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2019-2020 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook
Saybrook University
   
 
  Dec 13, 2019
 
2019-2020 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook 
    
2019-2020 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook

Course Descriptions


Courses are identified and organized by degree program. Listed below are those courses for the 2019-2020 academic school year. CampusVue will list courses open for enrollment each semester, by Section if applicable. Not all courses are offered every semester. 

College of Integrative Medicine and Health Sciences (CIMHS)

All courses are online.  Each course description includes information about the term in which it is offered every academic year, as well as any prerequisites and residential conference (RC) requirements.  Students registered for an online course that requires residential training must attend the specific RC component to remain enrolled. 

 

 

Other Courses

  
  •  

    COA 5593 - Advanced Coaching Practicum


    In this final skills and competencies development course in the coaching curriculum, students will engage in twelve experiential coaching sessions with 2-4 practice clients. This advanced coaching practicum provides students with the opportunity to utilize and improve their spectrum of integrative wellness coaching skills within their specific coaching niche. Students will receive weekly faculty supervision and peer coaching support via videoconference, mentoring, and online discussions. This is the third of three required courses in the Integrative Wellness Coaching Certificate program. 3.0 credits.

      Prerequisite(s): COA 5628  and COA 5632   3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term A/B (Offering depends upon enrollment numbers) Course Length: 15 weeks No RC required


Other Courses

  
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    COA 5628 - Evidence-Based Coaching


    This course presents a comprehensive overview of the foundational coaching competencies and skills as defined by the International Coach Federation (ICF), International Consortium for Health and Wellness Coaching (ICHWC), and Center for Credentialing and Education (Board Certified Coach).  Throughout the duration of the course, students will (a) learn about the similarities and differences between coaching, counseling, and consulting; (b) apply the coaching framework and skills to facilitate effective coaching conversations and processes; (c) review the theories and evidence-based approaches that support the coaching process and its outcomes; and (d) discuss career opportunities within the coaching profession.  This is the first of three required courses in the Integrative Wellness Coaching Certificate program.  3 credit(s)
    Offered: SP - Term A and FA - Term A Course Length: 7 weeks RC required

Other Courses

  
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    COA 5632 - Intermediate Coaching


    This intermediate level coaching course is designed to strengthen the core coaching competencies taught in the foundational COA 5628 Evidence-Based Coaching course.  Throughout the 7-week term, students will (a) discuss and practice intermediate coaching skills and competencies , (b) identify and use various health and wellness assessments related to coaching, (c) identify opportunities and approaches to integrate mind-body-spirit techniques within coaching sessions, (d) strengthen self-coaching skills and self-care practices, and (e) investigate coaching opportunities within the integrative healthcare field (e.g., medical, community health and wellness, private practice, corporate wellness). This is the second of three required courses in the Integrative Wellness Coaching Certificate program. Prerequisite(s): COA 5628   3 credit(s)
    Offered: SU - Term A Course Length: 7 weeks No RC required

Other Courses

  
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    COA 5633 - MA Capstone Seminar in Integrative Wellness Coaching


    In this culminating course, students will synthesize their knowledge of coaching theories and integrative wellness practices in a final capstone essay. Students will also develop and present a strategic plan that describes the evidence-based coaching approach or program that they intend to implement within their respective profession. This pragmatic orientation to business and career planning will prepare individuals to answer important questions related to their future career in the integrative health field. Prerequisite(s): All required CIMHS courses in the MA in Integrative Wellness Coaching degree.  Any exceptions must be approved by the Program Director. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Any Term Course Length: 15 Weeks No RC Required

Other Courses

  
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    COA 5700 - Foundations of Lifestyle Medicine


    This course presents a comprehensive overview of lifestyle medicine and optimizing pathways toward greater wellbeing.  As a foundations course, students will be introduced to holistic approaches to assess various dimensions of personal wellness.  Each week, students will explore a new dimension of wellness by reviewing and critiquing literature and assessment in positive health, lifestyle medicine, health promotion, and cultural humility and sensitivity.  This class is fundamental for students preparing for a career in wellness coaching and consulting.

      3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA - Term A, SP - Term A and SU - Term A Course Length: 7 Weeks (Summer 8 weeks) No RC Required


Other Courses

  
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    COA 5707 - Positive Psychology Applications in Coaching


    Students will learn about and apply the primary coaching theories within positive psychology to enhance their work with individuals and organizations focusing on human strengths and values, eudemonic wellbeing, and quality of life. This course emphasizes the psychosocial underpinnings related to human flourishing as well as empirically validated assessments and interventions to use with coaching clients in various settings. Finally, students will be presented with coaching tools for empowering individuals towards optimal wellbeing, engagement, and productivity.
      3 credit(s)
    Offered: SP - Term B Course Length: 7 Weeks No RC required

Other Courses

  
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    COA 8100 - Independent Study


    The independent study course enables a student to pursue an individualized topic with an approved faculty instructor.  The subject must be relevant to the coaching profession and coaching applications; in addition, it must include subject matter not included in the curriculum.  Students are advised to contact the Registrar’s Office to ask for an Independent Study Request Form.  The instructor and student will negotiate specify course learning objectives, required and/or recommended readings, and assignments.  The course credits assigned will depend on the quantity of work established in the learning contract (e.g., 1-credit is equivalent to 45 hours of work).  When the form is complete, seek approval from the Program Director. NONE 1-4 credit(s)
    Offered: Any Term Course Length: 7 weeks No RC required Relevant Learning Outcomes: To be defined in the Independent Study Request Form

Other Courses

  
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    CS 3160 - Personal Mythology and Dreamwork


    In this course, students will learn what is meant by the term “personal mythology.” They will be introduced to the idea that every person develops a particular personal mythology that guides and influences his or her perceptions, thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. They will be introduced to the primary factors that seem to be responsible for the development of particular personal mythologies (e.g., a person’s genetic inheritance, family of origin, kinship group, and social milieu). The course can be taken with an experiential emphasis, an academic emphasis, or a mixture of these. Prerequisite(s): CS 4500 - Dimensions of Creativity   3 credit(s)

Other Courses

  
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    IFN XXXX - Field Experience in Nutrition


    Students electing to take this course will complete a minimum of 100 hours and up to 250 hours of supervised practice experience in nutrition setting of their choice.  The field experience will allow students the opportunity to observe and practice under an experienced professional.  Appropriate settings may include hospitals or health clinics; research facilities; schools, nursing homes or community centers; public health, industry, or government facilities; and food or agricultural settings.

      Prerequisite(s): IFN 5670 , IFN 5681 , IFN 5688 , IFN 5689   3 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall A/B, Spring A/B, Summer A Course Length: 15 weeks or 8 weeks in summer


Other Courses

  
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    IFN XXXX - MS IFN Capstone


    This course is the culmination of the Master of Science in Integrative & Functional Nutrition in which students will demonstrate competencies in the Program Learning Outcomes.  Students will complete a Capstone project that reflects their ability to synthesize and present evidence to guide practice.  Students will also take a final exam which they must pass in order to show proficient knowledge in Integrative and Functional Nutrition and to graduate from the program. Note: this course if for MS IFN students matriculating in Fall 2019 and beyond. Prerequisite(s): Take during final semester. 2 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall A/B; Spring A/B Course Length: 15 No RC required

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5514 - Virtual Community in Nutrition


    This semester-long course introduces students to Saybrook University, the Integrative & Functional Nutrition Program, and each other.  Students will become acclimated to Saybrook’s on-line learning environment while developing best practices for student success as they learn about a variety of topics in nutrition, health, and wellness.  Through active exploration of contemporary integrative health issues, students will be challenged to question their preconceived theories, consider opposing perspectives, and theorize about topics from a more global and humanistic perspective. Prerequisite(s): None 1 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term A/B and SP-Term A/B Course Length: 15 weeks No RC required

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5520 - Nutritional Science


    This course covers the fundamentals of nutrition science, including the physiological processes of digestion, absorption, and metabolism of essential nutrients; the basic chemical structures, functions, requirements, and food sources of nutrients; and the causes and consequences of nutrient deficiencies and toxicities.  This course meets the IFN department’s Nutrition Science requirement for those who have not had at least three credits of a college or graduate-level nutrition science course prior to admission. Prerequisite(s): None 3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term A and SP-Term A Course Length: 7 weeks No RC required

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5611 - Therapeutic Diets and Menu Planning


