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2017-2018 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook with Summer Addendum
Saybrook University
   
 
  Oct 16, 2019
 
2017-2018 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook with Summer Addendum 
    
2017-2018 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook with Summer Addendum [Archived Catalog]

Course Descriptions


Courses are identified and organized by degree program. Listed below are those courses that may be offered through the Department of Humanistic & Clinical Psychology for the Psychology degree program as well as the Human Science degree program for the 2015-2016 academic school year. CampusVue will list courses open for enrollment each semester, by Section if applicable.

Courses are identified and organized by degree programs: Clinical Psychology, PhD. Courses listed are offered as online cohort (CO), residential (R), or individually-mentored online (IO). Not all courses are offered every semester. See Program Descriptions and Requirements section of the College of Social Sciences section of this catalog and the Saybrook University website for updates and/or changes to courses.

 

Mind-Body Medicine

  
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    MBM 5511 - Graduate Colloquium I


    The Graduate Colloquium I class is an orientation to the fundamentals of graduate study and academic scholarship.  This course is designed to support new students as they (a) articulate personal and professional aspirations and goals, and (b) develop and apply critical thinking and reasoning skills.  The online platform provides an engaging environment for the cohort to connect and learn from each other’s experiences. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 1 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA - Term A/SP - Term A Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5512 - Graduate Colloquium II


    The Graduate Colloquium II is scheduled near the end of the students’ curriculum and emphasizes professional development and career planning strategies.   Prerequisite(s):  No Prerequisite. 1 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA - Term A Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5521 - Reflective Leadership in Healthcare


    This course is designed to help organizational leaders and coaches to apply mindfulness to enhance leadership reflectivity on an individual and collective basis.  Content will explore applications of reflective practices to enhance leadership effectiveness and instill innovation and compassion in collective settings.  Course readings and assignments assess diverse meditative and contemplative theory and practices drawn from Eastern and Western traditions as well as modern secular teachings to explore how mindful practice can convey to reflective leadership style.  In addition, discussions and papers examine how reorienting organizational dispositions toward reflective postures can serve as a foundation for transforming healthcare towards integrated, integrative, and patient-centered systems.  Its objectives include the student’s cultivation of their own contemplative styles as well as developing strategies to introduce reflective practices to larger organizational settings.  Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term B Course Length: 8 Weeks (Term B) No RC Required
  
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    MBM 5523 - Mindfulness and Compassion-Based Leadership in Healthcare


    This course explores an emerging orientation in leadership theories and practice: to intentionally incorporate mindfulness and compassion-based perspectives into practices.  Students will assess the characteristics and intended outcomes of various contemporary paradigms that introduce mindful and compassion principles for developing individual leadership capacities as well as shifting organizational culture to a more sustainable environment.  Course assignments will focus on identifying how related principles can address issues in modern healthcare and adapting such corresponding practices to healthcare organization settings. This course provides methods for healthcare consultants, administrators, and researchers to evaluate leadership styles, processes and outcomes in holistic and humanistic ways through the use of mindful-oriented approaches, particularly in integrated settings. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: SP-Term A Course Length: 8 Weeks (Term A) RC Required
  
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    MBM 5524 - Contemporary Neuroscience-Psychology and the Brain


    This course explores brain and nervous system relationships with special emphasis on clinical examples and mind- body interactions. Beginning with the basic function of nerve cells (neurophysiology) we explore how cells communicate (the synapse and clinical neurochemistry) and the structure of the nervous system (neuroanatomy). Students learn about the most current neuro-imaging techniques. We explore neuroscience of the senses, emotion, arousal and stress. Neuroscience in Depression, Schizophrenia, Autism, and ADHD are investigated. The class concludes with a discussion of the biology of consciousness, meditation, and the brain-mind question. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA - Term B. Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5525 - Grant Writing


    This course explores the process of grant proposal writing from initial inquiry through submittal. Students completing the course will develop a grant proposal idea, research and choose a potential funder based upon funder guidelines, and understand each component of a proposal. The student finishes the class with a complete and thoughtfully-prepared grant proposal ready for submittal. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5540  or MBM 5542   3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered - SP - Term B. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5533 - Health Informatics: The Science of Healthcare Information


    This course introduces students to the field of health informatics with particular emphasis on evaluating the effectiveness of technology interfaces with both conventional and integrative health care practitioners as well as patients. Students will learn Federal legislative requirements for health information technology use by healthcare systems as well as individual practitioners. The electronic medical record, electronic health record, personal health record, clinical decision support systems, telemedicine, and mobile health (m-health) will be explored in detail. Patient satisfaction and increased quality of care are two of the primary reasons for the mandatory adoption of health technology. As a result, the role of the patient in health informatics is woven throughout the course. The structure of this class is designed so that students are placed in the role of consultant or manager, becoming proficient in the application of health information technology. Each student will research a health care application and its impact on a patient population. The primary purpose of the research assignment is to describe the impact of the on the larger healthcare system [this can be specific to a regional healthcare system, the U.S. national system, or global health]. This course will not require prior software knowledge other than a working level of understanding in navigation with Microsoft Operating Systems and the Office Suite. Successful completion of the course will require a basic knowledge of on-line research methods and the use of available and authoritative databases. The course will progress over a period of 8 modules with an integrative paper due in Module 7, a mid-term analysis of technical briefs, and a final exam. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA - Term B. Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5540 - Fundamentals of Research


    This course is a foundational “research literacy course” in the doctoral program which provides an overview of quantitative and qualitative research. Students will learn about the elements of a research study. Students will learn to read and evaluate research studies to support their individual research interests based on current scholarship. Prerequisite(s): MBM 1009   3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA - Term A/B/SP - Term A/B. Course Length: 16 Weeks. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5542 - Research Literacy for Scholar - Practitioners


    This course emphasizes fundamental research competencies that are integral for health professionals.  In eight weeks, students will engage in applied learning activities to effectively (a) differentiate between various types of empirical evidence, (b) evaluate the methods used in various health related studies, (c) compare and contrast basic statistical concepts, (d) summarize and critique the validity of the findings and conclusions, and (e) determine implications for professional practice. Prerequisite(s): MBM 1009   3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term B, SP-Term B. Course Length: 8 weeks No RC Required
  
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    MBM 5543 - Statistical Methods for Healthcare Research I


    This course provides an overview on the use of statistical methods in healthcare research. Students a) become familiar with statistics, b) understand the most commonly used statistics for graduate research, and c) comprehend the relationship between statistical techniques, sample size, and statistical significance. Prerequisite(s): 5538 or MBM 5553 , and 5539 or MBM 5557 . 2 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SP - Term A. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 7 (3), 7(4), 7.1 (4), 7.2 (4)
  
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    MBM 5545 - Assessing Systems and Processes in Healthcare


    This course introduces students to a systems-oriented approach to assessing healthcare systems and processes. This course provides methods for healthcare consultants, administrators, and researchers to evaluate care systems, processes, and outcomes in holistic and humanistic ways through the use of systems-oriented approaches. Students learn to adapt a systems and organizational perspective, identify problems in care systems, and assess the outcomes of systemic changes. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SP - Term A. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 5.1 (5), 5.3 (3), 6.1 (3), 6.3 (3), 7.1 (4), 8.1 (4), 8.2 (3), 8.2 (5), 8.4 (4), 8.5 (3), 8.5 (5).
  
