 1980s when Leonard Duhl’s concept of holistic health promotion and illness prevention captured the imagination of World Health Organization (WHO) officials. As a result of WHO initiatives, the WHO healthy communities program is now ongoing in 36 cities in Europe, between 60 and 70 cities in Canada and several in the United States. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 6510 - Theory and Practice of Nonviolence


    This course examines the history and basic principles of a variety of nonviolent approaches, including those of seminal figures such as Buddha, Jesus, Gandhi, and King, as well as the views of contemporary social activists and theorists, both secular and spiritual. The applications of philosophies of nonviolence to various social and political domains are critically considered. A range of methods and strategies for nonviolent social change are explored, utilizing study of historical and recent cases. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 6520 - Gender and Society


    This course reviews theoretical insights regarding gender from disciplines including gender studies, sociology, psychology, and international relations to consider the significance of gender as a category of social analysis. Particular attention will be given to how gender structures personal identities, families, work contexts as well as institutions such as public education and the military. Additionally, students will consider how developing a critical understanding of gender can help them in their role as change agents within their relationships, communities, workplaces, and in broader society. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 6530 - Social Impact Media: Stories for Change


    The aim of this course is to empower students to analyze and deconstruct media narratives and to recognize their use of visual and aural language constructs to develop and elicit empathy from the viewer. Students will critically analyze the cultural and societal influences on narrative and the importance of story to unite cultures and trigger social change.  Students will apply this critical awareness to distinguish and classify storytelling strategies as they connect to specific kinds of subject matter, approach, types of media, and expected goals or outcomes. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 6535 - Social Media and Theories of Social Change


    The goal of this course is develop the student’s critical analysis skills as applied to the impact of social communications on social change globally. Students will examine particular social movements and their development as intersected by social media. Issues of truth, accuracy and empathy will be explored in the process of deconstructing assumptions regarding social media and its influence on groups and its ability to trigger social change. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 6540 - Impact Analysis: Developing the Tools for Impact


    This aim of this course is to empower students to be able to critically evaluate research tools of socio and behavioral measurement, and to apply these toolsets and technologies to the analysis of specific impact outreach campaigns. Through coursework students will develop the ability to differentiate the tools of impact analysis, compare quantitative vs. qualitative techniques, and apply their strategies to real-world outreach campaigns. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 6545 - SIM Production Knowing the Tools, Distinguishing the Purpose


    The aim of this course is to empower students to see themselves as social change agents through the construction of personal stories in media. In this course students will demonstrate competency in skills required to construct stories in various forms of media, to determine the appropriate form and distribution strategy, and to create strong narratives illuminating relevant social causes through personal story. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 6550 - Conflict Resolution Theory and Methods


    The major themes and debates within the field of conflict resolution are discussed in this course. Students gain an understanding of the tools that are available to intervene in conflicts and an awareness of how to improve their capacity to analyze and resourcefully respond to conflict. Additionally, students develop a critical theoretical perspective on the general field of conflict resolution. This class assists the scholar/practitioner in addressing major challenges that call for creative formulation. Such new perspectives may enable the student to be a more effective agent of change, and the field to address the prevention of violent and destructive conflict as well as the resolution of specific disputes. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 6555 - Creating Outreach Campaigns for Social Impact Media


    The aim of this course is to deepen understanding and engagement around the role film and narrative can play in advancing social change. Students will explore the differences between film distribution and impact, what it means to design and manage outreach campaigns, the role of an “impact producer” in this, and the various forms of social change that are possible with film. At the completion of the course, students will be able to discern the impact potential of different narrative forms and connect them to broader opportunities for social change. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 6560 - Approaches to Socially Engaged Spirituality


    In the modern Western world, spirituality is often understood as private, subjective, and individual, as one’s primarily inward communion with what is seen as sacred, a communion that is not necessarily explicitly in relation to, or even connected with, one’s more outward and public life. In many traditional religious forms, the highest development of spirituality required leaving and having little to do with the everyday social world, whether as a monk or nun, hermit, wanderer, or a member of an intentional community. Socially engaged spirituality in its traditional and contemporary forms represents a different approach, in which spiritual qualities are developed in the context of involvement in family, work, community, society, and/or politics. Cross-listed CSIH 6560   3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 6565 - Multiplatform Journalism: Evolving Models of News Creation


