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2017-2018 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook with Summer Addendum
Saybrook University
   
 
  Sep 23, 2019
 
2017-2018 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook with Summer Addendum 
    
2017-2018 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook with Summer Addendum [Archived Catalog]

Course Descriptions


Courses are identified and organized by degree program. Listed below are those courses that may be offered through the Department of Humanistic & Clinical Psychology for the Psychology degree program as well as the Human Science degree program for the 2015-2016 academic school year. CampusVue will list courses open for enrollment each semester, by Section if applicable.

Courses are identified and organized by degree programs: Clinical Psychology, PhD. Courses listed are offered as online cohort (CO), residential (R), or individually-mentored online (IO). Not all courses are offered every semester. See Program Descriptions and Requirements section of the College of Social Sciences section of this catalog and the Saybrook University website for updates and/or changes to courses.

 

Other Courses

  
  •  

    COA 5593 - Advanced Coaching Practicum


    In this final skills and competencies development course in the coaching curriculum, students will engage in twelve experiential coaching sessions with 2-4 practice clients. This advanced coaching practicum provides students with the opportunity to utilize and improve their spectrum of integrative wellness coaching skills within their specific coaching niche. Students will receive weekly faculty supervision and peer coaching support via videoconference, mentoring, and online discussions. This is the third of three required courses in the Integrative Wellness Coaching Certificate program. 3.0 credits.

      Prerequisite(s): COA 5628 , or MBM5629 or MBM5630 and COA 5632  

     

      COA 5632  

    COA 5628 , or MBM 5629 , or MBM 5630 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term A/B (Offering depends upon enrollment numbers) Course Length: 16 weeks No RC required


Other Courses

  
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    COA 5628 - Evidence-Based Coaching


    This course presents a comprehensive overview of the foundational coaching competencies and skills as defined by the International Coach Federation (ICF), International Consortium for Health and Wellness Coaching (ICHWC), and Center for Credentialing and Education (Board Certified Coach).  Throughout the duration of the course, students will (a) learn about the similarities and differences between coaching, counseling, and consulting; (b) apply the coaching framework and skills to facilitate effective coaching conversations and processes; (c) review the theories and evidence-based approaches that support the coaching process and its outcomes; and (d) discuss career opportunities within the coaching profession.  This is the first of three required courses in the Integrative Wellness Coaching Certificate program.  3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: SP-Term A Course Length: 8 weeks RC required

Other Courses

  
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    COA 5632 - Intermediate Coaching


    This intermediate level coaching course is designed to strengthen the core coaching competencies taught in the foundational COA 5628 Evidence-Based Coaching course.  Throughout the 8-week term, students will (a) discuss and practice intermediate coaching skills and competencies , (b) identify and use various health and wellness assessments related to coaching, (c) identify opportunities and approaches to integrate mind-body-spirit techniques within coaching sessions, (d) strengthen self-coaching skills and self-care practices, and (e) investigate coaching opportunities within the integrative healthcare field (e.g., medical, community health and wellness, private practice, corporate wellness). This is the second of three required courses in the Integrative Wellness Coaching Certificate program. Prerequisite(s): COA 5628  or MBM 5629  or MBM 5630 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: SU - Term A Course Length: 8 weeks No RC required

Other Courses

  
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    COA 5633 - MA Capstone Seminar in Integrative Wellness Coaching


    In this culminating course, students will synthesize their knowledge of coaching theories and integrative wellness practices in a final capstone essay. Students will also develop and present a strategic plan that describes the evidence-based coaching approach or program that they intend to implement within their respective profession. This pragmatic orientation to business and career planning will prepare individuals to answer important questions related to their future career in the integrative health field. All required CIMHS courses in the MA in Integrative Wellness Coaching degree.  Any exceptions must be approved by the Program Director 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Any Term Course Length: 8 Weeks No RC Required

Other Courses

  
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    COA 5700 - Foundations of Lifestyle Medicine


    This course presents a comprehensive overview of lifestyle medicine and optimizing pathways toward greater wellbeing. In this foundations course, students will be introduced to holistic approaches to assess and implement various dimensions of wellness. Each week, students will explore a new dimension of wellness by reviewing and critiquing relevant literature and assessment on the topic. This class is fundamental for students preparing for a career in health promotion, lifestyle medicine, and wellness coaching, programming, and consulting.  3 credits.

      3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA/SP - Term A Course Length: 8 Weeks No RC Required


Other Courses

  
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    COA 5705 - Positive Psychology Applications in Coaching


    Students will learn about and apply the primary coaching theories within positive psychology to enhance their work with individuals and organizations focusing on human strengths and values, eudemonic wellbeing, and quality of life. This course emphasizes the psychosocial underpinnings related to human flourishing as well as empirically validated assessments and interventions to use with coaching clients in various settings. Finally, students will be presented with coaching tools for empowering individuals towards optimal wellbeing, engagement, and productivity.   COA 5628  and 5705 RC participation, or certification in coaching from another program with approval of Program Director 3 credit(s)
    Offered: SP - Term B Course Length: 8 Weeks No RC Required

Other Courses

  
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    COA 8100 - Independent Study


    The independent study course enables a student to pursue an individualized topic with an approved faculty instructor.  The subject must be relevant to the coaching profession and coaching applications; in addition, it must include subject matter not included in the curriculum.  Students are advised to contact the Registrar’s Office to ask for an Independent Study Request Form.  The instructor and student will negotiate specify course learning objectives, required and/or recommended readings, and assignments.  The course credits assigned will depend on the quantity of work established in the learning contract (e.g., 1-credit is equivalent to 45 hours of work).  When the form is complete, seek approval from the Program Director. NONE 1-4 credit(s)
    Offered: Any Term Course Length: 8 or 16 weeks No RC required Relevant Learning Outcomes: To be defined in the Independent Study Request Form

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5514 - Virtual Community in Nutrition


    This semester-long course introduces students to Saybrook University, the Integrative & Functional Nutrition Program, and each other.  Students will become acclimated to Saybrook’s on-line learning environment while developing best practices for student success as they learn about a variety of topics in nutrition, health, and wellness.  Through active exploration of contemporary integrative health issues, students will be challenged to question their preconceived theories, consider opposing perspectives, and theorize about topics from a more global and humanistic perspective. Prerequisite(s): None 1.0 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term A/B and SP-Term A/B Course Length: 16 weeks No RC required

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5520 - Nutritional Science


    Overview of the  fundamentals of nutrition science, including the physiological processes of digestion, absorption, and metabolism of essential nutrients; the basic chemical structures, functions, requirements, and food sources of nutrients; and the causes and consequences of nutrient deficiencies and toxicities.  This course is required for IFN students who have not had at least three credits of a college or graduate-level nutrition science course prior to admission. Prerequisite(s): None 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term A and SP-Term A Course Length: 8 weeks No RC required

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5611 - Therapeutic Diets and Menu Planning