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    MBM 5546 - Statistical Methods for Healthcare Research II


    This course provides a continuation of the prerequisite course, MBM 5543 . This course provides an overview on the use of statistical methods in healthcare research. Students a) become familiar with statistics, b) understand the most commonly used statistics for graduate research, and c) comprehend the relationship between statistical techniques, sample size, and statistical significance. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5543 . 1 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SP - Term B. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 7 (3), 7 (4), 7.1 (4), 7.2 (4).
  
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    MBM 5551 - Doctoral Research Pilot Study I


    This course guides students in developing a qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods research design, serving as a pilot study for dissertation research. The course meets the following objectives: Students a) propose and refine a research question, b) develop a research design, addressing recruitment, interventions, any measurements, and data collection methods, c) specify methods for data analysis, and d) submit a SIRB application, assuring the protections of human participants. By the end of the second segment of the course, students a) implement the research design, b) recruit participants, c) conduct the research, and d) prepare a written research report, including all of the elements in a research report. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5540 , 5538, or 5548 or MBM 5553  or MBM 5556 ; 5539, 5549 or MBM 5557 . 1 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered all terms. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: L.O. 6.1, 7.1, 7.3, 7.4.
  
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    MBM 5552 - Doctoral Research Pilot Study II


    This course serves as a continuation of the prerequisite course MBM 5551 . This course guides students in developing a qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods research design, serving as a pilot study for dissertation research. The course will meet the following objectives: Students a) propose and refine a research question, b) develop a research design, addressing recruitment, interventions, any measurements, and data collection methods, c) specify methods for data analysis, and d) submit a SIRB application, assuring the protections of human participants. By the end of the second segment of the course, students a) implement the research design, b) recruit participants, c) conduct the research, and d) prepare a written research report, including all of the elements in a research report. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5540 ; MBM 5551 ; 5538. 5538, or 5548 or MBM 5553  or MBM 5556 ; 5539, 5549 or MBM 5557 . 2 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered all terms. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: L.O. 6.1, 7.1, 7.3, 7.4.
  
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    MBM 5553 - Quantitative Research Overview


    This course will introduce students to the characteristics and various approaches to designing and conducting quantitative research projects in health care.  It provides an overview of the research process beginning with the identification of a research topic and question, reviewing literature, selecting a study approach, and proceeding through the collection and analysis of data and writing up findings.  In this course students will identify a topic for their pilot study and review relevant literature.  They will also begin to develop a research question and identify other aspect of the research design that them may include in their pilot study and dissertation. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5540  or MBM 5542   3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA - Term A/B, SP - Term A/B. Course Length: 16 Weeks. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5554 - Doctoral Research Pilot Study II


    In the pilot study course, students complete a small-scale project to practice implementing a specific component of the data collection method they intend to use in their dissertation. Students write up a research protocol and complete an IRB application. After IRB approval, students collect and analyze data, report on the findings, and identify opportunities to enhance future dissertation research. Students may enroll in MBM5554C for one additional semester, if they have completed all assignments through the submission of the IRB application.  If they have not completed these elements of the course, they must re-enroll in MBM 5554. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5555   and MBM 5557   3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA-Term A/B, SP-Term A/B. Course Length: 16 Weeks. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5554C - Doctoral Research Pilot Study Continuation


    After seeking the instructor’s approval, students may register for the continuation course for one additional semester if they have completed the protocol and IRB application. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5554   0 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term A/B, SP-Term A/B, SU-Term A. Course Length: 16 Weeks (SU 8 Weeks). No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5555 - Doctoral Research Pilot Study


    In the pilot study course, students complete a small-scale project to practice implementing a specific component of the data collection method they intend to use in their dissertation. Students write up a research protocol and complete an IRB application. After IRB approval, students collect and analyze data, report on the findings, and identify opportunities to enhance future dissertation research. Students may enroll in MBM5555C for one additional semester, if they have completed all assignments through the submission of the IRB application.  If they have not completed these elements of the course, they must re-enroll in MBM 5555. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5557   3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term A/B, SP-Term A/B. Course Length: 16 Weeks. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5555c - Doctoral Research Pilot Study — Continuation


    After seeking the instructor’s approval, students may register for the continuation course for one additional semester if they have completed the protocol and IRB application. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5555  0 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term A/B, SP-Term A/B, SU-Term A. Course Length: 16 Weeks (SU 8 Weeks) No RC Required
  
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    MBM 5556 - Qualitative Research Overview


    This course introduces students to the characteristics and various approaches to designing and conducting qualitative research projects in health care. It provides an overview of the qualitative research process and various qualitative methodologies. The student will learn to select a research topic, formulate a research question and/or hypothesis, identify an appropriate research methodology and design, and conduct a literature review. Students will articulate a research topic and question, select an appropriate methodology, and identify and review literature relevant to their interest and application. They will also begin to develop a research design and identify other aspects of the research process that they may include in their pilot study and dissertation. This course also supports students in applying the course subject matter toward ongoing research and clinical interests, in conjunction with other courses and learning experiences in the student’s graduate studies. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5540  or MBM 5542   3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term A/B, SP - Term A/B. Course Length: 16 Weeks. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5557 - Advanced Research Method


    This course will help prepare students for their research in the pilot study and dissertation by guiding them to study a specific research methodology or approach.  Students will study a pre-identified method in depth and identify aspects of the research design to include in their pilot study and dissertation.  Coursework will direct students to individually develop a research design, address sample recruitment, interventions, any measurements and tools, data collection methods, and specify methods for data analysis. This course also supports students in preparing to be scholar-practitioners in conjunction with other courses and learning experiences in the student’s graduate studies. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5553  or MBM 5556   3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term A/B, SP - Term A/B. Course Length: 16 Weeks. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5558 - Advanced Research Method II


    This course will help prepare students for their research in the pilot study and dissertation by guiding them to study a specific research methodology or approach. Students will study a pre-identified method in depth and identify aspects of the research design to include in their pilot study and dissertation. Coursework will direct students to individually develop a research design, address sample recruitment, interventions, any measurements and tools, data collection methods, and specify methods for data analysis.

    This course also supports students in preparing to be scholar-practitioners in conjunction with other courses and learning experiences in the student’s graduate studies. This course is for students who have already taken MBM 5557 Advanced Research Methods and who are learning an additional research methodology. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5557   3 credit(s)
    Offered: Term A/B, SP - Term A/B. Course Length: 16 Weeks. No RC Required.

  
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    MBM 5564 - Integrative Healthcare as a Complex Adaptive System


    This introductory course provides students with an overview of healthcare policy and introduces complexity theory as an approach to further an integrative healthcare agenda. Course materials provide students with an overview of U.S. contemporary healthcare policy and then introduce complexity principles as one subset of systems thinking. Through both theory and practice, using principles from complexity, and assignments that combine theory and application, students will learn to recognize dynamic widespread phenomena and individual human interactions in basic ways that inform better understanding and communication, particularly as these relate to integrative healthcare. This perspective offers a valuable foundation for designing or changing complex human systems like businesses, hospitals and healthcare systems, and taking on an advocacy role in complementary integrative medicine. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: SU - Term A. Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5567 - Leadership in Healthcare


    This course takes the perspective that leadership in healthcare systems is about individuals, roles, culture, and systems. Leadership is about personal, team, and organizational values. Exceptional leadership involves self-awareness, a compelling vision, emotional intelligence, a philosophy of serving and developing others, and masterful implementation. All need to be included to comprehend the nature of, the development of, and the practice of leadership. Leadership represents a holistic view of the relationships among individuals, cultures, and systems. It proposes three distinctions that will assist in clarifying thinking about leadership, its development and practices: leading, leader, and leadership. Leadership recognizes how individuals-in any type of group or organization-can bring an organization together with limited formal power, and can help an organization to grow and thrive. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SU - Term A. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.3 (4), 2.1 (4), others TBA.
  