    This course explores the use of whole foods, traditional dietary patterns, and therapeutic meal plans to prevent and treat health concerns. Students learn when and how to apply the science of “food as medicine” by reviewing research supporting health outcomes from therapeutic diets. Students develop, analyze and share practical whole-foods based menus and recipes that comply with the dietary instructions of restrictive diets, exchanged-based diets, elimination diets and cultural meal patterns.  Knowledge areas explored include benefits of bioactive food compounds, effects of acculturation on diet and health, sustainable food production, and economic and social constraints of healthy diets.   Prerequisite(s): IFN 5520  (or evidence of college-level nutrition course) 3 credit(s)
    Offered: SU-Term A Course Length: 8 weeks No RC required

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5661 - Nutritional Foundations of Mental Health


    This course provides an overview of the practical and scientific approaches to understanding the impact that food has on mental health. Topics in this course will include learning about the quality and variety of food that is available to us, its impact on mental health, and the influence that nutrition has on brain development and maintenance throughout the life cycle. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term A/B Course Length: 15 weeks No RC required

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5663 - Sports and Exercise Nutrition


    This course explores the roles of macro and micronutrients in fueling energy systems and applies this knowledge to make nutritional recommendations for physically active persons, with considerations for intense training and competition. Examination of popular performance enhancing/ergogenic aids and the fundamentals of energy balance, exercise and weight control are discussed. Prerequisite(s): IFN 5520  (or evidence of an undergraduate or graduate level nutrition science course). 3 credit(s)
    Offered: SU - Term A Course Length: 8 weeks No RC requirement

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5670 - Foundations of Integrative and Functional Nutrition


    Students taking this course will expand upon their knowledge of basic nutrition science and gain a foundational understanding of the integrative and functional approach to nutrition.  The course reviews the fundamental principles and perspectives of conventional, traditional, integrative, and functional medical models to identify best practices for nutritional care.  Students learn about the concepts and tools used within these practices and how they align with the integrative practitioner’s goal for personalized, whole-person, relationship-centered, and environmentally sensitive care. Prerequisite(s): IFN 5520  (or proof of previous nutrition coursework) 3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term A, SP-Term A Course Length: 7 weeks No RC Required

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5673 - Integrative Approaches to the Digestive System


    Proponents of integrative and functional medicine recognize digestive health is often the necessary first step in the healing process.  Nutritional interventions through food, eating, and mind/body skills are essential parts of the holistic healing process.  This course will focus on the structure and function of the digestive tract and the impact and influence of food and eating on health and disease.  Topics include: eating and digesting, optimal nutrient assimilation, intestinal barrier defense, the influence of gut microbiota on health, the gut-brain axis, adverse food reactions, autoimmune disorders, and other systemic illnesses and digestive diseases. Prerequisite(s): IFN 5520  (or proof of previous nutrition coursework), IFN 5704  (or proof of previous Anatomy/Physiology coursework) 3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term A, SP-Term A Course Length: 7 weeks No RC Required

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5676 - Dietary Supplements and Herbal Medicine


    This course examines one of the most common modalities of integrative medicine: dietary and herbal supplements.  The course provides an overview of the regulations that govern manufacturing, sales, and marketing of dietary supplements. Students will use reliable and peer-reviewed resources to critically evaluate the proposed benefits, efficacy, and safety of supplements in order to inform client recommendations.   3.0 credits.

      Prerequisite(s): IFN 5520  (or proof of previous nutrition coursework) 3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term B Course Length: 7 weeks No RC required


Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5677 - Integrative and Functional Nutrition: Therapeutics


    This course examines chronic disease pathophysiology, as it relates to integrative and functional nutrition therapy. The course prepares students to apply the nutritional care process towards restoring function and managing core clinical imbalances and symptoms. Students learn to evaluate and compose nutrition care plans using case-simulation examples. Prerequisite(s): IFN 5611 IFN 5673 IFN 5676 IFN 5688 , and IFN 5689  3 credit(s)
    Offered: SP-Term B Course Length: 7 weeks No RC required

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5681 - Systems Biology I


    Systems Biology explains the physiology, pathophysiology and applicable biochemistry that underlie the seven core imbalances within functional medicine.  Understanding the physiological systems, and how they become unbalanced, is key to identifying and supporting interventions that address chronic disease.   In Systems Biology I, students explore cardiovascular function; immunity and inflammation; digestion, absorption, and elimination.  They examine how core imbalances within these systems contribute to chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease, autoimmunity, food allergy and intolerance, and gastrointestinal disorders. Prerequisite(s): IFN 5520 , IFN 5688 , IFN 5703  , IFN 5704   3 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall A/B, Spring A/B Course Length: 15 weeks No RC required

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5682 - Systems Biology II


    Systems Biology II is an extension of the concepts learned in Systems Biology I.  In Systems Biology II, students explore the endocrine system, nervous system, musculoskeletal system, liver and mitochondrial function.  They learn how core imbalances within these systems apply to chronic disorders related to blood glucose regulation, cortisol and stress response, depression, chronic pain, and fatigue.
      Prerequisite(s): IFN 5520 , IFN 5681 , IFN 5688 , IFN 5703 , IFN 5704   3 credit(s)
    Offered: Spring A/B Course Length: 15 weeks No RC required

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5685 - Field Experience in Nutrition


    Students electing to take this course will complete a minimum of 100 hours and up to 250 hours of supervised practice experience in nutrition setting of their choice.  The field experience will allow students the opportunity to observe and practice under an experienced professional.  Appropriate settings may include hospitals or health clinics; research facilities; schools, nursing homes or community centers; public health, industry, or government facilities; and food or agricultural settings Prerequisite(s): IFN 5670 , IFN 5681 , IFN 5688 , and IFN 5689   3 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall A/B, Spring A/B, Summer A Course Length: 15 weeks or 8 weeks in Summer No RC required

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5688 - Advanced Nutritional Biochemistry—Macronutrients


    Understanding root cause of disease requires an understanding of cellular metabolism and the network of pathways that connect systems. This course takes an applied approach to studying how biochemical reactions of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins within the cell affect whole body health.  Homeostatic mechanisms regulating macronutrient metabolism and the cellular and systemic responses to nutritional imbalances are studied in the context of several common diseases. Methods to assess macronutrient requirements and status are incorporated throughout the course. Prerequisite(s): IFN 5520  (or documentation of 3 credits of college-level nutrition coursework), IFN 5703  (or documentation of 3 credits of college-level biochemistry or organic chemistry, IFN 5704  (or documentation of 3 credits of college-level Anatomy/Physiology). 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall A/B, Spring A/B Course Length: 15 weeks No RC required.

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5689 - Advanced Nutritional Biochemistry—Micronutrients


    This course studies the molecular, cellular and metabolic functions of vitamins and minerals and how they affect health.  Clinical methods of assessing micronutrient status and the effects of deficiency or toxicity will be studied, as will the influence of genetic variability on micronutrient requirements and functions.  Prerequisite(s): IFN 5520  (or documentation of 3 credits of college-level nutrition coursework), IFN 5703  (or documentation of 3 credits of college-level biochemistry or organic chemistry), IFN 5704  (or documentation of 3 credits of college-level Anatomy/Physiology). 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall A/B, Spring A/B Course Length: 15 weeks No RC required.

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5694 - Nutrition-Focused Physical Exam


    This course prepares students for subjective nutrition assessment, including identifying systems, signs, and symptoms that are associated with subclinical or latent disease states, and nutrition-focused physical exam indicators of macronutrient and micronutrient adequacy, insufficiency, deficiency, and excess/toxicity. Prerequisite(s): IFN 5520  (or documentation of 3 credits of college-level nutrition coursework, IFN 5703  (or documentation of 3 credits of college-level biochemistry or organic chemistry), IFN 5704  (or documentation of 3 credits of college-level Anatomy/Physiology). 3 credit(s)
    Offered: SU Course Length: 8 weeks No RC required.

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5703 - General Biochemistry


    This course provides a comprehensive overview of biochemistry, including structure, molecular function, and the regulation of cellular metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, and other biologically important compounds, with integration into overall anabolic and catabolic metabolic processes. IFN 5703 General Biochemistry satisfies the General Biochemistry basic sciences requirement for the master’s degree program in Integrative and Functional Nutrition, and the course prerequisite for IFN 5688 and IFN 5689 Advanced Nutritional Biochemistry Macronutrients and Micronutrients, respectively. Prerequisite(s): None. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term B, SP-Term B Course Length: 7 weeks No RC required.