    This course explores the use of whole foods, traditional dietary patterns, and therapeutic meal plans to prevent and treat health concerns. Students learn when and how to apply the science of “food as medicine” by reviewing research supporting health outcomes from therapeutic diets. Students develop, analyze and share practical whole-foods based menus and recipes that comply with the dietary instructions of restrictive diets, exchanged-based diets, elimination diets and cultural meal patterns.  Knowledge areas explored include benefits of bioactive food compounds, effects of acculturation on diet and health, sustainable food production, and economic and social constraints of healthy diets.   Prerequisite(s): IFN 5520  (or evidence of college-level nutrition course) 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: SU-Term A Course Length: 8 weeks None

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5661 - Nutritional Foundations of Mental Health


    This course provides an overview of the practical and scientific approaches to understanding the impact that food has on mental health. Topics in this course will include learning about the quality and variety of food that is available to us, its impact on mental health, and the influence that nutrition has on brain development and maintenance throughout the life cycle. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5660   3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term B Course Length: 8 weeks No RC required

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5670 - Foundations of Integrative and Functional Nutrition


    Students taking this course will expand upon their knowledge of basic nutrition science and gain a foundational understanding of the integrative and functional approach to nutrition.  The course reviews the fundamental principles and perspectives of conventional, traditional, integrative, and functional medical models to identify best practices for nutritional care.  Students learn about the concepts and tools used within the these practices and how they align with the integrative practitioner’s goal for personalized, whole-person, relationship-centered, and environmentally sensitive care. Prerequisite(s): IFN 5520  (or proof of previous nutrition coursework) 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term A, SP-Term A Course Length: 8 weeks No RC Required Relevant Learning Outcomes: TBA

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5672 - Nutritional Perspectives from Ayurvedic Medicine


    This course provides an overview of nutritional perspectives of Ayurvedic medicine. Students study Ayurvedic medicine conceptual paradigm, historical foundation, the typical physician patient relationship, commonly used interventions in current practice, and outcome studies assessing efficacy for common health disorders. Students further explore this traditional medicine system via a research paper using Ayurvedic dietary and herbal medicine interventions for the management of a specific condition or disorder.

      Prerequisite(s): None 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: SP-Term B Course Length: 8 weeks No RC Required


Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5673 - Integrative Approaches to the Digestive System


    Integrative and functional medicine proposes “starting with the gut” as digestive health is often the necessary first step in the healing process.  Nutritional interventions through food, eating, and mind/body skills are essential parts of the holistic healing process.  This course will focus on the structure and function of the digestive tract and the impact and influence of food and eating on health and disease.  Topics include: eating and digesting, optimal nutrient assimilation, intestinal barrier defense, the influence of gut microbiota on health, the gut-brain axis, adverse food reactions, autoimmune disorders, and other systemic illnesses and digestive diseases.  Prerequisite(s): IFN 5520 (or proof of previous nutrition coursework), IFN 5704  (or proof of previous Anatomy/Physiology coursework) 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term A, SP-Term A Course Length: 8 weeks No RC Required

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5676 - Dietary Supplements and Herbal Medicine


    This course examines one of the most common modalities of integrative medicine: dietary and herbal supplements.  The course provides an overview of the regulations that govern manufacturing, sales, and marketing of dietary supplements. Students will use reliable and peer-reviewed resources to critically evaluate the proposed benefits, efficacy, and safety of supplements in order to inform client recommendations.   3.0 credits.

      Prerequisite(s): IFN 5520  (or proof of previous nutrition coursework) 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA-Term B Course Length: 8 weeks No RC required


Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5677 - Integrative and Functional Nutrition: Therapeutics


    This course examines chronic disease pathophysiology, as it relates to integrative and functional nutrition therapy. The course prepares students to apply the nutritional care process towards restoring function and managing core clinical imbalances and symptoms. Students learn to evaluate and compose nutrition care plans using case-simulation examples. Prerequisite(s): IFN 5611 IFN 5670 ,  IFN 5673 IFN 5676 IFN 5678 , IFN 5688  , IFN 5689  , and IFN 5694   3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term B, SP-Term B Course Length: 8 weeks No RC required

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5678 - Advanced Nutritional Physiology


    This course furthers students’ understanding of nutritional science by studying the role of nutrients in health and disease at the levels of cells, tissues and organ systems.  Students study nutrient needs of various tissues and organs, compare nutrient trafficking in the absorptive and post-absorptive phases, learn how nutrient metabolism differs in times of excess or shortage, and explore how the body adapts to metabolic demands, including stress, to maintain critical functions. The sciences of nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics, and epigenetics are discussed, along with the concept of genetic imprinting and the role of antenatal nutrition on disease susceptibility of offspring. Prerequisite(s): IFN 5520  (or documentation of 3 credits of college-level nutrition coursework), IFN 5703  (or documentation of 3 credits of college-level biochemistry or organic chemistry), IFN 5704  (or documentation of 3 credits of college-level Anatomy/Physiology). 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term A, SP-Term A Course Length: 8 weeks No RC required

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5679 - Practicum in Integrative and Functional Nutrition


    This course is structured to allow students to explore real-world situations related to future practice in integrative and functional nutrition. The appropriate student-identified clinical site allows students to engage practicum clients in integrative and functional nutrition therapy, dietary and nutritional counseling, and health education approaches and techniques for individuals or groups. The practicum can also be arranged to pursue community nutrition, research, food systems, industry and policy practice areas. Possible practice settings include: hospitals, clinics, schools, nursing homes, community centers, wellness and fitness centers, homeless shelters, prisons, food systems, farm programs, and industry and corporate work places. A total of 100 supervised practice hours are required, however, students can choose how they would like to complete these hours over the course of the 8-week term. Prerequisite(s): IFN 5611  , IFN 5670 , IFN 5673 , IFN 5676 , IFN 5678 , IFN 5688 , IFN 5689 , IFN 5694 . 1.0 credit(s)
    Offered: Anyterm Course Length: 8 weeks No RC required.

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5680 - Capstone Seminar in Integrative and Functional Nutrition


    This course provides students the opportunity to reflect on their graduate education and envision their post-graduate professions.  Throughout the term, students look back and review their coursework to prepare for the culminating exam of their Master’s of Science in IFN program.  Students also look ahead and describe their professional goals, outline the skills and attributes required for success, and perform a self-inventory to identify personal strengths and areas for further development.  Through various self-assessments and activities, students will begin to assemble a roadmap for continuing education and career development to help them achieve their professional goals and become lifelong learners and scholar-practitioners. IFN 5679   3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term A/B and SP-Term A/B Course Length: 16 weeks No RC required.

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5688 - Advanced Nutritional Biochemistry–Macronutrients


    Understanding root cause of disease requires an understanding of cellular metabolism and the network of pathways that connect systems. This course takes an applied approach to studying how biochemical reactions of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins within the cell affect whole body health.  Homeostatic mechanisms regulating macronutrient metabolism and the cellular and systemic responses to nutritional imbalances are studied in the context of several common diseases. Methods to assess macronutrient requirements and status are incorporated throughout the course. Prerequisite(s): IFN 5520  (or documentation of 3 credits of college-level nutrition coursework), IFN 5703  (or documentation of 3 credits of college-level biochemistry or organic chemistry, IFN 5704  (or documentation of 3 credtis of college-level Anatomy/Physiology). 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term B, SP-Term B Course Length: 8 weeks No RC required.