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    MBM 5568 - Integrative Perspectives on the Human Life Course


    This course examines important life experiences that impact many or all people in the course of living, including trauma, caregiving, and substance abuse. Opportunities and challenges that present in the second half of life will also be addressed, with an emphasis on life-long development and growth. The course emphasizes wellness from a mind-body-spirit perspective and approaches that enhance growth and development. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SP - Term B. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.1 (3), 1.2 (3), 3.1 (4), 3.2 (4), 3.3 (3), 3.4 (3), 6.1 (3), 6.2 (3), 6.3 (3), 8.1 (3), 8.1 (4).
  
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    MBM 5569 - Consulting Skills


    The Professional Consultant in healthcare exercises a form of leadership without direct authority or control over an organization. Yet, consultants can play a critical role in mobilizing organizational resources, and inspiring a process of transformational change. Health consultants may work in major university medical centers and hospital systems, corporate medical clinics and health systems, corporate wellness credits, health insurance organizations, and small community or privately based clinics and group practices. Consultants work closely with other people who are responsible for the outcomes. Consulting can be part of any professional role such as that of a teacher, therapist, counselor, coach, or leader. A key skill is the ability to use influence and persuasion to help others get things done. A second key skill is to recognize the critical moment when a human system is ready for a change process. In effect, whenever a professional cannot or does not want to force people into action, yet needs to suggest or advocate a plan of action, the skills developed in this course will be useful. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: SP - Term B. Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5584 - Doctoral Level Professional Seminar in Mind-Body Medicine


    This course prepares students to embrace their professional identity as scholar-practitioners. Individuals have the opportunity to prepare for the dissertation proposal course, present their research proposal idea to peers, and critique a dissertation. In addition, they are supported through the process as they establish personal and professional goals for their work in the field of integrative healthcare. Prerequisite(s): All coursework or permission from Department Chair. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered every term. Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5586 - Ph.D. Practicum


    This course is structured to allow students to explore real-world situations and issues that emerge related to future practice. Students apply mind-body skills, instructional strategies, and facilitation techniques in clinical, community, and professional settings. The appropriate student-identified site allows the student to engage practicum clients in mind-body counseling and education approaches and techniques for individuals and groups. The practicum can also be set to pursue mind-body research and/or organizational development activities. Possible settings include: hospitals, clinics, counseling centers, schools, nursing homes, community centers, wellness centers, homeless shelters, group homes, jails, prisons, and corporate work places. Requirements: 100 hours of practicum experience and weekly video conference participation. (Note: This course requires several weeks preparation before course begins.) Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA Term A/B, SP Term A/B, and SU-Term. Course Length: 16 Weeks (SU 8 weeks) No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5586C - Ph.D. Practicum Continuation


    After seeking the instructor’s approval, students may register for the continuation course if they need an additional term or semester to complete 100 hours of practicum experience. The continuation course may not exceed 16 weeks. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5586   0 credit(s)
    Offered: FA Term A/B, SP Term A/B, and SU-Term. Course Length: 16 Weeks (SU 8 Weeks). No RC required.
  
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    MBM 5588 - MS Capstone Seminar


    This course provides students with a forum and guidance for reviewing and integrating the knowledge they have gained throughout their MS program in Mind-Body Medicine. In a final culminating essay, students will explore a question that allows them to synthesize knowledge from their completed coursework and discuss how they will utilize mind-body medicine principles in their current and future careers as scholar-practitioners. In addition, students will be asked to identify their achievements and remaining challenges in their personal and professional learning, as well as set goals for their continuing development.  Prerequisite(s): Students must complete all required CIMHS coursework or be enrolled in a final course while taking the capstone seminar. Exceptions must be approved by the Department Chair. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered every term. Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5588C - MS Capstone Seminar Continuation


    After seeking the instructor’s approval, students may register for the continuation course for an additional term or semester to complete the final capstone essay.  The continuation course may not exceed a total of 16 weeks. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5588   0 credit(s)
    Offered: Every term. Course Length: 8 weeks No RC Required
  
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    MBM 5594 - Advanced Hypnosis Practicum


    This course provides an immersion in advanced hypnotic technique and practice. Course readings and educational videos provide guidance and sample interventions utilizing hypnotic induction and therapeutic suggestion. Students engage in weekly hypnosis practice with volunteers and/or professional clients. The instructor(s) provide six videoconferences with discussion of strategies for hypnotic interventions for a variety of clinical and life problems, and supervision of the students’ practice. Students submit a video record of two hypnotic intervention sequences. Students complete a capstone essay, integrating their learning in the imagery and hypnosis course sequence, along with their learning in the advanced practicum course. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5620 , MBM 5625 . 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Every tem. (Offering depends upon enrollment numbers.) Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5595 - Advanced Biofeedback Practicum


    This course includes online contact with faculty and fellow students, directed readings and research in a specialty area, as well as applied practice of biofeedback and/or neurofeedback with regular group-based supervision. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5622 , MBM 5627 . 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Every term. (Offering depends upon enrollment numbers.) Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5600 - Mind-Body Medicine: Overview


    The Mind-Body Medicine: An Overview course provides a foundational introduction to mind-body medicine and integrative health. The course reviews paradigms for health and healing implicit in mainstream medicine, humanistic psychology, complementary and integrative therapies, and traditional healing systems in non-Western cultures. The course examines scientific advances in psychoneuroimmunology, the neurosciences, and consciousness studies, with implications for mind-body healing. The course focuses on the nature of the healing process, including a review of health care practices within various cultural systems and historical eras. The course assists students to recognize the relationships among conceptual paradigms, research approaches, explanatory models for disease, and specific therapeutic interventions. Students are challenged to develop a personal vision of health and health care which emphasizes higher level wellness for self and patient, the unity of mind-body-spirit, and the active role of the patient in the healing process. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: FA - Term A/SP - Term A Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5615 - Movement, Exercise, and Health


    This course reviews the critical place of physical movement and exercise in the maintenance and restoration of health. Sedentary lifestyle has been identified as a factor in the onset of many chronic diseases and conditions. Conversely, physical activity positively impacts brain chemistry, mood, and general well-being. The course explores the use of movement and exercise as a key aspect in developing self-awareness and examines the overall impact of various modalities on healthy physiology and chronic illness. Students learn strategies for using a variety of forms of movement for mental, emotional and physical renewal. The course includes an experiential component and examines yoga, tai chi or chi gong, dance, dynamic movement meditations, martial arts, and aerobic exercise as interventions for optimal health. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: SP - Term A. Course Length: 8 Weeks. RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5620 - Basic Training and Education in Hypnosis


    This course provides students with a basic skill-set to conduct simple hypnotic interventions, along with knowledge about hypnotic concepts and approaches, and a familiarity with research-based applications of hypnosis to common medical and behavioral disorders. This course provides students with an introductory level of understanding helpful for engaging in hypnosis-based clinical practice and hypnosis- oriented research in integrative health. This course introduces simple trance induction protocols, trance deepening techniques, the use of post-hypnotic suggestion, and techniques to re-alert the subject and close the trance phase. In addition, the course overviews current scientific approaches to explaining hypnotic phenomena, introduces the measurement and significance of hypnotic susceptibility, and presents several of the widely used and effective approaches for utilizing hypnosis in psychotherapy and personal transformation. Students completing this basic training sequence are equipped to begin the intermediate level training. The course is designed to follow the Standards of Training in Clinical Hypnosis as presented by D. Corydon Hammond and Gary R. Elkins for the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis- Education and Research Foundation (2005). Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA - Term A. Course Length: 8 Weeks. RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5625 - Intermediate Training and Education in Hypnosis