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5704 - Anatomy and Physiology


    This course provides a structural and functional overview of the body’s organs and systems.  Students will learn about the anatomical organization, physiological processes, and homeostatic mechanisms throughout the body.  This course satisfies the  Anatomy and Physiology basic sciences requirement for the MS and PhD programs in Integrative and Functional Nutrition, and fulfills the course prerequisite for various advanced IFN courses. Prerequisite(s): None 3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term A/B and SP - Term A/B Course Length: 15 weeks No RC required

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5705 - Psychobiology of Eating


    What to eat? When to eat? What not to eat?… The act of eating is a result of a complex interaction of biological, psychological, and social systems. For some, daily decisions about food and eating are easily made.  For others, they become an arduous and challenge-filled activity. This course bridges the gap between the human physiology of nutrition and the psychology that influences our food preferences, food/mood connections, and the pathways towards disordered eating patterns. Students will develop a foundational understanding of the behavior of eating and mechanisms that help people make choices that are essential to health and well-being.  It explores the continuum of eating behavior, from healthy eating practices to problematic and disordered habits, as well as identifies contributors of unhealthy eating practices and uncovers potential interventions to restore health and balance from an integrative perspective. Prerequisite(s): None. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: SP-Term A/B Course Length: 15 weeks No RC required.

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5900 - Integrative Approaches to Chronic Disease


    Obesity, heart disease, and diabetes are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality, globally.  In this course, students will learn about the multi-faceted causes and consequences of these conditions.  Through evaluation of research, students will develop an evidence-based integrative approach to prevent and manage these chronic diseases.  Prerequisite(s): IFN 5670 , IFN 5688   3 credit(s)
    Offered: SU - Term A Course Length: 8 weeks No RC required

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 5910 - Biostatistics


    This course provides scholar-practitioners of the biomedical sciences a foundational understanding of biostatistics used in designing, interpreting, and applying research.  Topics covered include descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, hypothesis testing, correlation analyses, and comparisons of means.  Students will perform calculations using sample datasets and demonstrate their understanding of concepts through course discussions.  The course is valuable for current and future health practitioners and researchers who are either unfamiliar with statistical methods or those wanting to freshen up their knowledge. Prerequisite(s): none 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall A/B, Spring A/B Course Length: 15 weeks No RC required

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 6100 - PhD IFN Seminar


    Students enrolled in the PhD IFN seminar will develop and give professional, evidence-based presentations and respond to questions from those in attendance. Prerequisite(s): Completed 50% of coursework 1 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall A/B; Spring A/B Course Length: 15 weeks No RC required

Other Courses

  
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    IFN 8100 - Independent Study in Nutrition


    This course gives students the opportunity to gain knowledge in a nutrition-related topic that is not offered through the standard curriculum. Students must propose the topic of study and explain its relevance to their degree. They must identify an instructor with subject matter expertise who is willing to supervise the work.  A proposal with the course description, learning outcomes, instructional format, and assessment methods must be signed by the student and the instructor and approved by the department chair prior to registration. To pursue an independent study, students must be in good academic standing and have completed most of their required coursework. For each assigned credit unit, the student must complete approximately 45 hours of directed study.  The course may be taken during any term. Prerequisite(s): Completed 50% of coursework. 1 - 4 credit(s)
    Offered: Any Term Course Length: 8/16 weeks No RC required.

Other Courses

  
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    MAL 0601 - NOLS Virtual Orientation


    Virtual orientation to prepare new MAL NOLS students for their first semester and expedition.

      0 credit(s)

Other Courses

  
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    MAM 8009 - Innovative Leadership: Principles & Practices


    Innovation in leadership requires the capacity to be entrepreneurial, adaptive, decisive, collaborative, and ethical. This course introduces the core principles required to launch intrepreneurial and entrepreneurial efforts in a variety of organizational settings. It identifies the competencies required to create an innovative mindset in an organization. Students will explore a range of theories of innovation, their limitations and applications.  Particular attention is given to the characteristics of leading successful change efforts and to the analysis of a variety of examples of innovations. Students will be encouraged to launch innovations in their practice of leadership and management. 3 credit(s)

Across all degree programs

  
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    ALL 0700 - Academic Writing


    Academic Writing is a one-credit tutorial that provides substantive support for students seeking to develop writing skills that allow them to meet APA- and graduate-level standards. Recognizing that students have diverse needs, the course has been structured to be flexible enough to accommodate each student’s experience and needs by offering three writing approaches: process, product, and personal voice. There are no prerequisites for Academic Writing 0700. Enrollment can be by student’s choice, required at admission, or recommended to the student by content course instructors at any time during the program. Students may take up to 3 credits of Academic Writing over the duration of their program at Saybrook. Enrollments beyond the 3-credit limit will be on a non-credit basis only. 1 credit(s)
  
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    ALL 0701 - Academic Writing


    Academic Writing is a one-credit tutorial that provides substantive support for students seeking to develop writing skills that allow them to meet APA- and graduate-level standards. Recognizing that students have diverse needs, the course has been structured to be flexible enough to accommodate each student’s experience and needs by offering three writing approaches: process, product, and personal voice. There are no prerequisites for ALL 0700 - Academic Writing . Enrollment can be by student’s choice, required at admission, or recommended to the student by content course instructors at any time during the program. Students may take up to 3 credits of Academic Writing over the duration of their program at Saybrook. Enrollments beyond the 3-credit limit will be on a non-credit basis only. 1 credit(s)
  
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    ALL 0702 - Academic Writing


    Academic Writing is a one-credit tutorial that provides substantive support for students seeking to develop writing skills that allow them to meet APA- and graduate-level standards. Recognizing that students have diverse needs, the course has been structured to be flexible enough to accommodate each student’s experience and needs by offering three writing approaches: process, product, and personal voice. There are no prerequisites for ALL 0700 - Academic Writing . Enrollment can be by student’s choice, required at admission, or recommended to the student by content course instructors at any time during the program. Students may take up to 3 credits of Academic Writing over the duration of their program at Saybrook. Enrollments beyond the 3-credit limit will be on a non-credit basis only. 1 credit(s)
  
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    ALL 0703 - Academic Writing


    Academic Writing is a one-credit tutorial that provides substantive support for students seeking to develop writing skills that allow them to meet APA- and graduate-level standards. Recognizing that students have diverse needs, the course has been structured to be flexible enough to accommodate each student’s experience and needs by offering three writing approaches: process, product, and personal voice. There are no prerequisites for ALL 0700 - Academic Writing . Enrollment can be by student’s choice, required at admission, or recommended to the student by content course instructors at any time during the program. Students may take up to 3 credits of Academic Writing over the duration of their program at Saybrook. Enrollments beyond the 3-credit limit will be on a non-credit basis only. 0 credit(s)
  
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    ALL 0704 - Academic Writing


    Academic Writing is a one-credit tutorial that provides substantive support for students seeking to develop writing skills that allow them to meet APA- and graduate-level standards. Recognizing that students have diverse needs, the course has been structured to be flexible enough to accommodate each student’s experience and needs by offering three writing approaches: process, product, and personal voice. There are no prerequisites for ALL 0700 - Academic Writing . Enrollment can be by student’s choice, required at admission, or recommended to the student by content course instructors at any time during the program. Students may take up to 3 credits of Academic Writing over the duration of their program at Saybrook. Enrollments beyond the 3-credit limit will be on a non-credit basis only. 0 credit(s)
  
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    ALL 0705 - Academic Writing


    Academic Writing is a one-credit tutorial that provides substantive support for students seeking to develop writing skills that allow them to meet APA- and graduate-level standards. Recognizing that students have diverse needs, the course has been structured to be flexible enough to accommodate each student’s experience and needs by offering three writing approaches: process, product, and personal voice. There are no prerequisites for ALL 0700 - Academic Writing . Enrollment can be by student’s choice, required at admission, or recommended to the student by content course instructors at any time during the program. Students may take up to 3 credits of Academic Writing over the duration of their program at Saybrook. Enrollments beyond the 3-credit limit will be on a non-credit basis only. 0 credit(s)
  
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    ALL 8100 - Independent Study


    At Saybrook University, we welcome the opportunity for students to engage in an in-depth exploration of topics that might not be offered within an already-approved course format within one of the degree programs. Students come to Saybrook with myriad interests, and the exploration of new and emerging topics is an exciting and stimulating endeavor. This student-driven course affords the student an opportunity to engage any Saybrook faculty regarding the topic of interest and the course can be offered for 1 - 3 credits; this is to be determined by the student in consultation with the instructor. Independent Study must be approved by student’s department chair before course can be registered. Master’s degree students may take a maximum of 6 credits of Independent Study during the master’s program. Doctoral students may take a maximum of 9 credits of Independent Study during the doctoral program. 1-3 credit(s)
  