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5689 - Advanced Nutritional Biochemistry–Micronutrients


    This course studies the molecular, cellular and metabolic functions of vitamins and minerals and how they affect health.  Clinical methods of assessing micronutrient status and the effects of deficiency or toxicity will be studied, as will the influence of genetic variability on micronutrient requirements and functions.  Prerequisite(s): IFN 5520  (or documentation of 3 credits of college-level nutrition coursework), IFN 5703  (or documentation of 3 credits of college-level biochemistry or organic chemistry), IFN 5704  (or documentation of 3 credits of college-level Anatomy/Physiology). 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: SP-Term A Course Length: 8 weeks No RC required.

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5694 - Nutrition-Focused Physical Exam


    This course prepares students for subjective nutrition assessment, including identifying systems, signs, and symptoms that are associated with subclinical or latent disease states, and nutrition-focused physical exam indicators of macronutrient and micronutrient adequacy, insufficiency, deficiency, and excess/toxicity. Prerequisite(s): IFN 5520  (or documentation of 3 credits of college-level nutrition coursework, IFN 5703  (or documentation of 3 credits of college-level biochemistry or organic chemistry), IFN 5704  (or documentation of 3 credits of college-level Anatomy/Physiology). 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: SU Course Length: 8 weeks No RC required.

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5703 - General Biochemistry


    This course provides a comprehensive overview of biochemistry, including structure, molecular function, and the regulation of cellular metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, and other biologically important compounds, with integration into overall anabolic and catabolic metabolic processes. IFN 5703 General Biochemistry satisfies the General Biochemistry basic sciences requirement for the master’s degree program in Integrative and Functional Nutrition, and the course prerequisite for IFN 5688 and IFN 5689 Advanced Nutritional Biochemistry Macronutrients and Micronutrients, respectively. Prerequisite(s): None. 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term B, SP-Term B Course Length: 8 weeks No RC required.

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5704 - Anatomy and Physiology


    This course provides a comprehensive overview of the anatomy and physiology of the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, digestive, endocrine, nervous, respiratory, immune, urinary, reproductive, and integumentary systems, and their interrelationships. IFN 5704 Anatomy and Physiology satisfies the Anatomy and Physiology basic sciences requirement for the master’s degree program in Integrative and Functional Nutrition, and the course prerequisite for IFN 5678 Advanced Nutritional Physiology. Prerequisite(s): None 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term A and SU-Term A Course Length: 8 weeks No RC required

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5705 - Psychobiology of Eating


    What to eat? When to eat? What not to eat?… The act of eating is a result of a complex interaction of biological, psychological, and social systems. For some, daily decisions about food and eating are easily made.  For others, they become an arduous and challenge-filled activity. This course bridges the gap between the human physiology of nutrition and the psychology that influences our food preferences, food/mood connections, and the pathways towards disordered eating patterns. Students will develop a foundational understanding of the behavior of eating and mechanisms that help people make choices that are essential to health and well-being.  It explores the continuum of eating behavior, from healthy eating practices to problematic and disordered habits, as well as identifies contributors of unhealthy eating practices and uncovers potential interventions to restore health and balance from an integrative perspective. Prerequisite(s): None. 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: SP-Term B Course Length: 8 weeks No RC required.

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 8100 - Independent Study


    This course facilitates an individualized course of study for a student, outside the standard curriculum. The independent study course enables a student to pursue an individualized topic with an instructor, based on a learning contract established in dialogue between the student and the instructor, and approved by the Program Director. The contract should specify course learning objectives, readings, and assignments.  The course credits assigned will depend on the quantity of work established in the learning contract. The student must complete approximately 45 hours of directed studies for each assigned credit hour. Prerequisite(s): None. 1.0 - 4.0 credit(s)
    Offered: Any Term Course Length: 8/16 weeks No RC required. Relevant Learning Outcomes: To be defined in learning contract.

Other Courses

  
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    MAM 8009 - Innovative Organizational Leadership: Qualities and Skills


    Organizational effectiveness is grounded in leaders who are adaptive, entrepreneurial, decisive, and ethical. Caring about co-workers at all levels of the organization, leaders empower members of the workforce to be innovative and to take ownership of their jobs so the organization can reach its target goals at the same time their job satisfaction increases. This course critically analyzes the core qualities and skills that contemporary leaders need, explores the characteristics of various leadership styles, and assesses their strengths and limitations. Particular attention is given to the vital roles of innovative vision, emotional intelligence and sustainable principles and values for in collaborative management, organization change efforts, and sustainable business operations. 3 credit(s)

Across all degree programs

  
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    ALL 0700 - Academic Writing


    Academic Writing is a one-credit tutorial that provides substantive support for students seeking to develop writing skills that allow them to meet APA- and graduate-level standards. Recognizing that students have diverse needs, the course has been structured to be flexible enough to accommodate each student’s experience and needs by offering three writing approaches: process, product, and personal voice. There are no prerequisites for Academic Writing 0700. Enrollment can be by student’s choice, required at admission, or recommended to the student by content course instructors at any time during the program. Students may take up to 3 credits of Academic Writing over the duration of their program at Saybrook. Enrollments beyond the 3-credit limit will be on a non-credit basis only. 1 credit(s)
  
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    ALL 0701 - Academic Writing


    Academic Writing is a one-credit tutorial that provides substantive support for students seeking to develop writing skills that allow them to meet APA- and graduate-level standards. Recognizing that students have diverse needs, the course has been structured to be flexible enough to accommodate each student’s experience and needs by offering three writing approaches: process, product, and personal voice. There are no prerequisites for ALL 0700 - Academic Writing . Enrollment can be by student’s choice, required at admission, or recommended to the student by content course instructors at any time during the program. Students may take up to 3 credits of Academic Writing over the duration of their program at Saybrook. Enrollments beyond the 3-credit limit will be on a non-credit basis only. 1 credit(s)
  
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    ALL 0702 - Academic Writing


    Academic Writing is a one-credit tutorial that provides substantive support for students seeking to develop writing skills that allow them to meet APA- and graduate-level standards. Recognizing that students have diverse needs, the course has been structured to be flexible enough to accommodate each student’s experience and needs by offering three writing approaches: process, product, and personal voice. There are no prerequisites for ALL 0700 - Academic Writing . Enrollment can be by student’s choice, required at admission, or recommended to the student by content course instructors at any time during the program. Students may take up to 3 credits of Academic Writing over the duration of their program at Saybrook. Enrollments beyond the 3-credit limit will be on a non-credit basis only. 1 credit(s)
  
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    ALL 0703 - Academic Writing


    Academic Writing is a one-credit tutorial that provides substantive support for students seeking to develop writing skills that allow them to meet APA- and graduate-level standards. Recognizing that students have diverse needs, the course has been structured to be flexible enough to accommodate each student’s experience and needs by offering three writing approaches: process, product, and personal voice. There are no prerequisites for ALL 0700 - Academic Writing . Enrollment can be by student’s choice, required at admission, or recommended to the student by content course instructors at any time during the program. Students may take up to 3 credits of Academic Writing over the duration of their program at Saybrook. Enrollments beyond the 3-credit limit will be on a non-credit basis only. 0 credit(s)
  