    This course provides students with an advanced skill-set to conduct advanced hypnotic interventions, along with additional knowledge about hypnotic concepts and approaches. In addition, the student develops a sophisticated ability to learn and assess new applications of hypnosis to common medical and behavioral disorders. This course provides students with an intermediate level of understanding helpful for engaging in hypnosis-based clinical practice and hypnosis-oriented research in integrative health. This course introduces more challenging trance induction protocols, trance deepening techniques, and uses of post- hypnotic suggestion. In addition, the student learns specific approaches and techniques for a number of advanced application areas, including: 1. pain management, 2. treatment of anxiety disorders, 3. habit change protocols, 4. weight management, and 5. ego strengthening hypnotic interventions. In addition, the course reviews scientific approaches to investigating hypnotic phenomena, trains students to implement a widely accepted measure of hypnotic susceptibility, and engages the student in discussion of ethical and appropriate uses of hypnotic techniques. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5620  (or equivalent training with instructor approval) 3 credit(s)
    Offered: SP - Term A. Course Length: 8 Weeks. RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5629 - Evidence-Based Competencies and Skills for Coaching


    This course provides students with an extensive overview of the foundational coaching competencies and skills as defined by the International Coach Federation (ICF) and Board Certified Coach (BCC) organizations. The coaching skills and competencies learned in this class can be applied to diverse contexts such as integrative health and wellness, leadership and business, and life coaching. In addition, students will gain a deeper understanding of the theories and evidence-based practices underlying various coaching approaches. This course will also provide students with basic level knowledge and skill development in group coaching and facilitation. Students who complete this course will be prepared to utilize and apply their coaching and facilitation skills within their chosen profession. This is a highly interactive and experiential class. This course will also provide those students interested in deepening their coaching skill set with a solid foundation to prepare them for more advanced courses in coaching. [Note this is equivalent course to MBM 5630 Coaching for Health and Wellness and MBM 5631 - Coaching for Health and Wellness - Dietary and Nutritional Coaching ] 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SP - Term A. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.4 (3), 2.1 (3), 2.3 (4), 2.4 (3), 3.2 (4), 3.3 (5), 5.1 (3), 5.2 (2), 7.1 (3).
  
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    MBM 5631 - Coaching for Health and Wellness - Dietary and Nutritional Coaching


    This course provides students with an extensive overview of the foundational coaching competencies and skills as defined by the International Coach Federation (ICF) and Board Certified Coach (BCC) organizations. The coaching skills and competencies learned in this class can be applied to diverse contexts such as integrative health and wellness, leadership and business, and life coaching. In addition, students will gain a deeper understanding of the theories and evidence-based practices underlying various coaching approaches. This course will also provide students with basic level knowledge and skill development in group coaching and facilitation. Students who complete this course will be prepared to utilize and apply their coaching and facilitation skills within their chosen profession. This is a highly interactive and experiential class. This course will also provide those students interested in deepening their coaching skill set with a solid foundation to prepare them for more advanced courses in coaching. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SP - Term A. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1.4 (3), 2.1 (3), 2.3 (4), 2.4 (3), 3.2 (4), 3.3 (5), 5.1 (3), 5.2 (2), 7.1 (3).
  
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    MBM 5633 - MA in Integrative Wellness Coaching Capstone Seminar


    This is the final course in the Integrative Wellness Coaching master’s curriculum, providing students with the opportunity to integrate their learning throughout the degree program. Students will complete a capstone essay summarizing their learning experiences in this program, and formulate their professional approach to integrative wellness coaching and health promotion. Students will also develop and present a strategic marketing and business plan that describes the evidence-based coaching approach or program that they intend to implement within their respective professional niche. This pragmatic orientation to business planning will help students explore key issues and answer important questions related to their future practice in integrative wellness coaching and health promotion. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered every term. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: TBA.
  
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    MBM 5635 - Spirituality and Health


    This course covers the principles of spiritual practices, ceremony and ritual in healing for Mind-Body Medicine Practitioners. We explore the clinical implications of research on spirituality and examine how the spiritual potential of mind-body medicine has been demonstrated in clinical practice. We consider how practitioners can be therapeutic with clients/patients from disparate belief systems. We study indigenous healing from Native America, Africa, India and the Caribbean as well as pagan approaches to healing. Students learn the emotional, spiritual and physical health benefits of spiritual practices as well as the therapeutic skills necessary to integrate spirituality into clinical practice. Students intellectually study and experientially practice several spiritual techniques and create ritual and ceremony to assist them in becoming effective integrative Mind-Body Medicine practitioners. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: SU Term A. Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5640 - Psychophysiology


    This course introduces the scientific study of psychophysiology, and a variety of approaches to investigating mind-body phenomena. The course reviews the psychophysiology of the human stress response, and the applied fields of cardiovascular behavioral medicine and psychoneuroimmunology. Students will learn basic principles in psychophysiology and review psychophysiological research on several systems in the body. Students will learn a variety of research strategies for investigating mind-body interactions, including the use of psychophysiological monitoring, neuro-imaging, and biological markers, such as salivary cortisol, Interleukin 1-B, and blood sugar. Students will review representative research studies in several areas of psychophysiology, understand the research strategies, and learn to critically evaluate the research findings. Students will complete a research paper on a self-selected topic in psychophysiology. The course offers an opportunity to explore mind-body relationships through an overview of theory and a review of empirical findings. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: SU - Term. Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC.
  
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    MBM 5645 - The Human Energy Field and Energy Medicine


    This course explores health and healing according to an energetic perspective that has roots in ancient healing practices. Today this field, known as energy medicine, is experiencing rapid growth, including a proliferation of energetic therapies and an accumulation of research. An overview of the human energy field and a presentation of some of the key energy medicine modalities, both diagnostic and therapeutic, constitute most of the course. The course reviews the main systems of energy medicine from indigenous medicine, including hands-on and distant healing, the energetics of Oriental medicine and Ayurveda, homeopathy, healing with light and color, and sound therapy, as well as historical and philosophical concepts of a life energy. The course also examines contemporary modalities and their scientific foundations including electromagnetic field applications, phototherapy, energy psychology, and measurement of subtle energies and bioenergetic effects. The biofield, the role of emotions and conscious intent, and living systems theory are developed as scientific explanatory concepts underlying energy medicine. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: SU - Term A. Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5655 - Mindfulness and Meditation in Health


    Mindfulness is the ability to have non-judgmental awareness of events as they unfold moment by moment. Mindfulness is a fundamental and ancient component of many Eastern and Western spiritual traditions. In recent years, there has been substantial research on the use of mindfulness in the treatment of medical conditions and mental disorders, as well as its application in healthcare, education and the workplace. This course is both theoretical and experiential. Students learn about and discuss the origins of mindfulness practices, the modern scientific underpinnings of mindfulness research, and multiple applications of mindfulness in medicine, healthcare and society. Students learn and are supported in the personal development of a simple mindfulness practice. Students’ personal experiences are the basis for understanding mindfulness as a tool for stress management, self awareness and self efficacy. Students are also be encouraged to assess the appropriateness of mindfulness in their own lives as a spiritual practice and a way of life. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA - Term A. Course Length: 8 Weeks. RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5660 - Foundations of Integrative Mental Health