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    IS 600B - Global Leadership, Networking, and Cultural Intelligence


    Organizations of all types operate as dynamic distributed networks in a global arena. As business professionals managers are challenged to strategically engage a highly talented and culturally diverse workforce. They are to unleash their creativity so they can grapple with complex situations, establish knowledge sharing networks utilizing technology, collaboratively devise innovative solutions, make decisive decisions, and take action to enable the organization reach its goals. As ethical professionals, global leaders and managers are called to be civic global citizens who aid organizations be active responsible global community members. Through interactive face-to-face and virtual learning activities with European professionals this course provides opportunities for students to network with US and European professionals and to develop skills in:  critically devising global business operations in light of their historical, economic, political, and social contexts; managing distributed teams using technology to create dynamic virtual workplaces where people meet and engage with each other; establishing collaborative workplace environments that draw upon the strengths of diverse cultural worldviews, their approaches to leadership, work relationships, problem-solving, and professional ethics, and their lifestyles and sense of recreation; and envision equitable economic and sustainable business models and practices. This course includes an in-country immersion experience. 3 credit(s)

Applied Psychophysiology

  
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    APH 4101 - Essentials of Bioscience


    Teaches the fundamentals of electronic circuitry, biochemistry, human electricity, math, & human physiology as used in professional psychophysiology.
    Required knowledge of electronic circuitry must be sufficient to understand how a psychophysiological recording device functions and what the controls actually do including roll-off, signal to noise ratios, frequency spectrums, etc. Knowledge of biochemistry must be sufficient to understand the structure of major neurotransmitters, behavior - enzyme interactions, etc. Knowledge of human electricity must be sufficient to understand impulse propagation, direction of electric fields, etc. Knowledge of mathematics must be sufficient to understand behavioral genetics, field studies, and basic statistics. Knowledge of human physiology must be sufficient to understand synapses, motor chains, hormonal feedback cycles, respiration - SNS complexes, etc. as used in professional psychophysiology. 3 credit(s)
  
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    APH 4201 - Essentials of Pathopsychology


    This course provides the essential knowledge of psychopathology needed to properly assess psychophysiological dysfunctions and select the optimal interventions. Students must know the physiological bases of common psychological disorders and have sufficient skills in interviewing & assessment to determine whether patients are appropriate for psychophysiological interventions. They must be able to adequately assess normal people desiring training in optimal functioning to be reasonably certain that these people are appropriate for such training. 3 credit(s)
  
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    APH 4301 - Essentials of Pathophysiology


    This course provides students with essential knowledge of the major physiological disorders / diseases whose symptoms mimic behavioral disorders. It also teaches students to recognize the basic ways both the brain and body fail either functionally or structurally to produce psychophysiological symptoms or they cannot master the field. Without this knowledge, students do not have the medical and physiological knowledge needed to perform psychophysiological assessments and interventions. 3 credit(s)
  
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    APH 4514 - Master’s Thesis


    The thesis gives students a chance to apply their new skills in research design, subject recruitment, data gathering, data analysis, and writing a formal paper to actual subjects by performing a small but important research study which the students designed during APH5121 and APH5122. Producing a paper of sufficient quality to be submitted to a high quality journal serves as a milestone indicating mastery of psychophysiological principles and research.
    Students do not begin this course until (a) the instructor in APH5122 has approved the practice protocol and the IRB documents and (b) the IRB has approved the IRB submission. 3 credit(s)
  
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    APH 5001 - General Biology


    Students needing to meet the prerequisite of having had an undergraduate course in general biology will register for General Biology. The overall objective is for students to learn material and concepts within the subject matter of the course which is needed to form a solid basis for performing graduate level work in psychophysiology. Students will become familiar with the concepts and material usually covered in the course by doing readings in the assigned standard text and other materials, individual real-time discussions with faculty via the web, and developing answers to topic related questions. Prerequisite(s): No pre-requisites. 1 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term A/B, SP-Term A/B. Course Length: 15 weeks. No RC component.
  
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    APH 5002 - General Psychology


    Students needing to meet the prerequisite of having had an undergraduate course in general psychology will register for General Psychology. The overall objective is for students to learn material and concepts within the subject matter of the course which is needed to form a solid basis for performing graduate level work in psychophysiology. Students will become familiar with the concepts and material usually covered in the course by doing readings in the assigned standard text and other materials, individual real-time discussions with faculty via the web, and developing answers to topic related questions. Prerequisite(s): No pre-requisites. 1 credit(s)
    Offered: FFA-Term A/B, SP-Term A/B. Course Length: 15 weeks. No RC component.
  
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    APH 5051 - Fundamentals of Psychophysiology


    This course explores the manifold ways the brain and body work together to produce behavior and the cycle between behavior and physiology. The course begins with a description of the body’s organizational structure and genetics as related to behavior. The basic physiological ways information is received from the external and internal environments through a variety of sensors and then processed by the hormonal / nervous system are described. Typical psychophysiological dysfunctions and interventions are also described. Prerequisite(s): Pre-requisites: Undergraduate courses in psychology and biology (or APH 5001  , APH 5002 ). 3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term A/B, SP-Term A/B. Course Length: 15 weeks. No RC component.
  
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    APH 5053 - Introduction to Psychophysiology Recording


    New psychophysiology students just entering the program need to be exposed to and practice utilizing typical psychophysiological recording and biofeedback equipment so they can relate to material presented in their first term introductory courses. They also need to learn the typical process through which the equipment is utilized. This one-day laboratory experience is intended to accomplish this requirement. 0 credit(s)
    Offered: Held at the students’ first RC.
  
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    APH 5071 - Anatomy and Physiology for Psychophysiologists


    This course provides an overview of human anatomy and physiology as applied to psychophysiology, optimal functioning, and behavioral medicine. The course emphasizes human behavioral biology. Each basic structure and organ system is discussed with regard to both anatomical structures and physiological functions as they change over time and in relation to both the external and internal environment. The main course objective is to provide the depth of knowledge required to understand the physical bases for psychophysiological problems and interventions.  Interactions between the complex web of hormonal feed-back loops and dysregulation of behavior, emotions, and drives is discussed in relation to implementation of behavioral interventions. Other areas emphasized are respiratory physiology, behavioral immunology, psychophysiology of pain, interactions between pain, stress, and muscle tension, pathophysiology of headache, cardiovascular disease and hypertension, and basic kinesiological concepts. Prerequisite(s): Undergraduate courses in psychology and biology (or APH 5001 , APH 5002 ) and APH 5051  or APH 5052 .      3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA-Term A/B, SP-Term A/B. Course Length: 15 weeks. Students taking this course must also attend the one day anatomy & physiology laboratory experience held during Saybrook University’s residential conferences and AABP’s annual meeting.
  
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    APH 5101 - Psychophysiological Recording, Assessment, and Interventions


    This course provides a basic understanding of the physiology and methodology underlying common psychophysiological recording techniques used in behavioral medicine including surface electromyography, electroencephalography, respiration, blood pressure, pulse rate, skin temperature, and electrodermal responses. Sufficient knowledge about how common psychophysiological recording and biofeedback instruments function and are used is provided so students can incorporate psychophysiological aspects of assessment into their normal practices. This course also teaches the principles and applications of general biofeedback as used in educational and clinical settings. The strengths and weaknesses of evidence supporting the use of biofeedback for a variety of clinical disorders is reviewed and the techniques for actually doing biofeedback are detailed. Techniques for using biofeedback as a tool for shaping and conditioning responses to stress are emphasized. The laboratory portion of the courses provides sufficient hands on exposure to typical, clinical grade psychophysiological recording and biofeedback equipment and techniques that students will be able to recognize adequate and inadequate signals and be able to attach sensors to their patients appropriately so that good signals can be recorded. Prerequisite(s): APH 5622   3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term A/B, SP-Term A/B. Course Length: 15 Weeks. 2 day RC Required.
  