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    ALL 0704 - Academic Writing


    Academic Writing is a one-credit tutorial that provides substantive support for students seeking to develop writing skills that allow them to meet APA- and graduate-level standards. Recognizing that students have diverse needs, the course has been structured to be flexible enough to accommodate each student’s experience and needs by offering three writing approaches: process, product, and personal voice. There are no prerequisites for ALL 0700 - Academic Writing . Enrollment can be by student’s choice, required at admission, or recommended to the student by content course instructors at any time during the program. Students may take up to 3 credits of Academic Writing over the duration of their program at Saybrook. Enrollments beyond the 3-credit limit will be on a non-credit basis only. 0 credit(s)
  
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    ALL 0705 - Academic Writing


    Academic Writing is a one-credit tutorial that provides substantive support for students seeking to develop writing skills that allow them to meet APA- and graduate-level standards. Recognizing that students have diverse needs, the course has been structured to be flexible enough to accommodate each student’s experience and needs by offering three writing approaches: process, product, and personal voice. There are no prerequisites for ALL 0700 - Academic Writing . Enrollment can be by student’s choice, required at admission, or recommended to the student by content course instructors at any time during the program. Students may take up to 3 credits of Academic Writing over the duration of their program at Saybrook. Enrollments beyond the 3-credit limit will be on a non-credit basis only. 0 credit(s)
  
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    ALL 8100 - Independent Study


    At Saybrook University, we welcome the opportunity for students to engage in an in-depth exploration of topics that might not be offered within an already-approved course format within one of the degree programs. Students come to Saybrook with myriad interests, and the exploration of new and emerging topics is an exciting and stimulating endeavor. This student-driven course affords the student an opportunity to engage any Saybrook faculty regarding the topic of interest and the course can be offered for 1 - 3 credits; this is to be determined by the student in consultation with the instructor. Independent Study must be approved by student’s department chair before course can be registered. Master’s degree students may take a maximum of 6 credits of Independent Study during the master’s program. Doctoral students may take a maximum of 9 credits of Independent Study during the doctoral program. 1-3 credit(s)
  
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    IS 600B - Global Leadership, Networking, and Cultural Intelligence


    Organizations of all types operate as dynamic distributed networks in a global arena. As business professionals managers are challenged to strategically engage a highly talented and culturally diverse workforce. They are to unleash their creativity so they can grapple with complex situations, establish knowledge sharing networks utilizing technology, collaboratively devise innovative solutions, make decisive decisions, and take action to enable the organization reach its goals. As ethical professionals, global leaders and managers are called to be civic global citizens who aid organizations be active responsible global community members. Through interactive face-to-face and virtual learning activities with European professionals this course provides opportunities for students to network with US and European professionals and to develop skills in:  critically devising global business operations in light of their historical, economic, political, and social contexts; managing distributed teams using technology to create dynamic virtual workplaces where people meet and engage with each other; establishing collaborative workplace environments that draw upon the strengths of diverse cultural worldviews, their approaches to leadership, work relationships, problem-solving, and professional ethics, and their lifestyles and sense of recreation; and envision equitable economic and sustainable business models and practices. This course includes an in-country immersion experience. 3 credit(s)

Counseling

  
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    COUN 2010 - Structure & Dynamics of the Family


    This course provides theoretical and phenomenological overview of the changing nature of family structures and dynamics through lifespan and intergenerational perspectives. The course explores the dynamics of human systems, processes in adaptation, and integrative approaches in systems interventions. The course emphasizes case description, historical and developmental perspectives, theoretical models in systems formulations, and integration of cultural and social structures in contextual dynamics. 3 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2025 - Counseling Theories


    This course explores four broad categories into which the types of therapy fall: a) psychodynamic; b) behavioral and cognitive-behavioral; c) existential, humanistic, and transpersonal; and d) family systems approaches. The course surveys the history and development of each school and its views on human nature, psychological health, normal development, psychopathology, and approaches to intervention. 3 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2031 - Assessment & Testing


    This course emphasizes humanistic perspectives in administration, interpretation, and reporting of assessment measurements using standardized empirical and phenomenological approaches. The course emphasizes clinical issues in reliability and validity, standardization and instrumentation, cultural and population specificity, and individual and contextual applications. The course provides an overview of ethics, testing objectives, and clinical implications in assessment settings. The course provides an overview of historical perspectives and theoretical models in assessment formulation. 3 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2040 - Advanced Research Methods


    This course will function as a supplement to other research courses within the program. During the course, students will have an opportunity to explore a variety of research methods, and to connect those methods to clinical practice, social justice, and advocacy work; within a clinical mental health setting. Potential methods of exploration may include, but are not limited to, action research, single subject case study, and others. 1 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2050 - Psychopathology and Diagnosis


    This course provides a critical overview of major schools of thought that have shaped modern thinking about various aspects of psychopathology (e.g. behavioral, biophysical, intrapsychic, phenomenological, and social) with attention to current diagnostic criteria of the DSM in relation to societal determinants of functional and dysfunctional behavior. Consideration is given to etiology, development, pathological patterns, psychotherapy, and critical evaluations of the field. Dysfunctional behavior is studied in the larger context of adaptation, self-actualization, and the development of human capacities. 3 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2060 - Human Sexuality


    Human Sexuality presents an investigation of sexuality within the larger context of the human experience. Emphasis is placed on the study of human sexual development, dimensions of sexual behavior, sex education, health issues, sex therapy, and cultural, ethical, spiritual and legal aspects of sexuality. The course emphasizes applications in clinical work with individuals and couples. 3 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2400A - Pre-Practicum Pro-Seminar


    This course introduces and follows the student through pre-degree Practicum search and preparatory coursework. The course addresses issues in practicum placement with emphasis in professional development. Emphasis is placed on the individual student’s clarification of licensing requirements and formulation of degree course plan. This course emphasizes acculturation of the student into the clinical mental health profession. Students enroll in this course in multiple semesters: A, B, C, D. The course is required each semester the student is enrolled in pre- practicum courses. 15 Contact Hours. 15 Contact Hours; 0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2400B - Pre-Practicum Pro-Seminar


    This course introduces and follows the student through pre-degree Practicum search and preparatory coursework. The course addresses issues in practicum placement with emphasis in professional development. Emphasis is placed on the individual student’s clarification of licensing requirements and formulation of degree course plan. This course emphasizes acculturation of the student into the clinical mental health profession. Students enroll in this course in multiple semesters: A, B, C, D. The course is required each semester the student is enrolled in pre- practicum courses. 15 Contact Hours. 0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2400C - Pre-Practicum Pro-Seminar


    This course introduces and follows the student through pre-degree Practicum search and preparatory coursework. The course addresses issues in practicum placement with emphasis in professional development. Emphasis is placed on the individual student’s clarification of licensing requirements and formulation of degree course plan. This course emphasizes acculturation of the student into the clinical mental health profession. Students enroll in this course in multiple semesters: A, B, C, D. The course is required each semester the student is enrolled in pre- practicum courses. 15 Contact Hours. 0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2400D - Pre-Practicum Pro-Seminar