    This course is focused on empowering a student to critically discern and differentiate forms of digital journalism from traditional journalism and documentary form, and to apply this analysis to the creation of short media pieces aimed at social issues. Students will deepen their knowledge of the history of journalism, the evolution of contemporary approaches, the challenges and opportunities within the current digital media ecosystem, better preparing them for roles as producers of dynamic forms of media. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 6570 - Race, Class, and Gender


    None of us lives our lives through linear or exclusive experiences of race, class, or gender. Instead, we exist through multiplicities of identity that are informed through race, class, and gender, as well as other social determinants. Human diversity, increasingly framed in terms of intersectionality - focused on the mutual interrelatedness of central social categorizations such as gender, ethnicity/race, social class and sexualit(ies) - is becoming more prominent in research, scholarship, and practice. The goal for this course is modest - to expand our awareness of how race, class, and gender shape our lives, historically and in the present day. If this heightened awareness leads to changes in the way we talk with and about each other, represent the other, provide services, and live our lives on a day-to-day basis, then the course will have more than satisfied its intent. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 6585 - The Human Right to Adequate Food


    Ending hunger is a deeply political issue, involving the play of power and conflicting interests. It must involve much more than the delivery of particular goods or services. It requires recognition and respect for human rights, and it may require some sort of reconfiguration of the social order, locally, nationally, and globally. Ending hunger requires serious planning, and agreement on a guiding vision. This course is designed to help participants figure out how to do that, in the contexts that interest us. This course is offered in a cooperative arrangement with the University of Sydney in Australia. The course utilizes the University of Sydney’s Blackboard online learning platform. Saybrook students enrolled in the course participate in the course together with students from the University of Sydney Peace and Conflict Studies Program. Unlike other Saybrook courses, the term of this course is twelve weeks. Students register for the course as they usually do, and will receive course log-in information directly from the instructor. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 6590 - Peace Studies


    This course reviews theory and data from psychology and other human sciences in the study of peace, conflict, and violence. It covers both positive (harmonious and constructive ways of living) and negative (absence of war or violent conflict) conceptualizations of peace at the interpersonal, group, national and international levels. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 6592 - Immigration and Social Justice


    This course seeks to provide historical context to current debates over immigration reform, integration, and citizenship.  The course will cover the historical and systemic context for understanding contemporary immigration politics, including xenophobia, immigration and citizenship policy debates, and border issues. The course will explore the current experiences and needs of refugees, including the intersection of immigration policy with issues of race, and gender inequality and discrimination. Finally, the course will evaluate policy and advocacy options that provide humane, just and sustainable approaches to immigration.

      3 credit(s)

  
  •  

    TSC 6594 - Peacebuilding


    The field and practice of peacebuilding utilizes nonviolent tactics to transform social conflict and to build cultures of peace.  In this course, students will survey a range of roles and domains within the field of peacebuilding, including how peacebuilding is utilized in international post-conflict contexts, and how countries and communities which have experienced deep social conflict can benefit from peacebuilding. Students will also consider how peacebuilding can address structural violence and how innovative arts-based praxis can deepen peacebuilding efforts. The course will also explore the reflective practitioner skills and characteristics that are necessary to design, assess, and impact transformation in unpredictable conflict contexts.
      3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 6610 - Social System Transformation Theory


    The aim of this course is to empower students to be able to critically evaluate social systems and become participants in their co-creation and transformation. The course enables students to recognize and analyze social systems and societal paradigms as they present themselves in various domains of human experience, develop a critical understanding of how humanistic values, developmental ideas and norms can be applied to social systems, and develop the ability to create strategies for changes in such systems and norms so that they will improve the well-being of the people who participate in them. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 6615 - Overview of Transformative Social Change Interventions


    To change the world (or some small part of it) people need to take action. However, what are the most appropriate ways to take effective action? This course is designed to introduce students to the strategies, tactics, and methods used to promote transformative social change. Students will learn how to launch a project, non-profit organization, or movement, conduct successful meetings and build consensus, develop a strategy and tactics, take effective action, and maintain the change while nurturing his or her well-being. This course will provide students with a broad overview of how to bring about transformative change in social systems on a variety of levels. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 6620 - Psychology of Disability, Rehabilitation, and Empowerment


    This course is designed to introduce the student to both (1) an understanding of how the community-at-large conceptualizes the role of persons with disabilities due to illness, trauma, and environmental impact (malnutrition, wars, etc.) and how that has transformed over the years given disability rights advocacy and legislation, particularly in the United States; (2) issues in treating the individual with disabilities and the differences and similarities in working with other individuals in treatment; and (3) voices of persons with disabilities and their narratives. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 7077 - Building Sustainability: The Global Crisis