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    APH 5111 - Genetic Foundations of Behavior


    This course explores the impact of genetics on human behavior in relation to the environment. Behavioral genetics addresses questions such as: “How do genes determine behavior? How much of behavior is nature versus nurture? How do behaviors evolve?” The course and its text provide “a range of examples, such as laboratory studies on flies and mice, field observations on species as diverse as butterflies and meerkats, as well as human behavioral disorders. Students will become familiar with “genetic principles with neurobiological and ecological perspectives so they learn how to find and map genes that affect behaviors. They will also learn how the coordinated expression of ensembles of these genes enables the nervous system to express complex behaviors in response to changes in the environment.”  Prerequisite(s): APH 5051  or APH 5052 . 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: Summer Semester. Course Length: 12 weeks. No RC required.
  
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    APH 5121 - Methodology in Psychophysiological Research


    This course covers the basic steps and time-line of a project, steps in formulating and maturing a question, research ethics, the protocol approval process, background and literature searches, and methods of determining a project’s feasibility and relevance. The logic and progression of study designs used to evaluate the efficacy of behavioral medicine studies is detailed and exemplified. Topics include single subject and single group designs - cohorts, multiple group designs, strengths and weaknesses of longitudinal and cross-sectional studies, prospective experimental vs. observational and retrospective designs. Students will learn about the strengths and weaknesses of such techniques as quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, meta-analysis, time series analysis, and population based data analysis. The course also covers research protocol design, the consent form, and the protocol review process. This section covers subject selection techniques (sampling, inclusion - exclusion, etc.), kinds of data (dichotomous, nominal, ordinal, continuous, etc.), techniques for hardening subjective data, validity and reliability, survey and questionnaire design, as well as pilot studies and the initial power analysis - feasibility and resources.  3 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall - Term A/B, SP — Term A/B. Course Length: 15 weeks. No RC required.
  
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    APH 5122 - Data Analysis in Psychophysiological Research


    This course covers the information students need to know how data are analyzed in typical psychophysiological studies. The course helps students understand what the typical tests are, when they should be used, and the underlying assumptions for each test. This is crucial because these are the techniques which should be seen when reading studies involving psychophysiology. If typical tests are not used in a study or the data do not meet the underlying assumptions of the tests, students will know not to trust the study’s results.  Students learn how to actually perform each of the tests on a variety of types of data so they will have confidence in their abilities to use the tests in their research. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall - Term A/B, SP - Term A/B. Course Length: 15 weeks. No RC required.
  
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    APH 5123 - Practice Research Study in Psychophysiology


    The practice study gives students a chance to apply their new skills in subject recruitment, data gathering, and data analysis to actual subjects by participating in a preapproved research study designed during APH5121 and APH5122. Students must NOT begin this course until (a) the instructor in APH5122 has approved the practice protocol and the IRB documents and (b) the IRB has approved the IRB submission. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall - Term A/B, SP — Term A/B & Summer. Course Length: 15 weeks during Fall and spring semesters. 12 weeks during summer semester. No RC required.
  
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    APH 5124 - Psychophysiology Department Comprehensive Exam


    After completion of all non-dissertation coursework and prior to the oral dissertation defense, each student has to pass a written comprehensive examination.

    For each comprehensive examination, each professor who has taught a lecture course to the student submits two essay questions for each of the lecture courses they teach in the program. The student selects one of the two questions for each course to answer. The questions must be designed so they can be answered within two double spaced typed pages using 12- point font size characters. The questions must test the student’s understanding of a crucial basic concept and the student’s ability to apply that concept to applied psychophysiology rather than requiring a list of facts.

    The examination is open book as it deals with understanding and applying concepts rather than listing facts. The facts supporting the answer must be written as part of each answer. The student being tested arranges a test date with the program’s chair. On the date of the exam, the director e-mails the exam to the student and the student has 48 hours to email the answers to the director. No answers are accepted after the 48-hour limit. The student may not contact anybody who could help with the exam in any way, including faculty members who supplied the exam questions, during the exam period without explicit, written permission from the chair. When the student emails the answered exam to the director, the director emails the answers to the faculty member who supplied the question unless the faculty member has supplied an acceptable answer. Faculty members have two weeks to grade the exam. Questions are graded only pass or fail. If an answer is rated as a failure, the faculty member must provide a brief critique explaining why the answer failed.

    The student must pass 80% of the questions to pass the exam. A student who fails the comprehensive may attempt questions from the failed subject areas twice with not less than one month between each attempt. Different questions are supplied to the student for each attempt. If the student does not pass on the third attempt (the original and two retries), the student is dropped from the program. The student can appeal grading of an answer first to the department chair and then to the dean of students. 0 credit(s)

  
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    APH 5125 - Individual Research Focus


    This course is designed to give each student majoring in psychophysiology an opportunity to explore any aspect of research not adequately covered by the department’s required research courses. The student works with her / his advisor to determine what should be accomplished during the course. Students may choose to take an advanced research course given by any department at Saybrook, take training in specific techniques not covered in any Saybrook course, perform a small study of special interest, perform an in-depth review of some aspect of the research literature related to his / her dissertation, get extra training and experience in statistical techniques related to the dissertation, perform pilot work to clarify techniques to use in the dissertation, etc. Prerequisite(s): APH 5121 , APH 5122 , APH 5123  and permission of the APH Department Chair. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA Term A/B, SP Term A/B, Summer. Course Length: 15 weeks during Fall and Spring Semesters, 12 weeks during Summer Semester. No RC Required.
  
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    APH 5151 - Pain Assessment and Intervention


    This course describes the underlying psychophysiology of pain and summarizes the strengths and weaknesses of evidence supporting the efficacy of self-regulatory interventions for prevention and reduction of various pain problems. Interactions between pain, stress, and muscle tension are emphasized. Extensive examples of how to perform psychophysiological interventions for various psychophysiologically maintained and magnified pain states are provided. The pathophysiology of migraine, tension, cluster, rebound, medication induced, and other types of headaches is reviewed. Current schema for differential diagnosis of the various types of headache are discussed in relation to interactions between behavioral medicine providers, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, neurologists, and other health care providers. The evidence supporting the efficacy of behavioral interventions for various types of headaches is reviewed. Detailed examples of patient education and training materials are provided along with typical behavioral training regimes and pathways. Prerequisite(s): APH 5051  or APH 5052 . 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: Summer Semester. Course Length: 12 weeks. No RC required.
  
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    APH 5181 - Hormonal and Perceptual Influences on Behavior


    Hormones have huge impacts of many aspects of our behavior ranging from instinctive sexual behaviors through identification of likely spouses, how we remember events, patterns of play, etc. Differences in our perceptual abilities result in our perceiving the world so differently that they influence many of our fears and believes about what is around us. This course explores the mechanisms through which hormones and perceptions lead to many of our most fundamental beliefs and the behaviors based on them. Prerequisite(s): APH 5051  or APH 5052 . 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Summer Semester. Course Length: 12 weeks. No RC required.
  
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    APH 5201 - Principles and Theories of Stress Management


    This course provides the basic information on the principles and theories underlying the application of stress management techniques in a variety of settings including the workplace, schools, and clinical practice. The course provides a historical perspective on development of these practices and a comparative approach to their use among the world’s cultures. Methods for identification of stressors are emphasized. Practices reviewed include meditation, autogenic exercises, humor, progressive muscle relaxation training and many others. Evidence supporting the efficacy of these practices in preventing and correcting stress related problems is detailed. The indications, non-indications and contra-indications of relaxation therapies are discussed. The course then provides detailed instruction in how to perform these techniques including typical multi-session regimes, handout, etc. The laboratory gives students a chance to practice these techniques under supervision on each other. Prerequisite(s): APH 5051  or APH 5052  and APH 5101 . 3 credit(s)
    Course Length: 15 weeks. 1 day RC required.
  
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    APH 5221 - Stimulation Technologies


    This course provides sufficient information on psychophysiological entrainment and stimulation for students to understand how various forms of physical stimulation are used to alter the brain and body’s functioning. Topics include (1) magnetic stimulation of the periphery to induce changes in peripheral blood flow, (2) magnetic stimulation of the brain to induce out of body experiences and control headaches, (3) physiological entrainment of breathing for control of hypertension, (4) Basics of arousal and dysarousal, (5) review of QEEG and HRV in relation to entrainment, (6) Physiology of AVE, (7) Standard Studies on AVE, (8) Cognitive Studies on AVE, (9) CES, (10) tDCS, (11) HRV - breath-work exercise, (12) Programming with the DAVID Session Editor, (13) use of “alphastim”-like devices to alter states of consciousness, and (14) neuromodulation including rTMS, etc. Prerequisite(s): APH 5051  or APH 5052  and APH 5101 . 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Summer Semester. Course Length: 12 weeks. 1 day RC required.
  