    This course introduces mental health professionals to the conceptual foundations and practical clinical methods of integrative mental health care. The course begins with a review of trends and perceptions in complementary, alternative, and integrative healthcare and how they are affecting the practice of mental healthcare. The intersecting movements of integrated care and integrative mental healthcare will be introduced. We then discuss emerging paradigms in biomedicine and non-allopathic systems of medicine, the basic sciences and consciousness research, and implications for the evolution and future of mental healthcare. Practical issues in integrative mental healthcare are then discussed including safety, cost, ethical, and legal issues. The course concludes with a review of emerging methodologies in research and clinical practice focusing on practical issues involved in planning assessment and treatment in integrative mental healthcare. At the end of this course students will understand the foundations of integrative mental healthcare and be able to develop effective, safe, and appropriate integrative strategies for evaluating and treating common mental health problems. The content of this course assumes no prior specialized knowledge or training and is intended for doctoral-level psychologists, social workers, and other mental health professionals. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA - Term A, SP - Term A. Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5661 - Nutritional Foundations of Mental Health


    This course provides an overview of the practical and scientific approaches to understanding the impact that food has on mental health. Topics in this course will include learning about the quality and variety of food that is available to us, its impact on mental health, and the influence that nutrition has on brain development and maintenance throughout the life cycle. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5660 . 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA - Term B. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5662 - Whole Medical Systems: Traditional Chinese Medicine and Ayurveda


    This course provides an overview of Chinese and Indian medical traditions. The course provides an opportunity for students to study Chinese Medicine and Ayurveda, and consider the relationship between these traditional medical systems and biomedicine. Students study the conceptual paradigm of each system, historical foundations, the typical physician-patient relationship, commonly used interventions in current practice, and available outcome studies assessing efficacy for common mental health disorders. This course includes a two day residential component, video conferences with faculty and students, and online discussion of assigned readings. This course will specifically look at medical traditions from the perspective of culture, including systematic correspondence and philosophical structures. How do early medical systems describe the natural world? The image of the body? Holism? What are the characteristics of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Ayurveda that inform and contribute to the modern concept of wellness? Special emphasis will be placed on the psycho-emotional aspects of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Ayurveda. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SU - Term A. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5663 - Advanced Integrative Psychotherapy


    The Advanced Integrative Psychotherapy course provides advanced, leading-edge perspectives on mind-body medicine and integrative health. The course honors  a biopsychosocial-spiritual perspective to psychotherapeutic care. It gives respectful attention to an expanded cartography of the human psyche, to its architecture and its rich experiential territories, and to the healing potentials of the non-ordinary (expanded) states of consciousness. In addition, the course (a) employs a character-based, archetypally-informed developmental model of human personality and (b) explores advanced, archetypally-informed integrative psychotherapeutic interventions and ways of tending to the mind-body-psyche during various psychospiritual processes, including spiritual emergence and spiritual emergencies. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5660  and student must be a licensed mental health care practitioner to enroll. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: SP - Term B. Course Length: 8 Weeks. RC Required in Term A.
  
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    MBM 5664 - Somatics: Body-Oriented Approaches to Mental Health


    The field of somatics includes diverse modalities, some focused on healing disease or trauma, while others direct their attention to the promotion of well-being through awareness and integration for those with or without a specific diagnosis. Some approaches are primarily physical, though they may enter emotional and psychological realms as the memories and experiences stored in the body are touched and released. Other approaches, often referred to as somatic psychotherapy, purposely use the pathway of connection with the body to approach psychological issues. This 8-module course provides students with a basic skill-set to bring a somatic focus to their therapy sessions along with introductory knowledge about the concepts and approaches of several somatic modalities. Students will explore experiential exercises from some of the techniques with each other and with a volunteer, as well as studying the history and theories underlying these practices and the research done on these mind-body approaches to healing and well-being. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA - Term B. Course Length: 8 Weeks. RC Required in Term A.
  
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    MBM 5669 - Traditional Chinese Medicine


    This course provides an overview of Chinese medical traditions, including the 20th century compilation of Chinese medicine labeled Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). The course provides an opportunity for students to study Chinese medicine broadly, and examine the emerging research on the efficacy of Chinese herbal remedies and other therapeutic interventions. Students study the conceptual paradigm of Chinese medicine, historical foundations, the typical physician-patient relationship, and commonly used interventions in current practice.  The course will emphasize the psycho-emotional aspects of Traditional Chinese Medicine and available outcome studies assessing efficacy for common mental health disorders. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: SU- Term A Course Length: 8 Weeks No RC Required
  
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    MBM 5671 - Advanced Nutritional Biochemistry


    Nutritional biochemistry is the study of nutrition and metabolism on the cellular and molecular level. Clinicians involved in integrative and functional nutrition therapy must become well versed in nutritional biochemistry in order to understand the importance of nutrients in the functions of metabolic pathways and networks, as well as their role in clinical imbalances and the pathway to aging and pathology. This course introduces the concepts in the IFMNT radial to link cellular and molecular metabolism with the integrative and functional nutrition care process. This course prepares students for MBM 5678  that will incorporate nutrition and cellular metabolism with systems biology/physiology, genetics, and biochemical individuality. Prerequisite(s): General Biochemistry. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered SP - Term B and Fall - Term B. Course Length: Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: Relevant Learning Outcomes: 2 (3), 2.3 (2)
  
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    MBM 5674 - Ayurvedic Medicine


    This course provides an overview of the medical traditions and medical practices of India. The course provides an opportunity for students to study Ayurveda as a lifestyle and as a healing tradition, and to consider the relationship between Ayurvedic medicine and Western biomedicine. Students study the conceptual paradigm of Ayurveda, historical foundations, the typical physician-patient relationship, and commonly used interventions in current practice. What are the characteristics of Ayurveda that can inform and contribute to the modern concept of wellness? Special emphasis will be placed on the psycho-emotional aspects of Traditional Ayurveda, and available outcome studies assessing efficacy for common mental health disorders. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: SU- Term A Course Length: 8 Weeks No RC Required
  
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    MBM 5690 - Complementary and Integrative Medicine


    The Complementary and Integrative Medicine course extends and deepens the student’s understanding of integrative medicine and health. The course reviews the professions that comprise complementary and integrative medicine and health, the treatments they provide, and their fields of practice. Several of these professions developed originally as autonomous approaches to health and healing, yet now lend themselves to a collaborative and integrative treatment approach. The 21st century patient may benefit from the most advanced mainstream medical care, supplemented by treatments adapted from any of the complementary professions. Among these professions are: naturopathy, homeopathy, chiropractic medicine, energy medicine and energy psychology, Traditional Chinese Medicine and acupuncture, Ayurveda and massage therapy and bodywork. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: FA/SP - Term B. Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC.
  
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    MBM 8100 - Independent Study


    This course facilitates an individualized course of study for a student, outside the standard curriculum. The independent study course enables a student to pursue an individualized topic with an instructor, based on a learning contract established in dialogue between the student and the instructor, and approved by the Program Director. The credit load for this course is also negotiated between the student and the instructor, and approved by the Department Chair. The student must complete approximately 45 hours of directed studies for each assigned credit hour. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 1-4 credit(s)
    Offered: All terms. Course Length: 8 Weeks/16 weeks No RC Required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: To be negotiated by student and instructor.
  