    Sustainability is defined as living in such a way that the capacity of future generations to meet their own needs is preserved. However, current patterns of human life are exhausting and destroying the gifts of nature that are necessary for life. To achieve sustainability, humans must refrain from depleting non-renewable resources and from polluting air, soil, and water. We must control both population and consumption and will likely need to end the extremes of wealth and poverty that are currently proving destructive to our habitats. Finally, sustainability will, we believe, require major changes in social institutions and in the way humans think and act toward each other and toward the earth. The pace at which we make these changes will determine how much of earth’s resources are left for generations yet to come. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 7079 - Building Sustainability: Present Practices in Community and Society


    This course explores principles, implementation, and effectiveness of selected current sustainability approaches. It provides an overview of key perspectives on sustainability: The Natural Step, Natural Capitalism, renewable energy, green building, sustainable agriculture, and population control. This course introduces information about present practices relevant to many disciplines and social domains and provides a broad base on which to build further studies and real-world projects. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 7085 - Globalism and Power


    This course describes different manifestations of globalization and identifies the powerful forces directing them, the costs and benefits that come with it, the evolving role of transnational groups, global NGOs, and the opportunities to find personal meaning and local purpose in a global society. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 7115 - Refugee Trauma and Resiliency


    This course covers the breath of topics (i.e., mental health, human resiliency, human rights, humanitarian aid) related to working with displaced people (refugees, asylum seekers, exiled individuals and internally displaced people). It is designed as a survey course for students interested in understanding the landscape with regards to research and practice for the protection and assistance of refugees. This course is useful for the more experienced student who desires to develop an independent project or dissertation work based on one of the areas of concern presented in the course. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 8151 - Practicum in Professional Practice


    This course is intended for students seeking practicum training not related to clinical practicum or the MFT program. Students are responsible for arranging the practicum and should consult their Specialization director in order to identify a Saybrook faculty liaison. Prerequisite(s): Open only to students pursuing a TSC certificate. 3 credit(s)
  
  •  

    TSC 8950 - Certificate Integrative Seminar


    The final part of the Certificate is the integrative paper. The purpose of the integrative paper is to give the learner an opportunity to draw together the most important aspects of the Certificate courses, to assess strengths and identify further learning needs, and to develop a specific plan for continuing personal and professional work. Prerequisite(s): Open only to students pursuing a TSC certificate. 1 credit(s)

Applied Psychophysiology

  
  •  

    APH 5001 - General Biology


    Students needing to meet the prerequisite of having had an undergraduate course in general biology will register for General Biology. The overall objective is for students to learn material and concepts within the subject matter of the course which is needed to form a solid basis for performing graduate level work in psychophysiology. Students will become familiar with the concepts and material usually covered in the course by doing readings in the assigned standard text and other materials, individual real-time discussions with faculty via the web, and developing answers to topic related questions. 1.0 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall A/SP A Course Length: 8 weeks. No RC component
  
  •  

    APH 5002 - General Psychology


    Students needing to meet the prerequisite of having had an undergraduate course in general psychology will register for General Psychology. The overall objective is for students to learn material and concepts within the subject matter of the course which is needed to form a solid basis for performing graduate level work in psychophysiology. Students will become familiar with the concepts and material usually covered in the course by doing readings in the assigned standard text and other materials, individual real-time discussions with faculty via the web, and developing answers to topic related questions. 1.0 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall - Term B/SP Term B Course Length: 8 weeks No RC component
  
  •  

    APH 5051 - Fundamentals of Psychophysiology


    This course explores the manifold ways the brain and body work together to produce behavior and the cycle between behavior and physiology. The course begins with a description of the body’s organizational structure and genetics as related to behavior. The basic physiological ways information is received from the external and internal environments through a variety of sensors and then processed by the hormonal / nervous system are described. Typical psychophysiological dysfunctions and interventions are also described. Prerequisite(s): Pre-requisites: Undergraduate courses in psychology and biology (or APH 5001  , APH 5002  ). 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: SP - Term B Course Length: 8 weeks. No RC component
  