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    APH 5251 - Neuropsychophysiology


    The course covers central and peripheral nervous system anatomy and physiology and finishes with an emphasis on nervous system pathophysiology. The brain/spinal cord plexus is discussed from both anatomical and physiological perspectives concentrating on plasticity in response to changes in the external and internal environment as well as viewing the system as an interactive organ with hormonal, nerve based, and blood flow based feedback and control systems. Current theories of memory formation and change with time and emotions are emphasized, as are effects of emotions and the environment on brain function. Psychophysiological recording methodology including EEG and scans such as MEG and PET are examined in relation to their uses in behavioral medicine. Neurological disorders centered on the CNS (such as epilepsy) are discussed in relationship to psychophysiological evaluations and behavioral interventions. The anatomy and physiology of the autonomic and somatic branches of the peripheral nervous system are discussed to provide a basic understanding how the system works in relationship with the whole body’s function and health. Emphasis is on the ever-changing balance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic portions of the autonomic nervous system that alters functions of nerves, glands, and muscles which can be trained to achieve a balanced life. The impact of the somatic nervous system on perception and action is also emphasized. Prerequisite(s): APH 5051 , APH 5101  and APH 5271   3 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall Semester. Course Length: 15 weeks. 1 day RC required.
  
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    APH 5271 - EEG Biofeedback: Assessment and Intervention


    This course teaches the principles of recording the brain’s electrical activities through EEG, as well as other imaging techniques, that pertain to applied to psychophysiological assessments and interventions. The basic psychophysiology of the EEG signal is reviewed in relationship to educational applications and disorders (such as epilepsy and ADHD) treated with EEG biofeedback. The strengths and weaknesses of evidence supporting the use of EEG biofeedback for a variety of clinical disorders is reviewed and the techniques for actually doing EEG biofeedback are detailed. Prerequisite(s): APH 5051 . 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall A/B. Course Length: 15 weeks. 1 day RC required.
  
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    APH 5281 - Advanced EEG Biofeedback: Theoretical and Clinical Considerations


    EEG Biofeedback has radically expanded over the past 10 years. As a result, the list of treatment options can seem overwhelming. Amidst the clamor of competing ideologies, manufacturers and treatment modalities, it is the responsibility of the advanced EEG biofeedback clinician to create a treatment approach that is effective and engaging for the trainee/patient/client. This class moves beyond the introduction to basic EEG feedback modalities and equipment, and into an overview of the state of the art of EEG, and the subsequent options and complex treatment decisions that are necessary in operating competently in the modern Neurofeedback climate.  Prerequisite(s): APH 5271 . 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: Summer semester. Course Length: 12 weeks.
  
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    APH 5301 - Behaviorally Oriented Techniques


    The course covers five main areas: (a) wellness and community / group psychophysiology, (b) operant and classical conditioning, (c) imagery, (d) cognitive restructuring, and (e) meditation techniques. Wellness programs for maintaining and increasing the health of individuals and of specific communities such as students in a class, older people in an assisted living community, workers in an office or factory are becoming increasingly popular. The evidence supporting the efficacy of these programs is reviewed and ways to optimize such programs, in light of this evidence, for different groups is discussed. Classical operant and instrumental conditioning are powerful tools which can be used to shape the behavior of individuals and groups in the work/school and clinical setting. The history of, supporting evidence for, and basic techniques for each type of conditioning are presented. The standard techniques of self-hypnosis, and imagery training are described and students are taught the elements of their application. Uses of these techniques with specific types of patients and integration of these techniques into other behavioral medicine interventions is discussed. The history, supporting efficacy studies, and basis for the major meditation techniques are described in relation to self-regulation. Prerequisite(s): APH 5051  or APH 5052 . 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall semester. Course Length: 15 weeks. No RC required.
  
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    APH 5351 - Clinical Psychopharmacology


    Students develop a foundational understanding in psychopharmacology important to client-oriented clinical practice in counseling. Students develop skills in forming a collaborative team with the client and the prescribing health professional. The course surveys fundamental diagnoses that may be accompanied by psychotropic medications and methods to help clients monitor medication effectiveness. The course emphasizes psychoactive medications within a biopsychosocial understanding of the client. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Summer semester. Course Length: 12 weeks. No RC required.
  
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    APH 5401 - Psychophysiological Assessment and Treatment of Sleep


    This course covers the basic psychophysiology of sleep and sleep disorders as well as psychophysiological and other methods of assessing sleep. The basics of sleep cannot be understood without a firm understanding of biological rhythms so this topic will be covered as it relates to sleep. Prerequisite(s): APH 5051  or APH 5052  and APH 5101 . 3.0 credit(s)
    Course Length: 15 weeks.
  
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    APH 5451 - Optimal Functioning: Psychophysiological Applications in the Community, School, Sports, and Workplace


    Effectively working within large organizations to increase work efficiency, decrease accidents, and increase morale while decreasing stress related absences, disorders, and conflicts is a complex task being requested by more and more employers as the impact of stress on the workforce become better recognized. Optimal performance in these environments is difficult but achievable with appropriate training. The research supporting the efficacy of such efforts is reviewed and the typical techniques for interventions with diverse groups are illustrated. A wide variety of behavioral interventions have been effective in enhancing and optimizing performance in many settings. Effects include increased endurance and accuracy under many circumstances - especially within sports and the military. The evidence supporting this assertion is reviewed and examples are provided of specific interventions shown to be effective in specific circumstances. Effective presentation of behavioral medicine concepts to diverse groups is a daunting task which requires considerable training and experience. Practices are frequently augmented through communicating with peers, other health care professionals and administrators, the public, and potential patients. Effective methods for presenting to each type of group are very different but have been well worked out. Typical presentation methods for workshops, lectures, and public appearances are presented which are likely to optimize understanding of behavioral medicine techniques.  Prerequisite(s): APH 5051  or APH 5052  and APH 5101 . 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Spring Semester. Course Length: 15 weeks. No RC required.
  
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    APH 5470 - Optimal Functioning in the Sports and Performing Arts Environment


    This course provides students with the depth of knowledge and skills needed to assess athletic performance and train athletes to recognize then correct psychological and psychophysiological barriers to optimal functioning. Students will learn to apply the principles of sports psychology to psychophysiological assessments and interventions designed to detect and rectify such problems as incorrect timing and patterns of breathing, muscle acceleration tension relationships, and stress responses having impacts on performance. Students will learn about the experimental analyses elucidating how people behave in the sports environment and ways to use this information to develop performance strategies to enhance motivation, optimize team dynamics, and minimize burnout. 3 credit(s)
    Course Length: 15 weeks. No RC required.
  
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    APH 5515 - Graduate Colloquium


    The Graduate Colloquium class is a virtual online orientation to the fundamentals of graduate study and to the field of applied psychophysiology.  This course is designed to support new students as they (a) articulate personal and professional aspirations and goals, (b) develop working relationships with classmates and instructors, and (c) engage in professional learning through webinars and dialogue.  The online platform provides an engaging environment for the cohort to connect and learn from each other’s experiences. 1 credit(s)
    Offered: FA-Term A/B, SP-Term A/B. Course Length: 15 weeks. No RC required.
  
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    APH 5541 - Mentoring in Biofeedback


    This course meets the mentoring requirements for certification set by the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance (BCIA). The course has three options for mentoring. One is in neurofeedback, the second is in pelvic floor disorders, and the third is in general biofeedback. Students wishing mentoring in more than one topic must purchase an additional course. Training is conducted via go to meeting so students must have (a) a computer with a video-camera and microphone connected to the web at a high enough speed to stream video (b) access to appropriate biofeedback equipment, and (c) have completed a didactic course which meets BCIAs requirements for the topic in which they wish to be mentored. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer semesters. Course Length: 12 weeks during Summer, 15 weeks during Fall and spring. No RC requirement.
  
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    APH 5551 - Neuromuscular Reeducation


    This course teaches the elements of kinesiological movement science and how control of movement is distorted by different clinical conditions. The course includes the elements of (a) trigger point, (b) posture, and (c) motor control / coordination assessment. Methods for using psychophysiological recording techniques for assessment of movement related disorders and postural problems are illustrated. The impact of poor posture and improper sequencing of muscle motions as well as of improper levels of tension on development and sustainment of various pain problems such as tension headaches and low back pain are discussed. Techniques for using sEMG biofeedback and other psychophysiological techniques to correct these problems are illustrated. Issues of which techniques should be applied by which types of professionals given various training and scopes of practice are discussed.  Prerequisite(s): APH 5071  and APH 5101 . 3.0 credit(s)
    Course Length: 15 weeks. 1 day RC required.
  