    This course introduces and follows the student through pre-degree Practicum search and preparatory coursework. The course addresses issues in practicum placement with emphasis in professional development. Emphasis is placed on the individual student’s clarification of licensing requirements and formulation of degree course plan. This course emphasizes acculturation of the student into the clinical mental health profession. Students enroll in this course in multiple semesters: A, B, C, D. The course is required each semester the student is enrolled in pre- practicum courses. 15 Contact Hours. 0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2401A - Practicum/Internship Pro-Seminar


    This course introduces and follows the student/trainee through pre-degree Practicum training. The course addresses issues in practicum and internship training with emphasis in professional development. This course emphasizes acculturation of the student into the clinical profession of clinical mental health counseling. The course also prepares the student for the capstone Project/Thesis and/or Comprehensive Examination. Students enroll in this course in multiple semesters: A, B, C, D. The course is required each semester the student/trainee is enrolled in Practicum or Internship courses. 15 Contact Hours. 15 Contact Hours; 0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2401B - Practicum/Internship Pro-Seminar


    This course introduces and follows the student/trainee through pre-degree Practicum training. The course addresses issues in practicum and internship training with emphasis in professional development. This course emphasizes acculturation of the student into the clinical profession of clinical mental health counseling. The course also prepares the student for the capstone Project/Thesis and/or Comprehensive Examination. Students enroll in this course in multiple semesters: A, B, C, D. The course is required each semester the student/trainee is enrolled in Practicum or Internship courses. 15 Contact Hours.

      0 credit(s)

  
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    COUN 2401C - Practicum/Internship Pro-Seminar


    This course introduces and follows the student/trainee through pre-degree Practicum training. The course addresses issues in practicum and internship training with emphasis in professional development. This course emphasizes acculturation of the student into the clinical profession of clinical mental health counseling. The course also prepares the student for the capstone Project/Thesis and/or Comprehensive Examination. Students enroll in this course in multiple semesters: A, B, C, D. The course is required each semester the student/trainee is enrolled in Practicum or Internship courses. 15 Contact Hours. 0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2401D - Practicum/Internship Pro-Seminar


    This course introduces and follows the student/trainee through pre-degree Practicum training. The course addresses issues in practicum and internship training with emphasis in professional development. This course emphasizes acculturation of the student into the clinical profession of clinical mental health counseling. The course also prepares the student for the capstone Project/Thesis and/or Comprehensive Examination. Students enroll in this course in multiple semesters: A, B, C, D. The course is required each semester the student/trainee is enrolled in Practicum or Internship courses. 15 Contact Hours. 0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2500 - Basic Counseling Skills


    This course develops foundational clinical skills for professional work with individuals, couples, families, and groups. The course integrates humanistic theories and techniques with emphasis on self-exploration toward cultivating professional development of the counselor and psychotherapist. The course introduces foundations in clinical theory including stages of therapy, diagnostic assessment, and therapeutic intervention. The course focuses therapeutic practices including skills in developing the therapeutic container and alliance, empathic listening and reflection, unconditional positive regard, recognition of boundaries and therapeutic frame, exploration of self, sensitivity to diversity and multicultural issues, and capacity to embody an authentic sense of self as a counselor and psychotherapist. 3 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2505 - Psychopharmacology


    Students develop foundational understanding in psychopharmacology important to client-oriented clinical practice in psychotherapy and counseling. Students develop skills in forming a collaborative team with the client and the prescribing health professional. The course surveys fundamental diagnoses that may be accompanied by psychotropic medications and methods to help clients monitor medication effectiveness. The course emphasizes psychoactive medications within a biopsychosocial understanding of the client. The course surveys the interface of psychoactive medications in the practice of psychotherapy and counseling. 3 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2510 - Relationship and Family Intervention


    This course addresses philosophies and models of therapeutic intervention with couples and families. There is also a section on working with children, emphasizing work with children that include a family perspective. This course builds theoretical understanding and therapeutic skills and enlarges foundations introduced in the pre-requisite courses “Basic Clinical Skills” and “Structures and Dynamics of the Family.” 3 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2531 - Group Counseling and Psychotherapy


    This course examines philosophies and models of group counseling and psychotherapy. The course has four fundamental goals. The first is a critical analysis of contemporary theories and models of group counseling and psychotherapy. The second is to be able to identify the theories and therapeutic group approaches that best fit the context and nature of the clinical requirements and are congruent with the personality and values of the student and clients. A third goal is developing sensitivity to the many ways in which one’s values and beliefs impact one’s choice of interventions. A fourth goal is to encourage reflection regarding how the insights of different approaches may be applied in a group context within a humanistic framework. 3 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2532 - Career Development and Counseling


    This course is designed for students to gain an overview of career development theories, procedures and techniques in career counseling and career assessment tools. Empirically-based theories and counseling interventions are reviewed and examined in the context of working with diverse populations across school and community agencies and clinical practice settings. 3 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2555 - Advanced Child and Adolescent Therapy


    This course is designed for study in greater depth of major theories of child and adolescent development and relevant lifespan issues arising in these formative years. The course emphasizes clinical skills and therapeutic interventions for working with children, adolescents and their families in clinical, school, and community settings. 3 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2560 - Multiculturalism and the Family


    This course explores psychological approaches in social constructs and emphasizes the following factors in individual and family development: language, acculturation, economics, race, class, gender, sexual orientation, sociopolitical factors, child-rearing practices, family structure, religious traditions, cultural values and attitudes. The course focuses clinical issues of cultural competence in the context of ethics, laws, and regulations that define cultural awareness in counseling and psychotherapy. 3 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2561 - Substance Abuse and Behavioral Addictions


    This course provides foundational knowledge for conceptualizing, assessing, and treating substance abuse and compulsive behavioral disorders. The course examines the neurobiology of drug use and compulsive behavior within the prevailing models of addiction. The course develops understanding of drug use and addictive behavior as a biopsychosocial phenomenon that impacts individuals and communities. The course investigates the interactive process of motivating individuals for change across models of compulsive behavior, and explores treatment approaches with individuals in addiction. The course addresses ethical issues that arise in working with individuals with addictions. 3 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2562 - Crisis and Trauma Intervention


    This course describes biological, emotional, and cognitive processes of traumatic stress and examines the nature of PTSD and other diagnoses associated with exposure to traumatic stressors. The course explores social, cultural, developmental, physiological, and psychological factors in relation to vulnerability, resiliency, and recovery. Cultural sensitivity and the importance of client advocacy and working with consumer groups in aiding recovery are emphasized. The course explores stages of assessment, intervention, and recovery in relation to early attachment, physiology, and resiliency. The course emphasizes interventions for crisis and trauma sequelae. 3 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2650 - Professional Orientation and Ethical Practice


    This course focuses understanding on ethical and legal issues involved in the conduct of working with individuals, groups, couples and families. The course emphasizes ethical and legal principles in clinical counseling, group counseling and couples and family therapy and research and evaluation. Students examine the codes of ethics of professional counseling and marriage and family therapy associations and state/provincial laws and regulations governing mental health professions. Students develop understanding of their own attitudes and perspectives on ethical dilemmas in clinical work and research. 3 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2701 - Experiential: Basic Counseling Skills