  •  

    APH 5071 - Anatomy and Physiology for Psychophysiologists


    This course provides an overview of human anatomy and physiology as applied to psychophysiology, optimal functioning, and behavioral medicine. The course emphasizes human behavioral biology. Each basic structure and organ system is discussed with regard to both anatomical structures and physiological functions as they change over time and in relation to both the external and internal environment. The main course objective is to provide the depth of knowledge required to understand the physical bases for psychophysiological problems and interventions.  Interactions between the complex web of hormonal feed-back loops and dysregulation of behavior, emotions, and drives is discussed in relation to implementation of behavioral interventions. Other areas emphasized are respiratory physiology, behavioral immunology, psychophysiology of pain, interactions between pain, stress, and muscle tension, pathophysiology of headache, cardiovascular disease and hypertension, and basic kinesiological concepts. 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall - Term B Course Length: 8 weeks. Students taking this course must also attend the one day anatomy & physiology laboratory experience held during Saybrook University’s residential conferences and AABP’s annual meeting.
  
  •  

    APH 5101 - Psychophysiological Recording, Assessment, and Interventions


    This course provides a basic understanding of the physiology and methodology underlying common psychophysiological recording techniques used in behavioral medicine including surface electromyography, electroencephalography, respiration, blood pressure, pulse rate, skin temperature, and electrodermal responses. Sufficient knowledge about how common psychophysiological recording and biofeedback instruments function and are used is provided so students can incorporate psychophysiological aspects of assessment into their normal practices. This course also teaches the principles and applications of general biofeedback as used in educational and clinical settings. The strengths and weaknesses of evidence supporting the use of biofeedback for a variety of clinical disorders is reviewed and the techniques for actually doing biofeedback are detailed. Techniques for using biofeedback as a tool for shaping and conditioning responses to stress are emphasized. The laboratory portion of the courses provides sufficient hands on exposure to typical, clinical grade psychophysiological recording and biofeedback equipment and techniques that students will be able to recognize adequate and inadequate signals and be able to attach sensors to their patients appropriately so that good signals can be recorded. Prerequisite(s): APH 5622   3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: SP-Term A Course Length: 8 Weeks (Term A). 2 day RC Required
  
  •  

    APH 5111 - Genetic Foundations of Behavior


    This course explores the impact of genetics on human behavior in relation to the environment. Behavioral genetics addresses questions such as: “How do genes determine behavior? How much of behavior is nature versus nurture? How do behaviors evolve?” The course and its text provide “a range of examples, such as laboratory studies on flies and mice, field observations on species as diverse as butterflies and meerkats, as well as human behavioral disorders. Students will become familiar with “genetic principles with neurobiological and ecological perspectives so they learn how to find and map genes that affect behaviors. They will also learn how the coordinated expression of ensembles of these genes enables the nervous system to express complex behaviors in response to changes in the environment.”  Prerequisite(s): APH 5051   3.0 credit(s)
    Course Length: 8 weeks. No RC required.
  
  •  

    APH 5121 - Methodology in Psychophysiological Research


    This course covers the basic steps and time-line of a project, steps in formulating and maturing a question, research ethics, the protocol approval process, background and literature searches, and methods of determining a project’s feasibility and relevance. The logic and progression of study designs used to evaluate the efficacy of behavioral medicine studies is detailed and exemplified. Topics include single subject and single group designs - cohorts, multiple group designs, strengths and weaknesses of longitudinal and cross-sectional studies, prospective experimental vs. observational and retrospective designs. Students will learn about the strengths and weaknesses of such techniques as quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, meta-analysis, time series analysis, and population based data analysis. The course also covers research protocol design, the consent form, and the protocol review process. This section covers subject selection techniques (sampling, inclusion - exclusion, etc.), kinds of data (dichotomous, nominal, ordinal, continuous, etc.), techniques for hardening subjective data, validity and reliability, survey and questionnaire design, as well as pilot studies and the initial power analysis - feasibility and resources.  3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall - Term A/B, SP — Term A/B Course Length: 16 weeks. No RC required.
  
  •  

    APH 5122 - Data Analysis in Psychophysiological Research


    This course covers the information students need to know how data are analyzed in typical psychophysiological studies. The course helps students understand what the typical tests are, when they should be used, and the underlying assumptions for each test. This is crucial because these are the techniques which should be seen when reading studies involving psychophysiology. If typical tests are not used in a study or the data do not meet the underlying assumptions of the tests, students will know not to trust the study’s results.  Students learn how to actually perform each of the tests on a variety of types of data so they will have confidence in their abilities to use the tests in their research. 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall - Term A/B, SP - Term A/B Course Length: 16 weeks. No RC required.
  