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    MBM 9401 - MS Thesis Research


    Students enrolled in a CIMHS master’s degree must seek an approval from the Department Chair to substitute the final Capstone Seminar course with MS Thesis Research.  Once approved, students will have to fulfill the prerequisite research course before enrolling.  Students opting to conduct a thesis will form a two-person research committee, consisting of a chair and methodologist or subject matter expert. Expectations include (a) developing a proposal for a research-based thesis in the field of mind-body medicine, integrative health, or related field; (b) presenting the proposal to the research committee for approval; (c) submitting an application to and seeking approval from Saybrook’s Institutional Review Board (IRB) to conduct the proposed study; (d) implementing the research; (e) preparing a written thesis document summarizing the research design, implementation process, and research findings; and (f) presenting the research to the committee via videoconference.  The committee must approve the oral presentation and final document.  (MS Theses involve human subjects as participants or key/expert informants). Prerequisite(s): MBM 5557   3 credit(s)
    Offered: All terms. Course Length: Varies. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 9501 - PhD Dissertation Proposal


    The student forms a doctoral dissertation committee, composed of a chair and two committee members, including faculty members with relevant area knowledge or research knowledge. Working closely with the dissertation chair, the student develops a dissertation proposal, which is reviewed and approved by the committee. Prerequisite(s): All required coursework for degree and approved petition to form committee. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: All terms. Course Length: Continues each term until the research committee approves the oral presentation and proposal document. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 9601 - PhD Dissertation Research


    The student obtains approval of the Saybrook Institutional Review Board to conduct the research, following guidelines to protect any human participants in the research. The student works closely with the chair and the committee to execute the research, analyze any resulting data, and formulate a written dissertation document. The dissertation process culminates with a dissertation conference and approval of the final document. Prerequisite(s): All required coursework and MBM 9501 . 3 credit(s)
    Offered: All terms. No RC Required.

Marriage & Family Therapy and Professional Clinical Counseling

  
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    COUN 2538 - Aging and Long-Term Care


    The course goal is to broaden understanding and develop effective approaches to individual and social issues associated with aging. The course emphasizes a multi-perspective approach to aging and the challenges an aging population presents to administrators and clinicians. The course explores interventions associated with aging, mentoring in society, the renewal of eldership in society, and a paradigm for aging in place. 10 Contact Hours; 0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2539 - Child and Elder Abuse Assessment and Reporting


    This course will review the signs of physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse and neglect, with special attention to cultural context. The course is designed to satisfy Child Abuse Assessment and Reporting for MFT and Clinical Psychology (7 contact hours) and requirements for MFT licensure (3 contact hours) covering issues of elder abuse with additional emphasis on financial abuse. 10 Contact Hours; 0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2544 - Mental Health Recovery


    This workshop provides developing clinicians with a broader and deeper understanding of those they will be serving. By inviting mental health advocates to join the conversation, stigma and stereotypes are identified and addressed. Cultural competency, recovery-oriented care, resiliency, case management, and systems of care are emphasized. 10 Contact Hours; 0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2639 - Special Populations: Severe Mental Illness & Developmental Disorders.


    Focusing on selected populations, these courses provide overview of pertinent research and clinical issues for clinicians. 1 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2640 - Special Populations: Partner Abuse and Domestic Violence.


    Focusing on selected populations, these courses provide overview of pertinent research and clinical issues for clinicians. 1 credit(s)
  
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    MFT 2011 - Advanced Systems Theory


    This course provides an in-depth study of systems theories and transformational models applicable to community and family life. Students will learn to think in systems terms on a number of levels across a wide variety of family structures and a range of presenting problems, taking into account external societal influences. Skills in systemic and transformational interventions within an intercultural context will be acquired. 3 credit(s)
  
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    MFT 2533 - Special Populations: Working with Couples and Families.


    Focusing on selected populations, these courses provide overview of pertinent research and clinical issues for clinicians. 1 credit(s)
  
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    MFT 2540 - Advanced Couples Therapy


    This course is designed for study in greater depth of major theories of couple relationships and relevant issues arising in partnering and parenting. The course emphasizes clinical skills and therapeutic interventions for working with couples in clinical and community settings. 3 credit(s)
  
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    MFT 2542 - Mental Health Services Act


    This workshop provides resources to support county mental health programs for children, youth, adults, elders, and families in a continuum of prevention, early intervention, community services, and collaborative support. Intervention approaches emphasize cultural competency, consumer and family inclusion, wellness and recovery models of care. 10 Contact Hours; 0 credit(s)
  
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    MFT 2550 - Advanced Family Therapy


    This course is designed for study in greater depth of major theories of family therapy and relevant issues arising in intergenerational relationships. The course emphasizes clinical skills and therapeutic interventions for working with families in clinical and community settings. 3 credit(s)
  
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    MFT 2627 - Special Populations: Work with the Older Generation.


    Focusing on selected populations, these courses provide overview of pertinent research and clinical issues for clinicians. 1 credit(s)
  
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    MFT 2641 - Special Populations: Working with Children and Adolescents.


    Focusing on selected populations, these courses provide overview of pertinent research and clinical issues for clinicians. 1 credit(s)
  
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    MFT 2642 - Special Populations: Diversity in Social and Cultural Context.


    Focusing on selected populations, these courses provide overview of pertinent research and clinical issues for clinicians. 1 credit(s)
  
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    MFT 6530 - Domestic Violence: Abuse in Intimate Relationships


    This course provides an overview of intimate partner violence, the development of violence against women as a social issue, and the responses developed by activists, therapists, and community and government agencies. It covers important issues and controversies, including obstacles in determining rates of prevalence; theories and research about causation, especially with regard to gender and culture; and individual and societal intervention and prevention efforts. Understanding these topics is important for advocates, community organizers, and researchers and demonstrating competency in many of these areas is required by various licensing boards for therapists and counselors. Students can focus on research and/or practice in various areas: men’s violence against women, female perpetrators, same sex or adolescent relationship violence, victim and family services, programs for perpetrators, and community-based prevention programs. 3 credit(s)

Organizational Systems

  
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    ORG 0700 - Academic Writing Support


    Academic Writing is a one-credit tutorial that provides substantive support for students seeking to develop writing skills that allow them to meet APA and graduate-level standards. Recognizing that students have diverse needs, the course has been structured to be flexible enough to accommodate each student’s experience and needs by offering three writing approaches: process, product, and personal voice. Enrollment can be by student’s choice, required at admission, or recommended to the student by course instructors at any time during the program. Students may take up to 3 credits of Academic Writing over the duration of their program at Saybrook University. Enrollments beyond the 3-credit limit will be on a noncredit basis only. 1 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 0701 - Academic Writing Support


    Academic Writing is a one-credit tutorial that provides substantive support for students seeking to develop writing skills that allow them to meet APA and graduate-level standards. Recognizing that students have diverse needs, the course has been structured to be flexible enough to accommodate each student’s experience and needs by offering three writing approaches: process, product, and personal voice. Enrollment can be by student’s choice, required at admission, or recommended to the student by course instructors at any time during the program. Students may take up to 3 credits of Academic Writing over the duration of their program at Saybrook University. Enrollments beyond the 3-credit limit will be on a noncredit basis only. 1 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 0702 - Academic Writing Support


    Academic Writing is a one-credit tutorial that provides substantive support for students seeking to develop writing skills that allow them to meet APA and graduate-level standards. Recognizing that students have diverse needs, the course has been structured to be flexible enough to accommodate each student’s experience and needs by offering three writing approaches: process, product, and personal voice. Enrollment can be by student’s choice, required at admission, or recommended to the student by course instructors at any time during the program. Students may take up to 3 credits of Academic Writing over the duration of their program at Saybrook University. Enrollments beyond the 3-credit limit will be on a noncredit basis only. 1 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 0703 - Academic Writing Support