    This series of hands-on courses focuses on development of clinical skills. 15 Contact Hours; 0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2702 - Experiential: Structure & Dynamics of the Family


    This series of hands-on courses focuses on development of clinical skills. 15 Contact Hours; 0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2703 - Experiential: Crisis & Trauma Intervention


    This series of hands-on courses focuses on development of clinical skills. 15 Contact Hours; 0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2704 - Experiential: Relationship & Family Intervention


    This series of hands-on courses focuses on development of clinical skills. 15 Contact Hours; 0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2705 - Experiential: Group Counseling & Psychotherapy


    This series of hands-on courses focuses on development of clinical skills. 15 Contact Hours; 0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2706 - Experiential: Child & Adolescent Counseling


    This series of hands-on courses focuses on development of clinical skills. 15 Contact Hours; 0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2707 - Experiential: Counseling Theories


    This experiential provides hands on practice with viewing cases through multiple theoretical lenses, practice with applying theory-based interventions and initiates early reflections on students’ personal models of counseling. Co-requisite(s): COUN 2025  Counseling Theories 15 Contact Hours; 0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2708 - Experiential: Advanced Counseling Skills 2


    This series of hands-on courses focuses on development of clinical skills. 15 Contact Hours; 0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 2709 - Experiential: Overview of to Mental Health Counseling


    This course introduces students to the field of Mental Health Counseling. Topics covered include the basics of clinical work, case notes, consolation, and types of environments counselors often work in. Attention will also be paid to reviewing the ACA ethical code, the different organizations within the field. Students will also have an opportunity to explore the type of counseling they might want to do, how they seem themselves working in the field, and any roadblocks they may face. 15 contact hours 0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 6020 - Lifespan Development


    The processes and significant transition points for child, adolescent, and adult development are considered in this class. Classic and contemporary theories of development through lifespan, including some modern western perspectives, are contrasted by examining their principal concepts and uncovering their assumptions about what motivates and influences development. Topics such as mother-infant attachment, sex-role socialization, cognitive and moral development, reciprocal effects in parent-child interaction, higher stages of adult development, and the revolutionary impact of feminist theory and research on classic models of development are emphasized. 3 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 7500 - Graduate Colloquium


    This course serves as a resource and advising cohort and mentoring colloquium to provide support for students who are beginning their graduate program. The course is divided into Part A for first semester students and Part B for second semester students. 0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 8152 - Practicum


    This is the first of three required 3-unit courses that introduce the student to field placement training. Both the approved field placement and the practicum course enrollment are required. Practicum 1 is designed to provide students with a model for thinking about themselves as practitioners, their expectations and concerns, while also providing an arena in which to compare and contrast field placement experiences with other students. Practicum 1 focuses on professional development important for beginning therapists. Students share from their practicum experience, drawing on their practicum reflections, individual and group exercises, and regular on-line threaded discussions. Students develop case formulations to recognize issues in assessment, evaluation, and diagnosis, and review treatment models, interventions, and therapeutic outcomes. 3 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 8153 - Internship 1


    This is the second of three required 3-unit courses that continue the field placement training. Both the approved field placement and the internship course enrollment are required. Internship 1 is designed to provide students with a model for approaching crisis and critical issues in clinical work, while also providing an arena in which to compare and contrast field placement experiences with other students. Internship 1 focuses on professional development important in issues in cultural and spiritual diversity. Students share from their internship experience, drawing on their internship reflections, individual and group exercises, and regular on-line threaded discussions. Students develop case formulations to recognize issues in assessment, evaluation, and diagnosis, and review treatment models, interventions, and therapeutic outcomes. 3 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 8154 - Internship 2


    This is the third of three required 3-unit courses that continue the field placement training. Internship 2 is designed to refine clinical skills in treatment formulation, evaluation of outcomes, and professional standards in documentation in clinical work. The course provides an arena in which to compare and contrast field placement experiences with other students. Internship 2 focuses on professional development important in issues in cultural and spiritual diversity. Students share from their internship experience, drawing on their internship reflections, individual and group exercises, and regular on-line threaded discussions. Students develop case formulations to recognize issues in assessment, evaluation, and diagnosis, and review treatment models, interventions, and therapeutic outcomes. 3 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 8155 - Internship 3


    This course is required for those students continuing in internship placement sites needing to obtain additional supervised clinical hours. Both the approved field placement and internship course enrollment are required. Internship 3 is designed to refine clinical skills in treatment formulation, evaluation of outcomes, and professional standards in documentation in clinical work. The course provides an arena in which to compare and contrast field placement experiences with other students and receive individual and group supervision during the time the student is completing field-placement hours. This internship course is required for those trainees who continue field-placement supervision to accrue pre-degree internship hours. 3 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 8156 - Clinical Inter-Session


    This course is required for those students continuing in field placement sites during the Summer Inter- Session and between Fall and Spring semesters. Both the approved field placement and course enrollment are required. The Clinical Inter-Session is designed to refine clinical skills in treatment formulation, evaluation of outcomes, and professional standards in documentation in clinical work. The course provides an arena in which to compare and contrast field placement experiences with other students and receive individual and group supervision during the time the student is completing field-placement hours. This course is required for those trainees who continue field-placement supervision to accrue pre-degree practicum hours. 0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 9100 - Comprehensive Exam


    The Counseling Comprehensive Exam requires an individual tutorial with the examining faculty as a capstone for the MA in Counseling. The examination process requires demonstrated understanding of clinical foundations, therapeutic skills, and applications in clinical evaluation and crisis management; treatment plan and treatment interventions; ethics, law, and professional standards; systemic and integrative therapeutic models; and therapeutic alliance. 0 credit(s)
  
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    COUN 9200 - MFT Master’s Project


    The MFT Project is designed for students who wish a capstone specialty study in a chosen topic under the mentorship of a faculty chair. The project is designed as a review of literature and examination of applications and evidence-based practice in a chosen area of inquiry. Students who wish to conduct a research study requiring participant interviews must register for RES 9200 - Master’s Project Research  or  RES 9400 - Master’s Thesis Research . 3 credit(s)

Creativity Studies

  
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    CS xxxx - In Development: “Creativity Coaching”


    Creativity Coaching provides students with an introduction to the coaching field and explores the application of coaching for creative expression and living a more creative life. This course will provide students with an academic foundation in the basic principles of sustained change and exposure to research on the effectiveness and uses of coaching in the fields of life coaching and enhancing creativity. This course provides students with the knowledge and practical skills to work effectively with people to support and empower them in optimizing their everyday creativity through increased awareness of physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being. Students will strengthen their ability to “self-coach” and facilitate their own creativity. Each student will develop a personal creative living plan and have opportunities for peer coaching. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CS xxxx - In Development: “Movies and Mental Illness”