  •  

    APH 5123 - Practice Research Study in Psychophysiology


    The practice study gives students a chance to apply their new skills in subject recruitment, data gathering, and data analysis to actual subjects by participating in a preapproved research study designed during APH5121 and APH5122. Students must NOT begin this course until (a) the instructor in APH5122 has approved the practice protocol and the IRB documents and (b) the IRB has approved the IRB submission. 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall - Term A/B, SP — Term A/B Course Length: 16 weeks. No RC required.
  
  •  

    APH 5151 - Pain Assessment and Intervention


    This course describes the underlying psychophysiology of pain and summarizes the strengths and weaknesses of evidence supporting the efficacy of self-regulatory interventions for prevention and reduction of various pain problems. Interactions between pain, stress, and muscle tension are emphasized. Extensive examples of how to perform psychophysiological interventions for various psychophysiologically maintained and magnified pain states are provided. The pathophysiology of migraine, tension, cluster, rebound, medication induced, and other types of headaches is reviewed. Current schema for differential diagnosis of the various types of headache are discussed in relation to interactions between behavioral medicine providers, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, neurologists, and other health care providers. The evidence supporting the efficacy of behavioral interventions for various types of headaches is reviewed. Detailed examples of patient education and training materials are provided along with typical behavioral training regimes and pathways. Prerequisite(s): APH 5101   3.0 credit(s)
    Course Length: 8 weeks. No RC required.
  
  •  

    APH 5181 - Hormonal and Perceptual Influences on Behavior


    Hormones have huge impacts of many aspects of our behavior ranging from instinctive sexual behaviors through identification of likely spouses, how we remember events, patterns of play, etc. Differences in our perceptual abilities result in our perceiving the world so differently that they influence many of our fears and believes about what is around us. This course explores the mechanisms through which hormones and perceptions lead to many of our most fundamental beliefs and the behaviors based on them. Prerequisite(s): APH 5051   3.0 credit(s)
    Course Length: 8 weeks. No RC required
  
  •  

    APH 5201 - Principles and Theories of Stress Management


    This course provides the basic information on the principles and theories underlying the application of stress management techniques in a variety of settings including the workplace, schools, and clinical practice. The course provides a historical perspective on development of these practices and a comparative approach to their use among the world’s cultures. Methods for identification of stressors are emphasized. Practices reviewed include meditation, autogenic exercises, humor, progressive muscle relaxation training and many others. Evidence supporting the efficacy of these practices in preventing and correcting stress related problems is detailed. The indications, non-indications and contra-indications of relaxation therapies are discussed. The course then provides detailed instruction in how to perform these techniques including typical multi-session regimes, handout, etc. The laboratory gives students a chance to practice these techniques under supervision on each other. Prerequisite(s): APH 5051  and APH 5101   3.0 credit(s)
    Course Length: 8 weeks. 1 day RC required.
  
  •  

    APH 5221 - Audio Visual Stimulation


    This course provides sufficient information on psychophysiological entrainment and stimulation for students to understand how various forms of physical stimulation are used to alter the brain and body’s functioning. Topics include (1) magnetic stimulation of the periphery to induce changes in peripheral blood flow, (2) magnetic stimulation of the brain to induce out of body experiences and control headaches, (3) physiological entrainment of breathing for control of hypertension, (4) Basics of arousal and dysarousal, (5) review of QEEG and HRV in relation to entrainment, (6) Physiology of AVE, (7) Standard Studies on AVE, (8) Cognitive Studies on AVE, (9) CES, (10) tDCS, (11) HRV - breath-work exercise, (12) Programming with the DAVID Session Editor, (13) use of “alphastim”-like devices to alter states of consciousness, and (14) neuromodulation including rTMS, etc.  Prerequisite(s): APH 5051  and APH 5101   3.0 credit(s)
    Course Length: 8 weeks. 1 day RC required
  