    Academic Writing is a one-credit tutorial that provides substantive support for students seeking to develop writing skills that allow them to meet APA and graduate-level standards. Recognizing that students have diverse needs, the course has been structured to be flexible enough to accommodate each student’s experience and needs by offering three writing approaches: process, product, and personal voice. Enrollment can be by student’s choice, required at admission, or recommended to the student by course instructors at any time during the program. Students may take up to 3 credits of Academic Writing over the duration of their program at Saybrook University. Enrollments beyond the 3-credit limit will be on a noncredit basis only. 1 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 0704 - Academic Writing Support


    Academic Writing is a one-credit tutorial that provides substantive support for students seeking to develop writing skills that allow them to meet APA and graduate-level standards. Recognizing that students have diverse needs, the course has been structured to be flexible enough to accommodate each student’s experience and needs by offering three writing approaches: process, product, and personal voice. Enrollment can be by student’s choice, required at admission, or recommended to the student by course instructors at any time during the program. Students may take up to 3 credits of Academic Writing over the duration of their program at Saybrook University. Enrollments beyond the 3-credit limit will be on a noncredit basis only. 1 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 0705 - Academic Writing Support


    Academic Writing is a one-credit tutorial that provides substantive support for students seeking to develop writing skills that allow them to meet APA and graduate-level standards. Recognizing that students have diverse needs, the course has been structured to be flexible enough to accommodate each student’s experience and needs by offering three writing approaches: process, product, and personal voice. Enrollment can be by student’s choice, required at admission, or recommended to the student by course instructors at any time during the program. Students may take up to 3 credits of Academic Writing over the duration of their program at Saybrook University. Enrollments beyond the 3-credit limit will be on a noncredit basis only. 1 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 7006 - Sociotechnical Information Systems and Distributed Organizations: Organizational Communication, Information Flow, and Technology


    This interdisciplinary course explores organizations as dynamic global enterprises which weave together people and technology into self-organizing, interactive networks. Students examine how digital technology has a) changed the nature and dynamics of socio-technical systems, b) transformed organizational information systems and enterprise wide knowledge generation and application, and c) reshaped organizational cultures, workplace operations, business partnerships, and supply chains. Central to this course is enabling students to develop their own socio-technical organizational model, and devise approaches to effectively design, implement and manage technological information and communication systems that enhance the quality of both organizational performance and work life. Intermediate level course.  3 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 7025 - Humanistic Foundations of Organizational Development


    This course is an introduction to the origins and evolution of Organizational Development (OD). OD grew into early coherence in the late 1950s and early 1960s, arising from the same antecedents as humanistic psychology. It is practiced today, in many forms, around the entire globe. This course provides readings and writing assignments that serve as a vehicle for becoming more appreciative of the core values and the historical roots of OD theory and practice and its long-standing humanistic tradition. 3 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 7028 - Talent Development and Strategic Human Resource Management


    Central to business organization success is its talent, its multifaceted workforce. Organizational leaders must consciously leverage their human resources, unleash their workforce’s creativity, and tap into their organization’s intellectual capital. This course drawing upon various disciplines including organizational psychology critically discusses both domestic and critical international human resource management concepts, principles, practices, issues, and challenges, as well as the core characteristics and practices of engaging workplaces and the attributes of the current global organizations that are rated the best places to work. Students develop their own human resource or talent development vision, as well as their core best practices. 3 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 7030 - Envisioning and Managing Contemporary Organizations


    The contemporary organization is a complex enterprise requiring managers to engage with and lead a global workforce and facilitate dynamic social networks utilizing various forms of communication and collaboration technology platforms. Using various analytical lenses this interdisciplinary course critically examines core distributed organizational characteristics, behaviors, dynamics and issues, as well as management approaches shaped by social systems, intra and inter organizational networks, and cross-cultural perspectives. Particular attention is given to exploring innovative organizational structures, cultures, operational processes, workplace environments, and sociotechnical communication systems founded in human-centric workplace and information systems principles. 3 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 7032 - Analyzing Complex Organizational Situations: A Systems Perspective


    With organizations as the focus, this introductory course provides students with a first look at systems thinking as an approach to understand complexity and identify leverage points for intervention. Through both theory and practice, students will learn to recognize the systemic nature of complex phenomena (at the personal, organizational and societal levels) and develop systems models as a way to develop deeper understanding and communicate more effectively the interconnectedness of a social system and its implications for improvement and transformation. Systems thinking is a foundation for both understanding the current state as well as for designing the future of complex social systems and institutions in the private, public and social sectors. 3 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 7035 - Sustainable Economics and Supply Chains


    Global economies are interdependent challenging businesses to operate in a competitive but sustainable manner that benefits a diverse set of stakeholders, does not exploit or harm the environment, and provides for the development of a sustainable future for the generations that follow. Critically examining existing economic systems, business operation practices, and marketing strategies, this courses enable students to envision innovative economic systems that lead to the emergence of new business strategies, financial management principles, collaborative forms of inter-organizational partnerships and alliances, and sustainable operational processes. This includes discussing new approaches to gaining and serving global markets, managing global supply chains, and reaching business goals. 3 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 7036 - Strategic Management, Data Analysis & Decision Making: A Systems Perspective


    With strategic analysis, planning, decision making, and organizational alignment in distributed organizations as the core focus, this interdisciplinary course enables students to expand their practical skills as strategic leaders and managers who face complex situations and have to make challenging decisions which have far-reaching economic ramifications for organizations, as well as the well-being of society and the environment. Particular attention is given to planning processes, implementing and evaluating organizational strategic initiatives, and to gathering and analyzing data from a systems perspective. 3 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 7037 - Transformative Learning


    The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the exciting body of work that resides within the community of scholars interested in understanding transformative learning on the individual, community, and organizational level. Sparked by the theory of Jack Mezirow, this field incorporates the work of Freire, Haberma.s, Kegan, Cranton, and others who seek to understand and facilitate learning that results a significant perspective shift in individuals, and cultural and paradigm shifts at collective levels. This course enables you to apply your understanding of the importance of the encounter with the “other” and the role of language to creating the conditions for transformative learning in organizations. 3 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 7040 - Organizations and Social Systems Design


    Focusing on organizations, this course explores Social Systems Design as developed by Banathy, Ackoff and others. Social systems design is a participatory, collaborative and disciplined way of engaging in future creating inquiry. The learner will address questions such as: What is design in a social context? What is a design culture and how does it relate to the sciences, the humanities, and organizational behavior and development? Building upon these notions, the course will also examine: How do organizations and workplaces respond to change? How organizational managers can facilitate the design of social systems in their enterprises? Design principles such as “form follows function, and the ethics of designing with those that will live the consequences of the choices made are explored. Social Systems Design shares core assumptions with participatory action research. The learner will be able to explore the usefulness of social systems design for the creation of new organizations or for the transformation of existing ones. 3 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 7042 - From Evolutionary Consciousness to Conscious Evolution


    This course engages a systemic understanding of evolution with the possibility of engaging in conscious evolution at the socio-cultural level. Three levels of inquiry are introduces: First, at the individual level, the notion of Evolutionary Leadership in introduced to connect the learning needs to develop mental models, skills and sensitivities necessary to enable evolutionary inquiry. Second, at the community and organizational level, Evolutionary Learning Communities are explored as spaces where evolutionary leaders can come together to engage in dialogue, learning, design and action. Lastly, at the societal level, the notion of Evolutionary Development is explored as a framework for conceptualizing and linking diverse strategies to enable systemic transformation and conscious evolution. This course is a space to explore what lies beyond sustainability as well as to contextualize in a wide and expansive view of change the work that the learner is committed to do as an organizational systems scholar-practitioner. 3 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 7044 - Communication, Generative Dialogue, and Strategic Discourse