    Creativity can be expressed in multiple ways and through many different media. One medium of particular interest to students is film. For graduate students in psychology, films provide a provocative and engaging vehicle for understanding mental illness because there are excellent and accurate portrayals of psychopathology, but there are also some egregiously bad presentations of mental illness in movies. This class, Movies and Mental Illness, will examine each major category of mental illness included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association). The major features of each disorder will be reviewed as well as controversies in the field, and full length films and numerous film vignettes will be used to illustrate the various psychopathologies discussed. The instructor will teach out of his own book, Movies and Mental Illness (http://www.hogrefe.com/program/movies-and-mental-illness-2.html) and students will be expected to watch two full length films each week and read two supplemental texts as well as selected professional articles relevant to psychopathology and its representation in film. In addition, students will be expected to read and discuss the weekly film reviews that appear in PsycCRITIQUES (http://psyccritiquesblog.apa.org/films/), APA’s journal of book and film reviews. Any shortcomings or inaccuracies in film portrayals of specific diagnoses will be carefully discussed, so that students in current or future clinical practice will not mistake movie portrayals (however compelling they may be) for genuine conditions. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CS 3010 - Arts-Based Inquiry


    When a form of inquiry is conceptualized and actualized in terms of creative processes in pursuit of human knowing, using as its primary means an art medium, it may be termed art- based inquiry. This course examines select forms of thinking about, and doing, art-based inquiry, inclusive of its relevance to research processes and forms of scientific inquiry. Although preference is given to the visual arts, other art forms may be pursued. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CS 3530 - Death and Loss in Literature and Film


    This course will survey a number of writers and filmmakers and their respective artworks contending with questions of meaning and the poignancy to be found in life at the limits and the irrepressible passage of time. Art, we may say, is an especially rarified response to the dilemma of time and the inexorable loss that attends it. The poet Rilke put it this way:

    Once everything, only once. Once and no more. And we, too, once. Never again. But having been this once, even though only once: having been on earth does not seem revocable.

    It is precisely this sense of impermanence, of evanescence, of life’s ultimate mystery and the potential beauty therein that will serve as our curricular touchstone. “It is not possible,” mused the ancient philosopher Heraclitus, “to step twice into the same river.” Aeschylus, younger contemporary to Heraclitus, saw suffering as inevitable, with wisdom the hard-won purchase of pain falling “drop by drop upon the heart”-words quoted, movingly, by Robert F. Kennedy in an extemporaneous eulogy on the night of Martin Luther King’s assassination. This course will inquire into these bedrock existential/humanistic/transpersonal themes-life at the limits and the place of aesthetics and creative response, with literature and film, especially, offering protection and remedy. 3 credit(s)

  
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    CS 4500 - Dimensions of Creativity


    The many dimensions of scientific and artistic creativity are studied, as well as the way creativity relates to social-cultural influences, gender, family background, personality factors, and cognitive styles. This course examines the creative process, the creative person, the creative product, and the creative environment. Imagery and symbolization, intrapsychic experience, and aesthetic issues are explored. Recent creativity research and theories of creative development are considered. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CS 4510 - Perspectives in Creativity


    This course is designed to deepen their understanding of creativity and utilize newly learned insights to enhance their creative process as well as stimulate the creative process of others. Students develop an awareness of factors that stimulate or inhibit their own creative process and apply what they learn in an area of vital importance to them. Tapping into creativity is increasingly important for both individuals and society. The challenge of living in a world that is complex and changes at an increasing speed challenges all of us to develop our unique abilities. Creativity is defined here as “the production of relevant and effective novelty” (Cropley, 1999). What is effective varies in different fields and circumstances. There is a deep important need for new and effective answers in many different areas of our culture, our work, and everyday life. Our survival as a species will require answers to new and challenging problems involving both individual and international relationships, ecology, education, health, the arts, population growth, and the economy. This course is designed to deepen their understanding of creativity and utilize newly learned insights to enhance their creative process as well as stimulate the creative process of others. Students will develop awareness of factors that stimulate or inhibit their own creative process and apply what students learn in an area of vital importance to students. Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of CS 4500 . 3 credit(s)
  
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    CS 4520 - Art and Healing


    ing aspects of art across cultures and throughout history, allows students to choose the type of art they would like focus (e.g., visual art, writing, music, humor, dance, drama, poetry, film, and the creative arts therapies). It will expand students’ capacities to perceive, benefit from, and transmit the healing aspects of art by bringing its dynamics more fully into conscious awareness. Through examining the universality of archetypes, the empowering experiences of diverse artists using creativity as a form of resilience, and the effectiveness of a variety of arts as multicultural healing modalities, students will come to understand more fully how art is integral to the human quest for wholeness. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CS 4525 - Poetry and Holistic Health


    Examination of the conceptual bases for the healing potential in poetry, with study of poetry written by health practitioners, by patients, their friends, and families. Students will become familiar with poetry on such themes as cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, alcoholism, and bereavement. They will be supported in the development and refinement of original poetry on illness and wellness themes of particular interest. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CS 4526 - Creativity and Writing


    This course provides an overview of the research relevant to the field of Creativity Studies and writing. Areas covered will include psychological research regarding writers and writing, the use of writing as an aid in healing trauma, understanding of the creative process in writing and aspects of the publishing process. Students will write original work based on their personal interests and goals. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CS 4535 - The Use of Poetry with Death, Loss, and Life Transition


    The creative arts are often used to assist people facing death, loss, and other important life transitions. Similarly, these life events often cause individuals to reflect upon the meaning in their life and seek to create new meaning, which can be aided by poetry and the creative arts. This course focuses on the use of poetry when encountering death, loss, and life transitions. Students are encouraged to reflect upon their own use of creativity in times of difficult life transitions. Additionally, students will explore ways to facilitate the use of poetry with others facing life transitions. Poems from various cultural backgrounds are considered.  Though open to all students, this course also satisfies the Clinical Interventions III/IV requirement in the Clinical Psychology degree program, with Clinical Interventions I & II as prerequisites. Cross-listed with EHTP 4535 and PSY 4535. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CS 4540 - Creativity and Social Change


    To address the many threats and challenges facing humanity, good intentions and familiar techniques will not be enough. New (or newly adapted) solutions are needed. Saybrook’s existing fields of Creativity and Transformative Social Change make perfect partners for blending social conscience with innovative thinking. Fascinating and ingenious inventions are already solving some of the world’s most pressing problems. Students will study readings from the fields of creativity and social change, explore an amazing assortment of newly devised solutions as well as some traditional ones that deserve a second look, make active experiments, and practice developing one viable solution of their choosing. In this course, Creativity students can practice operationalizing their ideas and Transformative Social Change students can develop their innovative sides. The course could also be of benefit to clinicians aware of the external pressures their clients face; activists tackling issues of ethnicity, sexual orientation, and gender; and mediators looking to solve entrenched hostilities. Combining the expected scholarly readings with practical assignments, the course can serve as an incubator for students’ ideas for making the world a better place. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CS 6606 - Introduction to Expressive Arts


    This course provides an introduction to Expressive Arts approaches, paradigms, and theoretical concepts that aid in developing multi-modal fluency for the purposes of self-discovery. The expressive arts therapist, consultant, or educator combines and integrates visual arts, movement, drama, music, writing, and other creative processes to foster growth and transformation with individuals and groups. Person-Centered Expressive Arts and The Creative Connection® developed by Natalie Rogers will be explored through personal process, discussion, and readings. The course includes a peer coaching process using expressive arts and requires attendance at a 2-day experiential expressive arts workshop offered at the Saybrook RC.   3 credit(s)
  