  •  

    APH 5251 - Neuropsychophysiology


    The course covers central and peripheral nervous system anatomy and physiology and finishes with an emphasis on nervous system pathophysiology. The brain/spinal cord plexus is discussed from both anatomical and physiological perspectives concentrating on plasticity in response to changes in the external and internal environment as well as viewing the system as an interactive organ with hormonal, nerve based, and blood flow based feedback and control systems. Current theories of memory formation and change with time and emotions are emphasized, as are effects of emotions and the environment on brain function. Psychophysiological recording methodology including EEG and scans such as MEG and PET are examined in relation to their uses in behavioral medicine. Neurological disorders centered on the CNS (such as epilepsy) are discussed in relationship to psychophysiological evaluations and behavioral interventions. The anatomy and physiology of the autonomic and somatic branches of the peripheral nervous system are discussed to provide a basic understanding how the system works in relationship with the whole body’s function and health. Emphasis is on the ever-changing balance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic portions of the autonomic nervous system that alters functions of nerves, glands, and muscles which can be trained to achieve a balanced life. The impact of the somatic nervous system on perception and action is also emphasized. Prerequisite(s): APH 5051 , APH 5101  and APH 5271   3.0 credit(s)
    Course Length: 8 weeks. 1 day RC required
  
  •  

    APH 5271 - EEG Biofeedback: Assessment and Intervention


    This course teaches the principles of recording the brain’s electrical activities through EEG, as well as other imaging techniques, that pertain to applied to psychophysiological assessments and interventions. The basic psychophysiology of the EEG signal is reviewed in relationship to educational applications and disorders (such as epilepsy and ADHD) treated with EEG biofeedback. The strengths and weaknesses of evidence supporting the use of EEG biofeedback for a variety of clinical disorders is reviewed and the techniques for actually doing EEG biofeedback are detailed. Prerequisite(s): APH 5051   3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall A Course Length: 8 weeks. 1 day RC required.
  
  •  

    APH 5281 - Advanced EEG Biofeedback: Theoretical and Clinical Considerations


    EEG Biofeedback has radically expanded over the past 10 years. As a result, the list of treatment options can seem overwhelming. Amidst the clamor of competing ideologies, manufacturers and treatment modalities, it is the responsibility of the advanced EEG biofeedback clinician to create a treatment approach that is effective and engaging for the trainee/patient/client. This class moves beyond the introduction to basic EEG feedback modalities and equipment, and into an overview of the state of the art of EEG, and the subsequent options and complex treatment decisions that are necessary in operating competently in the modern Neurofeedback climate.  Prerequisite(s): APH 5271   3.0 credit(s)
    Course Length: 8 weeks. 1 day RC required
  
  •  

    APH 5301 - Behaviorally Oriented Techniques


    The course covers five main areas: (a) wellness and community / group psychophysiology, (b) operant and classical conditioning, (c) imagery, (d) cognitive restructuring, and (e) meditation techniques. Wellness programs for maintaining and increasing the health of individuals and of specific communities such as students in a class, older people in an assisted living community, workers in an office or factory are becoming increasingly popular. The evidence supporting the efficacy of these programs is reviewed and ways to optimize such programs, in light of this evidence, for different groups is discussed. Classical operant and instrumental conditioning are powerful tools which can be used to shape the behavior of individuals and groups in the work/school and clinical setting. The history of, supporting evidence for, and basic techniques for each type of conditioning are presented. The standard techniques of self-hypnosis, and imagery training are described and students are taught the elements of their application. Uses of these techniques with specific types of patients and integration of these techniques into other behavioral medicine interventions is discussed. The history, supporting efficacy studies, and basis for the major meditation techniques are described in relation to self-regulation. Prerequisite(s): APH 5051   3.0 credit(s)
    Course Length: 8 weeks. No RC required
  
  •  

    APH 5351 - Clinical Psychopharmacology


    Students develop a foundational understanding in psychopharmacology important to client-oriented clinical practice in counseling. Students develop skills in forming a collaborative team with the client and the prescribing health professional. The course surveys fundamental diagnoses that may be accompanied by psychotropic medications and methods to help clients monitor medication effectiveness. The course emphasizes psychoactive medications within a biopsychosocial understanding of the client. 3.0 credit(s)
    Course Length: 16 weeks. No RC required
  
  •  

    APH 5401 - Psychophysiological Assessment and Treatment of Sleep


    This course covers the basic psychophysiology of sleep and sleep disorders as well as psychophysiological and other methods of assessing sleep. The basics of sleep cannot be understood without a firm understanding of biological rhythms so this topic will be covered as it relates to sleep. Prerequisite(s): APH 5051  and APH 5101   3.0 credit(s)
    Course Length: 8 weeks. 1 day RC required
  
  •  

    APH 5451 - Optimal Functioning: Psychophysiological Applications in the Community, School, Sports, and Workplace