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    APH 5561 - Quantitative Electroencephalogram as an Assessment Tool


    Quantitative electroencephalogram (QEEG) has become an important technique for psychophysiological assessment of brain-based disorders. This course covers reading and artifacting the EEG record, montages, database comparisons, drug effects on the EEG, frequency analysis, spectral and topographic aspects and basic neuroanatomy and physiology, based upon Brodmann areas and anatomical structures. Prerequisite(s): APH 5271 . 3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: Spring Semester. Course Length: 15 weeks. 1 day RC required.
  
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    APH 5571 - Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback


    This course meets the requirements for the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance “certificate of completion” in heart rate variability (HRV). The course emphasizes methods for evaluation and training of autonomic nervous system quieting through heart rate variability biofeedback training. HRV biofeedback has been demonstrated by extensive research to provide therapeutic benefits for a growing number of medical and mental health disorders. Topics covered in the course include: (1) Cardiac anatomy and physiology, (2) Respiratory anatomy and physiology, (3) Autonomic nervous system anatomy and physiology, (4) Heart rate variability psychophysiology, (5) biofeedback instrumentation, (6) measurement, (7) biofeedback training strategies, and (8) clinical applications. Prerequisite(s): APH 5101 . 3 credit(s)
    Offered: alternate Fall semesters. Course Length: 15 weeks. No RC required.
  
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    APH 5594 - Advanced Hypnosis Practicum


    This course provides an immersion in advanced hypnotic technique and practice. Course readings and educational videos provide guidance and sample interventions utilizing hypnotic induction and therapeutic suggestion. Students engage in weekly hypnosis practice with volunteers and/or professional clients. The instructor(s) provide six videoconferences with discussion of strategies for hypnotic interventions for a variety of clinical and life problems, and supervision of the students’ practice. Students submit a video record of two hypnotic intervention sequences. Students complete a capstone essay, integrating their learning in the imagery and hypnosis course sequence, along with their learning in the advanced practicum course. Prerequisite(s): MBM 5620 , MBM 5625   3 credit(s)
    Offered: Every term. (Offering depends upon enrollment numbers.) Course Length: 8 Weeks No RC required
  
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    APH 5595 - Advanced Biofeedback Practicum


    This course includes online contact with faculty and fellow students, directed readings and research in a specialty area, as well as applied practice of biofeedback and/or neurofeedback with regular group-based supervision.  3 credit(s)
    Offered: Every term. (Offering depends upon enrollment numbers.) Course Length: 8 Weeks No RC required
  
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    APH 5620 - Basic Training and Education in Hypnosis


    This course provides students with a basic skill-set to conduct simple hypnotic interventions, along with knowledge about hypnotic concepts and approaches, and a familiarity with research-based applications of hypnosis to common medical and behavioral disorders. This course provides students with an introductory level of understanding helpful for engaging in hypnosis-based clinical practice and hypnosisoriented research in integrative health. This course introduces simple trance induction protocols, trance deepening techniques, the use of post-hypnotic suggestion, and techniques to re-alert the subject and close the trance phase. In addition, the course overviews current scientific approaches to explaining hypnotic phenomena, introduces the measurement and significance of hypnotic susceptibility, and presents several of the widely used and effective approaches for utilizing hypnosis in psychotherapy and personal transformation. Students completing this basic training sequence are equipped to begin the intermediate level training. The course is designed to follow the Standards of Training in Clinical Hypnosis as presented by D. Corydon Hammond and Gary R. Elkins for the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis- Education and Research Foundation (2005).
      3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA - Term A. Course Length: 8 Weeks RC Required
  
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    APH 5622 - Basic Training and Education in Biofeedback


    This course provides students with a basic skill-set to conduct simple biofeedback interventions, along with knowledge about biofeedback concepts and approaches, and a familiarity with research-based applications of biofeedback to common medical and behavioral disorders. This course provides students with an introductory level of understanding helpful for engaging in biofeedback-based clinical practice and psychophysiological research in integrative health. This course introduces the most commonly used biofeedback instruments, the physiological systems they measure, and the applications of these biofeedback modalities to common medical and behavioral disorders. The Saybrook biofeedback training sequence covers the Blueprint of Knowledge adopted by the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance, to guide training of biofeedback professionals (BCIA, 2006). In addition, the course overviews current scientific approaches to research on biofeedback, and will discuss several approaches for utilizing biofeedback in psychotherapy, in optimal performance training in sports and the arts, and in personal transformation. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters. Course Length: 15 weeks. 2 day RC Required.
  
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    APH 5625 - Intermediate Training and Education in Hypnosis


    This course provides students with an advanced skill-set to conduct advanced hypnotic interventions, along with additional knowledge about hypnotic concepts and approaches. In addition, the student develops a sophisticated ability to learn and assess new applications of hypnosis to common medical and behavioral disorders. This course provides students with an intermediate level of understanding helpful for engaging in hypnosis-based clinical practice and hypnosis-oriented research in integrative health. This course introduces more challenging trance induction protocols, trance deepening techniques, and uses of posthypnotic suggestion. In addition, the student learns specific approaches and techniques for a number of advanced application areas, including: 1. pain management, 2. treatment of anxiety disorders, 3. habit change protocols, 4. weight management, and 5. ego strengthening hypnotic interventions. In addition, the course reviews scientific approaches to investigating hypnotic phenomena, trains students to implement a widely accepted measure of hypnotic susceptibility, and engages the student in discussion of ethical and appropriate uses of hypnotic techniques. Prerequisite(s): APH 5620  (or equivalent training with instructor approval) 3 credit(s)
    Offered: SP - Term A Course Length: 8 Weeks RC required
  
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    APH 5627 - Intermediate Biofeedback


    This course — “intermediate training and education in general biofeedback” — provides students with more advanced skills to conduct effective higher-level biofeedback interventions, along with additional knowledge about biofeedback concepts and approaches, and a more solid grounding in research on biofeedback. The knowledge and skills included in the Saybrook biofeedback training sequence follow the “Blueprint of Knowledge” developed by the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance to guide training of biofeedback professionals (BCIA, 2006). Prerequisite(s): APH 5622   3 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall semester. Course Length: 15 weeks. 1 day RC required.
  
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    APH 5640 - Scientific Approaches to the Mind-Body Connection


    3 credit(s)
  
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    APH 5651 - Pelvic Floor Disorders


    This course provides a basic understanding of pelvic floor functions and structures along with clinical etiologies of pelvic floor disorders treated by behavioral interventions. Urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence, and muscle tension related pelvic floor and vaginal pain are emphasized. Sufficient information on research supporting behavioral interventions, clinical protocols for behavioral interventions, and sufficient simulated demonstrations are presented to bring health care providers to the point where they have the knowledge base needed to provide these interventions to their clients, within their scopes of practice and expertise, after the providers gain hands-on experience by working with experienced practitioners. Prerequisite(s): APH 5101   3.0 credit(s)
    Offered: Summer Semester. Course Length: 12 weeks. 1/2 day RC required.
  
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    APH 5701 - Practicum and Field Experience


    Students identify a clinical or applied site or sites which will provide practice opportunities for two or more of the skill areas accrued as part of their PhD degree.  Students may not select a practicum which only provides experience in areas the students are already certified or in which they have already established proficiency. Students may choose up to three settings, in which they will accrue a minimum of 90 practice hours.  Students are responsible for making financial and administrative arrangements with the director of each clinical setting. The staff of the setting is responsible for supervising the student’s clinical work at that setting and must agree to send the Saybrook University practicum instructor a detailed report of the student’s experience, number of hours spent at the site, and success at the end of the rotation.  The practicum instructor meets weekly in a videoconference with students currently in practicum settings and reviews practice experiences and skills utilized by the students in the practicum setting. A learning contract and specific learning objectives for each site are developed conjointly with the student, the Saybrook practicum instructor, and the supervising professional responsible at the clinical site. The learning contract for each site must be approved in writing by the Applied Psychophysiology Department Chair before work can begin at that site. Prerequisite(s): APH 5051  and APH 5101   3 credit(s)
    Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer semesters. Course Length: 15 weeks during Fall and Spring Semesters, 12 weekks during Summer semesters. No RC required.
  