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    CS 7067 - Organizational Creativity


    This course gives students an understanding of both the theoretical and practical applications of organizational creativity. Organizational executives and consultants, psychologists, educators, and others who work in organizations will learn research-based information about constructing an environment that encourages creativity and innovation. Topics covered will include comprehension of creativity from a systems perspective, group creativity, creative leadership, and factors that can encourage or discourage organizational creativity. This course meets Saybrook’s mission and goals in that it provides students with a knowledge base that informs their work as leaders of organizational change and professionals who work within a global context. This course is structured into four modules, each building on the last to enlarge students’ understanding of organizational creativity. The first module will ground students’ understanding of creativity research historically so that they can understand the basics regarding individual and organizational creativity including the climates and cultures that influence creativity at work. The second module looks at key factors in group creativity with an emphasis on aspects of idea generation and context. The third module examines a variety of important aspects related to the social psychology of creativity including networking, leadership, entrepreneurship, and diversity. The final module is designed to integrate what students have learned into application. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CS 8151 - Practicum in Professional Practice


    This course is intended for students seeking practicum training not related to clinical practicum or the MFT program. Students are responsible for arranging the practicum and should consult the director of the Creativity Studies Specialization in order to identify a Saybrook faculty liaison. Prerequisite(s): Open only to students pursuing a Creativity Studies certificate. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CS 8950 - Certificate Integrative Seminar


    The final part of the Certificate program is the integrative paper. The purpose of the integrative paper is to give the learner an opportunity to draw together the most important aspects of the Certificate courses, to assess strengths and identify further learning needs, and to develop a specific plan for continuing personal and professional work. Prerequisite(s): Open only to students pursuing a Creativity Studies certificate. 1 credit(s)

Consciousness, Spirituality, and Integrative Health

  
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    CSIH 3000 - Psychology of Consciousness


    This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts, paradigms, and current issues in studies of consciousness. It explores the field from diverse approaches including humanistic and transpersonal psychology, cognitive and affective neuroscience, cross-cultural studies, existential-phenomenological methodologies, and other related disciplines. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 3040 - Models of Consciousness


    This course explores the process of model building in psychology and human science by examining a spectrum of current models that dominate the study of consciousness, including those from cognitive neuroscience, the classical depth psychologies of Freudian psychoanalysis, humanistic and transpersonal approaches, Jungian psychology, and a selection of conceptions from the classical psychologies of Asia. How to identify the logic, metaphysics, epistemology, ontology, and cosmology of a given model will be a primary focus. What relevance these models of consciousness have for humanistic and transpersonal psychology and human science will also be of concern. Because individuals often attempt a phenomenological integration of everything, based on some fusion of their readings of theoretical writings on the subject with scientific research, personal proclivities, and intuitive norms from clinical experience, attempts at the students’ own synthesis of a more adequate model of consciousness will be encouraged. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 3070 - Eastern Psychologies


    This course first asks students to consider how the orientations of Eastern psychologies illuminate and are coming into relationship with Western psychology. Looking at major developments in (among others) Buddhist, Hindu/Yogic, and Taoist thought and history, students will gain a broad, working knowledge of the meaning and substance of major Eastern psychology principles as well as their potential therapeutic values. With this working knowledge in hand, the course has students consider the promise and limitations of contemporary Western applications, adaptations, and research assessments of Eastern psychologies. Finally, students are invited to participate in an experiential project from which they will gain first-hand embodied and intuitive knowledge, insight that cannot be obtained simply through studying the literature. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 3080 - Psychology of Shamanism


    During most of the 20th century, the study of shamanism was virtually ignored by psychologists as a topic of investigation despite the fact that shamans were the world’s first “psychologists.” In recent years, however, a variety of perceptive books and articles on the psychology of shamanism has begun to find its way into the academic curriculum. Humanistic and transpersonal psychologists have taken an interest in the study of shamanism for several reasons. They do not subscribe to the notion that psychology has little to learn from “primitive” people (who are more appropriately referred to as “native,” “traditional,” or “indigenous” people). On the contrary, humanistic and transpersonal psychologists find sophistication in the shaman’s cultivation and use of certain procedures for altering conscious experience that go beyond what is currently available in more industrialized societies. In addition, the shaman’s use of language and art is extremely instructive with regard to the efficacy of metaphors and symbols in social interactions. Moreover, humanistic and transpersonal psychology’s interface with holistic health practitioners has benefited from a study of shamanic healing. The question of mental health and social context is at the heart of the controversy between humanistic and transpersonal psychologists on the one hand and, on the other hand, the many psychoanalytically-oriented writers, regarding whether the behavior of shamans should be considered symptomatic of psychosis or neurosis. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 3150 - Neuropsychology of Dreams and Dreaming


    Welcome to one of the most fascinating areas of investigation in consciousness studies; few if any other areas bring together in one place as many aspects of neuropsychology. In this course students will learn more than brain physiology and theories of how brain function is connected to nighttime dreaming; they will also obtain a bird’s eye view of the mind and the brain working together, as beautifully exemplified in the exquisitely complex yet simple action of the sleeping brain. This course focuses on the neuropsychological aspects of dreaming. In doing so, it explores differences between activity in the waking and sleeping brain, examines the major views on how dreams are generated in the sleeping brain, and opens for discussion the implications of this knowledge for a richer understanding of the nature of waking and dreaming consciousness. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 3160 - Personal Mythology and Dreamwork


    In this course, students will learn what is meant by the term “personal mythology.” They will be introduced to the idea that every person develops a particular personal mythology that guides and influences his or her perceptions, thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. They will be introduced to the primary factors that seem to be responsible for the development of particular personal mythologies (e.g., a person’s genetic inheritance, family of origin, kinship group, and social milieu). The course can be taken with an experiential emphasis, an academic emphasis, or a mixture of these. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 3165 - Understanding and Appreciating Dreams


    This course offers valuable tools for individuals and groups. Engaging in dreamwork can offer personal insight and spiritual growth. The “grassroots dream movement” has initiated non- clinical uses of dream reports for purposes of creative expression, spiritual development, and group exploration. This course covers the use of recalled dreams in both clinical and non-clinical settings. It spans a variety of ideological perspectives, emphasizing those that can be quickly learned and adroitly applied with minimal risk and maximum benefit to the dreamer. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CSIH 3200 - Seminar in Consciousness, Spirituality, and Integrative Health


    This course provides an introduction to the primary themes in consciousness, spirituality, and integrative health. Students will be introduced to foundational definitions, concepts, and theories. This course will also serve to orient students to the Consciousness, Spirituality, and Integrative Health Specialization, including curriculum paths, vocational possibilities, and relevant professional organizations and conferences. It is recommended that students in the Consciousness, Spirituality, and Integrative Health Specialization begin with this course. It provides foundational knowledge that will be built upon in future coursework. Additionally, this course introduces various career paths in order to help students identify, at the outset, the courses that will be most relevant to meeting their future vocational aspirations. Students will also become familiar with various resources that will be useful in their future coursework. 3 credit(s)
 

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