    Drawing upon various scholars (including Isaacs, Bohm and Deetz) and practitioners who are exploring the communication challenges of the contemporary globally distributed organization, this course critically examines communication concepts, practices and issues found in organizations. Among the many topics discussed are communication theories, generative dialogue, cross-cultural communication, social media, stakeholder dialogue, strategic dialogue, and knowledge sharing methods. 3 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 7045 - Critical Systems Inquiry, Ethics and Social Responsibility


    Leading and making responsible decisions today are complex and challenging ventures. With a human development and capabilities perspective and a foundation in stakeholder principles, this interdisciplinary course critically explores organizational integrity and professional ethics and examines the workplace and wider social challenges faced daily by organizational professionals in the business, nonprofit, and government arenas. Central to this course are the refinement of students’ professional and organizational ethics viewpoints, development of new corporate social responsibility models and practices, and how to thoughtfully integrate social justice and sustainability principles into organizational operations and decision making. 3 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 7052 - Systems Based Approaches to Participatory Change


    This course contextualizes the Saybrook legacy around the work of Banathy on social systems design and modeling within the richer lineage of systems science in general and soft systems thinking in particular. The work of seminal social systems thinkers such as Ackoff on idealized systems design, Checkland on soft systems methodology, and Jackson on emancipatory and critical systems thinking will be explored to gain a wider and richer understanding of the diversity and complementarity of systems based approaches to participatory change. Soft systems thinking, as a branch of systems science, considers social and organizational systems as “purposeful systems,” i.e., complex human activity systems capable of defining their own purpose and creating their future by embracing human will, values and issues of diversity and inclusion at the core of the inquiry. 3 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 7055 - Theory and Practice of Appreciative Inquiry


    Appreciative Inquiry is an approach to working within organizations that utilizes a positive theory of change. As an alternative to a problem solving approach, AI is a co-evolutionary search to bring forth the best in people and organizational systems. This course provides a theoretical and practical understanding of AI to support its application in multiple contexts. The course also offers a critical view of how AI resides within the context of other interpretative theories and participative change methodologies such as Action Research. 3 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 7065 - Family Business Consulting


    (offered by request only) The course explores the personal, business and interpersonal issues that pertain to growing up within, owning and managing a family business. It is a course about business, but about how personal and family issues impact on the business, and how the personal and the business aspects of life can work in harmony. The course will allow students to connect personal concerns to business issues, to see how the personal dimension affects the conduct of business, and to learn how to move between a personal and a business perspective. It is meant for students who have been, or who may become, part of a family business, or who as consultants or professionals, will be working with clients who are operating family businesses. 3 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 7070 - Leading Organizational Innovation, Change, and Transformation


    This course critically examines both how transformative organizational change can be conceptualized and how the theories and models that support its planning and process development can be implemented. It investigates how leaders who initiate and direct major organizational shifts can mobilize, focus, generate commitment, and implement new directions in an organization. The course combines theory, case material, models and accounts of how and why organizations change their cultures, purposes, structures, and/or operational processes. Students will undertake a detailed analysis of an organizational change they have experienced, or one they have access to through interviews. Intermediate level course. 3 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 7072 - Managing Collaborative Systems in a Global Workplace: Teams, Collaborative Systems, and Networks


    With organizational communication models and globally distributed enterprises as the backdrop, this course examines various approaches to understanding and developing collaboration in organizations.  Envisioning organizations as complex global systems, students examine contemporary models and practical dynamics of teams, social networks, partnerships and communities of practice. In light of current technological advancements, this interdisciplinary course will also discuss dispersed organizational structures and workforce environments, including telework, virtual teams, and workplace connectivity, and how to effectively lead and engage workers as a distance manager.  Students complete an analysis of a team or social network which results in making recommendations on how to revise and enhance operational dynamics and processes. Intermediate level course. 3 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 7073 - Executive Coaching


    This course offers a thoughtful, reflective, professional approach to one type of coaching-the coaching of organizational leaders. Students learn concepts, models and practices they can apply in management or consulting positions. Personal assessment instruments such as 360 are discussed as means to support development. Students engage in coaching pairs throughout the course to practice the development of skills and to gain insight into their strengths and areas for improvement. 3 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 7074 - Present Issues in Sustainability


    Sustainability is a broad topic rooted in social justice, human rights, global equity, and ecological stability and flourishing. Thus, it has many dimensions and applies to many aspects of organizational operations and social functioning. This interdisciplinary course builds upon principles and issues explored in ORG 7045. It critically examines the present state of affairs in the business, economic, social, political and environmental arenas with respect to the challenges they pose to the global ecosystem, business enterprises and their workplaces, societies and nation states, as well as the injustice they are creating and the consequences they have for our collective future. The course explores the intricate links among business operations, economic activity, social dynamics and the natural environment. Students will learn to describe ways in which organizations of all kinds can more effectively address these interactions. 3 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 7075 - Designing Sustainable Global Economic and Organizational Systems


    This interdisciplinary course critically examines the current global economic order in light of a range of economic theories, including the human development and capabilities approach (economics as development), social economics, behavioral economics, etc. A central focus of the course is to envision how professionals from all sectors can collaboratively contribute meaningfully and significantly to the emergence of a sustainable and livable future for all.  This course provides students an interdisciplinary learning experience that guides them in understanding and analyzing current mainstream and alternative economic models, to envision new ones rooted in the human development and capabilities approach, sustainability principles, and social justice, to devise ways to practically implement them in organizations, and to design ways to facilitate economic change in the wider global arena. 3 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 7078 - Sustainable Management and Organizational Operations: Emerging Models, Practices, and Strategies


    In general, organizations are challenged to operate in a more equitable and sustainable manner. Then there are social entrepreneurs who focus on addressing global issues. Other establish and manage benefit corporations. This course critically examines current and emerging sustainable business and community models, and practices in light of organizational stakeholder needs, community engagement, and the future social ramifications of a business’ operation. It presents models, challenges, opportunities and practices for managing sustainability inside corporate and non-profit organizations, including the product life cycle, accountability and reporting frameworks. It also explores approaches to social entrepreneurship and being a benefit corporation. It concludes by students designing a sustainable organization model and a start-up business plan. 3 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 7080 - Consulting Skills


    Consulting Skills explores the nature of consulting as a learning and helping process between an individual and a group, focusing on the interpersonal skills and processes that make up the helping process. This course uses classic works from Peter Block and Edgar Schein as well as action research as a framework for the consulting process. Students learn how to contract, construct an inquiry or assessment process, engage in and with an organizational system, design processes appropriate to the organizational need, and provide feedback systems to ensure that learning and development is sustained. 3 credit(s)
  
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    ORG 7081 - Leading Organizational Learning and Advancement: Adaptive and Integrative


    Engaging in a generative dialogue, this course critically examines the many divergent perspectives on leadership and organizational development in search of innovative ways to support continued organizational learning and growth of contemporary organizations which exist in complex global situations and need to function in a sustainable manner. Foundational to this search is the perspective that leadership is a phenomenon that requires multiple levels of analysis. This interdisciplinary course draw upon many points of view including adaptive leadership principles, learning organization models, integrative perspectives of organizations and leadership, adult development theory, and social systems theory. 3 credit(s)
 

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