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    APH 5751 - Professional Development Planning Seminars


    Students who have not yet established a clear career path need to plan how to integrate newly acquired psychophysiological skills into one’s professional life is critical to insuring that the program is worth pursuing. Students participate in Professional Development Seminars given approximately monthly spread across the program’s first year to aid in preparing a business plan which will be ready to be put into effect by the time the program has been completed. The plan is intended to be a guideline for application of psychophysiological skills in each student’s unique setting, be it private practice, an institutional setting or any other system or combination. Prerequisite(s): APH 5101  and permission of the APH department chair. 3.0 credit(s)
    Course Length: 12 weeks during Summer semester or 15 weeks during Fall and Spring semesters. No RC required.
  
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    APH 5771 - Case Seminars


    Students meet by video conference call about twice per month for an hour and a half to discuss psychophysiologically oriented cases they have worked with. The discussion is facilitated by the course instructor(s). Students are expected to comment on each other’s cases. Students scheduled to present at a particular meeting must e-mail brief case summaries of each case to be presented to the instructor(s) and other students at least a week in advance. These discussions are intended to guide students toward an understanding of how to incorporate psychophysiological assessment and interventional techniques into their usual approaches to patient care and to provide a bridge between the theoretical material presented during the lecture courses and the realities of modern clinical, educational, and coaching applications. The instructors are BCIA certified (Biofeedback Certification Institute of America certified) in general biofeedback, pelvic floor muscle disorders, and neurofeedback. They will use the seminar to mentor students through sufficient cases so that each student meets the BCIA requirements for mentoring in any of the above specialties in which the student wishes to be certified. Prerequisite(s): APH 5101 , APH 5271  and permission of the APH Department Chair. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Summer semester. Course Length: 12 weeks. No RC required.
  
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    APH 5801 - Anomalous Phenomena: Tools for Assessment and Investigation


    People in the behavioral sciences frequently encounter reports by people experiencing paranormal and transpersonal events. It is very difficult to establish the reliability of these reports. Studying this problem helps us learn how to establish the reliability of people’s reports of everyday stressful, unanticipated events. It is also very difficult to assess the reliability and credibility of studies in this area without special training in common techniques for conducting such investigations. Without an understanding of the “state of the field”, it is impossible to put individual reports of anomalous phenomena into context.

    Topics to be covered include (1) psychophysiology of the eleven established senses (2) senses picking up inputs different from the usual (e.g. eyes responding to vibrations), (3) strategies experimenters can adopt to investigate paranormal experiences, (4) evidence supporting telepathic, clairvoyant, precognitive, and visitation experiences among human and non-human mammals, (5) studies of mystical experiences, (6) neurophysiology of consciousness and healing at a distance, (7) methods for hardening interviews of people reporting anomalous and spiritual experiences (e.g. seeing flying saucers, sea serpents, angels, dead relatives, etc.) and (8) methods for objectively assessing spiritual and anomalous experiences.

    Numerous Saybrook faculty and advisors considerable with expertise in the investigation of anomalous phenomena will present on these topics with emphasis on ways to asses reports concerning them, current state of the scientific literature, and methods for investigating them. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Summer Semester. No RC requirement.

  
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    APH 8100 - Independent Study


    Students can use this course to learn anything within the realm of psychophysiology not covered by one of the psychophysiology courses. A faculty member has to agree to supervise the independent study. 1 credit(s)
    Offered: Spring, Fall, and Summer Semesters. Course Length: 12 weeks in Summer, 15 weeks in Fall nd Spring. No RC requirement.

Core

  
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    MBM 0901 - MBM 1-Day Residential Conference


    This course code registers the student to attend one day at the College of Integrative Medicine and Health Sciences residential conference for one day without committing to a workshop or seminar in advance. The course topics will vary widely according to which class the student attends. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 0 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA-Term A, SP-Term A. Course Length: 1-day RC.
  
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    MBM 0902 - MBM 2-Day Residential Conference


    This course code registers the student to attend two days at the College of Integrative Medicine and Health Sciences residential conference.  The course topics will vary widely according to which class the student attends. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 0 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA-Term A, SP-Term A. Course Length: 2-day RC.
  
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    MBM 0905 - MBM 5-Day Residential Conference


    This course code registers the student to attend five days at the College of Integrative Medicine and Health Sciences residential conference.  The course topics will vary widely according to which class the student attends. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 0 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA-Term A/SP-Term A. Course Length: 5-day RC.
  
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    MBM 0905H - MBM 4-Day Residential Conference


    This course code registers a Houston cohort student to attend four days at the College of Integrative Medicine and Health Sciences residential conference held at the Institute for Spirituality and Health at the Texas Medical Center.

      0 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA-Term A/SP-Term A. Course Length: 4-day RC.

  
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    MBM 5500 - Ethics in Healthcare


    This course presents the ethical standards and codes of conduct that formulate the guidelines for integrative health professionals. Issues such as cultural competency, health equity, and diversity will be explored within the field of integrative medicine. Students will reflect on their own personal values, beliefs, and biases pertaining to ethical dilemmas and decision-making.   Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA - Term B, SP - Term B. Course Length: 7 Weeks. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5511 - Graduate Colloquium


    The Graduate Colloquium is facilitated by teaching fellows to orient new students to the expectations of graduate school.  The online platform provides a supportive and engaging environment as students share academic and professional goals and learn from each other’s experiences. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 1 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA - Term A, SP - Term A Course Length: 8 Weeks. No RC Required.
  
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    MBM 5588 - MS Capstone Seminar


    This course provides students with a forum and guidance for reviewing and integrating the knowledge they have gained throughout the master’s degree program.  In a culminating essay, students will write a literature review on a relevant topic in the integrative health and wellness field, as well as discuss how they will utilize the principles of mind-body practices in their current and future careers. Prerequisite(s): No more than six outstanding credits in the final semester of the program. Department chair approval required to register. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA Terms A/B, SP Terms A/B, and SU-Term. Course Length: 15 Weeks (SU 8 Weeks). No RC.
  
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    MBM 5690 - Complementary and Integrative Medicine


    This survey course introduces integrative professions and practices within a system for health, wellness, and healing.  Throughout the term, students will critically investigate the research literature supporting the paradigms, practices, and services associated with complementary systems including naturopathy, structural and traditional medicine.  In addition, specific modalities within the systems will also be explored.  These topics include homeopathy, herbal medicine, chiropractic, massage therapy and bodywork, Traditional Chinese Medicine, acupuncture, and ayurvedic medicine.  The final module concludes with an examination of trends and opportunities in the field of integrative health and wellness. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: FA - Term B, SP - Term B Course Length: 7 Weeks. No RC.
  
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    MBM 5710 - Mind-Body Therapies and Practices


    This course provides a foundational introduction to the principles and approaches of mind-body-spirit wellness.  Students will be introduced to the research and the practices that support health, wellness, and healing outcomes.  Through readings, discussions, and practices, students will have opportunities to integrate these principles and techniques personally and professionally. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite. 3 credit(s)
    Offered: Offered FA - Term A, SP - Term A. Course Length: 7 weeks. No RC.

Counseling

  
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    CES 7000 - Advanced Theories and Practice


    This course examines several major counseling theories in the context of counselor education and supervision. Students will have an opportunity to explore, compare, and integrate counseling theories in pedagogy and practice. Students will demonstrate knowledge and application of major theories pertaining to the principles and practices of counseling and counselor education, this will include the conceptualization of clients from multiple theoretical perspectives. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CES 7010 - Supervision and Consultation


    This course provides an opportunity for students to learn, synthesize, and apply knowledge of supervision theory, and the consultations process as they develop their personal style for supervision and consultation. Students will be exposed to current theories, models, and topics related to supervision and consultation. Ethical and legal issues in supervision and consultation will be addressed. This course will include an opportunity to supervise Master’s level field work - under the supervision of a faculty member. 3 credit(s)
  
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    CES 7015 - Advanced Diversity


    This course will provide students with an opportunity to explore identity, and intersectionality a multicultural and diverse society. Emphasis will be placed on delivering culturally relevant counseling in multiple settings, conducting supervision, and conducting research. The role of racial, ethnic, and cultural heritage; nationality; socioeconomic status; family structure; age; gender; sexual identity; religious and spiritual beliefs; occupation; physical and mental status; local, regional, national, and international perspectives will be explored- as they related to individual identity, access to services, and culturally competent counseling. Finally, equity issues in counselor education programs, counseling supervision, and counseling research will be explored. 3 credit(s)
 

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