    Effectively working within large organizations to increase work efficiency, decrease accidents, and increase morale while decreasing stress related absences, disorders, and conflicts is a complex task being requested by more and more employers as the impact of stress on the workforce become better recognized. Optimal performance in these environments is difficult but achievable with appropriate training. The research supporting the efficacy of such efforts is reviewed and the typical techniques for interventions with diverse groups are illustrated. A wide variety of behavioral interventions have been effective in enhancing and optimizing performance in many settings. Effects include increased endurance and accuracy under many circumstances - especially within sports and the military. The evidence supporting this assertion is reviewed and examples are provided of specific interventions shown to be effective in specific circumstances. Effective presentation of behavioral medicine concepts to diverse groups is a daunting task which requires considerable training and experience. Practices are frequently augmented through communicating with peers, other health care professionals and administrators, the public, and potential patients. Effective methods for presenting to each type of group are very different but have been well worked out. Typical presentation methods for workshops, lectures, and public appearances are presented which are likely to optimize understanding of behavioral medicine techniques.  Prerequisite(s): APH 5051  and APH 5101   3.0 credit(s)
    Course Length: 8 weeks. No RC required
  
  •  

    APH 5515 - Graduate Colloquium


    The Graduate Colloquium class is a virtual online orientation to the fundamentals of graduate study and to the field of applied psychophysiology.  This course is designed to support new students as they (a) articulate personal and professional aspirations and goals, (b) develop working relationships with classmates and instructors, and (c) engage in professional learning through webinars and dialogue.  The online platform provides an engaging environment for the cohort to connect and learn from each other’s experiences. 1.0 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term A/B, SP-Term A/B Course Length: 16 weeks No RC required
  
  •  

    APH 5551 - Neuromuscular Reeducation


    This course teaches the elements of kinesiological movement science and how control of movement is distorted by different clinical conditions. The course includes the elements of (a) trigger point, (b) posture, and (c) motor control / coordination assessment. Methods for using psychophysiological recording techniques for assessment of movement related disorders and postural problems are illustrated. The impact of poor posture and improper sequencing of muscle motions as well as of improper levels of tension on development and sustainment of various pain problems such as tension headaches and low back pain are discussed. Techniques for using sEMG biofeedback and other psychophysiological techniques to correct these problems are illustrated. Issues of which techniques should be applied by which types of professionals given various training and scopes of practice are discussed.  Prerequisite(s): APH 5071  and APH 5101   3.0 credit(s)
    Course Length: 8 weeks. 1 day RC required
  
  •  

    APH 5561 - Quantitative Electroencephalogram as an Assessment Tool


    Quantitative electroencephalogram (QEEG) has become an important technique for psychophysiological assessment of brain-based disorders. This course covers reading and artifacting the EEG record, montages, database comparisons, drug effects on the EEG, frequency analysis, spectral and topographic aspects and basic neuroanatomy and physiology, based upon Brodmann areas and anatomical structures. Prerequisite(s): APH 5271   3.0 credit(s)
    Course Length: 8 weeks. 1 day RC required
  
  •  

    APH 5571 - Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback


    This course meets the requirements for the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance “certificate of completion” in heart rate variability (HRV). The course emphasizes methods for evaluation and training of autonomic nervous system quieting through heart rate variability biofeedback training. HRV biofeedback has been demonstrated by extensive research to provide therapeutic benefits for a growing number of medical and mental health disorders. Topics covered in the course include: (1) Cardiac anatomy and physiology, (2) Respiratory anatomy and physiology, (3) Autonomic nervous system anatomy and physiology, (4) Heart rate variability psychophysiology, (5) biofeedback instrumentation, (6) measurement, (7) biofeedback training strategies, and (8) clinical applications. Prerequisite(s): APH 5101   3.0 credit(s)
    Course Length: 8 weeks. No RC required
  
  •  

    APH 5622 - Basic Training and Education in Biofeedback


    This course provides students with a basic skill-set to conduct simple biofeedback interventions, along with knowledge about biofeedback concepts and approaches, and a familiarity with research-based applications of biofeedback to common medical and behavioral disorders. This course provides students with an introductory level of understanding helpful for engaging in biofeedback-based clinical practice and psychophysiological research in integrative health. This course introduces the most commonly used biofeedback instruments, the physiological systems they measure, and the applications of these biofeedback modalities to common medical and behavioral disorders. The Saybrook biofeedback training sequence covers the Blueprint of Knowledge adopted by the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance, to guide training of biofeedback professionals (BCIA, 2006). In addition, the course overviews current scientific approaches to research on biofeedback, and will discuss several approaches for utilizing biofeedback in psychotherapy, in optimal performance training in sports and the arts, and in personal transformation. 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: FA - Term A Course Length: 8 weeks. 2 day RC Required.
  
  •  

    APH 5627 - Intermediate Biofeedback


    This course — “intermediate training and education in general biofeedback” — provides students with more advanced skills to conduct effective higher-level biofeedback interventions, along with additional knowledge about biofeedback concepts and approaches, and a more solid grounding in research on biofeedback. The knowledge and skills included in the Saybrook biofeedback training sequence follow the “Blueprint of Knowledge” developed by the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance to guide training of biofeedback professionals (BCIA, 2006). Prerequisite(s): APH 5622   3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: Spring - Term A Course Length: 8 weeks. 1 day RC required
  
  •  

    APH 5651 - Pelvic Floor Disorders


    This course provides a basic understanding of pelvic floor functions and structures along with clinical etiologies of pelvic floor disorders treated by behavioral interventions. Urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence, and muscle tension related pelvic floor and vaginal pain are emphasized. Sufficient information on research supporting behavioral interventions, clinical protocols for behavioral interventions, and sufficient simulated demonstrations are presented to bring health care providers to the point where they have the knowledge base needed to provide these interventions to their clients, within their scopes of practice and expertise, after the providers gain hands-on experience by working with experienced practitioners. Prerequisite(s): APH 5101   3.0 credit(s)
    Course Length: 8 weeks. 1/2 day RC required
  
  •  

    APH 5701 - Practicum and Field Experience


    Students identify a clinical or applied site or sites which will provide practice opportunities for two or more of the skill areas accrued as part of their PhD degree.  Students may not select a practicum which only provides experience in areas the students are already certified or in which they have already established proficiency. Students may choose up to three settings, in which they will accrue a minimum of 90 practice hours.  Students are responsible for making financial and administrative arrangements with the director of each clinical setting. The staff of the setting is responsible for supervising the student’s clinical work at that setting and must agree to send the Saybrook University practicum instructor a detailed report of the student’s experience, number of hours spent at the site, and success at the end of the rotation.  The practicum instructor meets weekly in a videoconference with students currently in practicum settings and reviews practice experiences and skills utilized by the students in the practicum setting. A learning contract and specific learning objectives for each site are developed conjointly with the student, the Saybrook practicum instructor, and the supervising professional responsible at the clinical site. The learning contract for each site must be approved in writing by the Applied Psychophysiology Department Chair before work can begin at that site. Prerequisite(s): APH 5051  and APH 5101   3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: FA - Term AB, SP-Term A/B Course Length: 16 weeks. No RC required
  
  •  

    APH 5751 - Professional Development Planning Seminars


    Students who have not yet established a clear career path need to plan how to integrate newly acquired psychophysiological skills into one’s professional life is critical to insuring that the program is worth pursuing. Students participate in Professional Development Seminars given approximately monthly spread across the program’s first year to aid in preparing a business plan which will be ready to be put into effect by the time the program has been completed. The plan is intended to be a guideline for application of psychophysiological skills in each student’s unique setting, be it private practice, an institutional setting or any other system or combination. Prerequisite(s): APH 5101  and permission of the APH department chair. 3.0 credit(s)
    Course Length: 8/16 weeks No RC required.
  
  •  

    APH 5771 - Case Seminars


    Students meet by video conference call about twice per month for an hour and a half to discuss psychophysiologically oriented cases they have worked with. The discussion is facilitated by the course instructor(s). Students are expected to comment on each other’s cases. Students scheduled to present at a particular meeting must e-mail brief case summaries of each case to be presented to the instructor(s) and other students at least a week in advance. These discussions are intended to guide students toward an understanding of how to incorporate psychophysiological assessment and interventional techniques into their usual approaches to patient care and to provide a bridge between the theoretical material presented during the lecture courses and the realities of modern clinical, educational, and coaching applications. The instructors are BCIA certified (Biofeedback Certification Institute of America certified) in general biofeedback, pelvic floor muscle disorders, and neurofeedback. They will use the seminar to mentor students through sufficient cases so that each student meets the BCIA requirements for mentoring in any of the above specialties in which the student wishes to be certified. Prerequisite(s): APH 5101 , APH 5271  and permission of the APH Department Chair. 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: SP Term A/B Course Length: 16 weeks. No RC required
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6